Friday, September 22, 2017 at 5:30 pm
posted by Billie Owens in news, announcements, lead, Wyoming County, health.

Press release:

Before you start your fall clean-up consider the age of your home and whether or not you may have a lead hazard.

“Lead poisoning can affect anyone, but is especially harmful to pregnant women, infants and small children who are growing rapidly,” said Paul Pettit, Public Health director for Genesee and Orleans counties.

Lead poisoning can cause miscarriages and stillbirths, high blood pressure (hypertension), nerve disorders, memory and concentration problems and muscle and joint pain and in children it can lower IQ, cause growth problems, kidney damage, behavior problems, anemia and hearing loss.

If lead poisoning is not taken care of, it can also cause permanent damage to various organs in both children and adults. You may or may not experience any signs or symptoms of lead poisoning. State law requires all children be tested at age 1 and again at age 2. Contact your primary care doctor to be tested.

Federal law requires landlords and contractors who are hired for renovations, repair and painting in homes, childcare centers and schools built before 1978 that disturb painted surfaces, to be certified and follow specific practices to prevent lead contamination.

This law is the EPA’s Lead Renovation, Repair and Painting (RPR) Rule. Lead-based paint is especially problematic on surfaces that children can chew on such as windowsills, doors and doorframes, stairs, railings, banisters, porches and fences Lead can also be found in drinking water in homes that have plumbing with lead or lead solder.

“If you suspect that your house has lead hazards, here are some important things you can do to protect your family,” Pettit said.

  • Take advantage of the Free Lead Testing Pilot Program: A $1.5 million state program to test for lead in drinking water is available to New York State residents. Provides residents who are served by either a private well or public water system with an opportunity to have their residential drinking water tested for free. To sign-up visit, https://health.ny.gov/environmental/water/drinking/lead/free_lead_testing_pilot_program.htm.
  • If you rent, call the landlord immediately to report peeling or chipping paint.
  • Damp mop and damp dust often. Clean up paint chips right away and clean all other surfaces with general all-purpose cleaner.
  • Let your cold water run for a minute before using it for making baby formula, drinking, brushing your teeth and cooking to flush lead picked up from pipes. Do NOT use warm tap water to make baby formula.
  • Wash children’s hands and toys often to wash off any lead dust. Keep them way from chipping paint and prevent destructive behaviors like chewing on painted surfaces.
  • Always hire certified contractors for work that will disrupt paint in housing or child occupied buildings before 1978 or get properly trained and certified yourself. For a certified firm check this site: http://cfpub.epa.gov/flpp/searchrrp_firm.htm.

For more information about the Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule (RRP) visit the Environmental Protection Agency web site at www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/renovation.htm or call the National Lead Information Center at 1-800-424-LEAD.

To learn about additional sources of lead visit, https://www.health.ny.gov/environmental/lead/sources.htm.

For information about services that your local health department provides visit:

Friday, September 22, 2017 at 4:59 pm

Press release:

U.S. Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer today announced a total of $1,416,000 in federal funding for the Town of Byron and the Village of Wyoming. The federal funding was allocated through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development program.

Specifically, the Village of Wyoming will receive a $666,000 USDA Water and Waste Disposal Grant to replace an existing water main, update a water storage tank, and install a new well. The new well will provide a second water source for the town, bringing them up to Department of Health regulations. This update will provide water to 163 residents and local businesses, and will protect the village’s drinking water source and supply.

The Town of Byron will receive a $750,000 USDA Water and Waste Disposal Grant to create Water District #8, which will provide water services to 170 additional residents.

“This federal investment is a shot in the arm for Upstate New York’s local economies,” Senator Schumer said. “These federal funds for the Town of Byron and the Village of Wyoming will help boost economic development in the region and support critical water infrastructure.

"I am proud to announce this federal investment and will continue to fight to make sure that rural communities have the tools they need to protect and maintain their infrastructure.”

USDA Rural Development's mission is to increase economic opportunity and improve the quality of life for rural residents. This funding is awarded through the Rural Business Development Grant program, administered by the USDA’s Rural Development agency.

The Rural Development agency is committed to improving economies and lives in rural America, through loans, grants and loan guarantees. They support local businesses, individuals and communities by promoting economic development, offering loans and providing technical assistance.

Friday, September 22, 2017 at 3:56 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Warsaw, Attica, Arcade, Castile, Perry.

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun Sept. 20 and are from State Correctional Facilities.

Bail is set for state inmate cases for two reasons:

    • In the event that the inmate’s current sentence is overturned on appeal or the inmate’s sentence is about to expire the bail will kick in on the new case and the inmate would be turned over to the Wyoming County jail while the new case is pending; and

    • When bail is placed on an inmate it follows the inmate so when they are moved to different facilities it is one way for them to be found and also the state system knows there is another case still pending.

Luis Pagan was sentenced to seven years in prison, five years post-release supervision, and surcharges and fees. He was convicted of assault in the second degree, a Class D felony. The sentence is to run concurrently to his current term.

Patrick Hill was sentenced to one-and-one-half years in prison and one year post-release supervision on the conviction of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class D felony. The sentence is to run consecutively with his current sentence.

James Smith had his case adjourned to Oct. 25 for a hearing.

Anthony Placido was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison on the conviction of attempted promoting prison contraband, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. The sentence is to run consecutively to his current term. Placido is also responsible for all surcharges incurred.

Calvin Benjamin pled guilty to attempted promoting prison contraband, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. He was indicted for promoting prison contraband, a Class D felony. Sentencing is scheduled Nov. 8.

Bryant Gibbs was in court for motions. His case was adjourned to Oct. 5 for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Ryan Boodhoo pled not guilty to promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony. Motions are scheduled Nov. 8. Bail was set at $5,000.

Carlos Corrales pled not guilty to promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony. Motions are scheduled Nov. 8. Bail was set at $5,000.

Dominick Coffer was in court for motions. A trial is scheduled Dec. 14.

Benedict Agostini had his case adjourned to Oct. 11 for motions and a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Donald Green was in court for motions. The case has been adjourned to Oct. 11 for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Steven Green was in court for motions. The case has been adjourned to Oct. 11 for an appearance.

Deoz Miller-Harris was in court for motions. The case has been adjourned to Oct. 11 for an appearance.

The following were in court before Mohun Sept. 20 and 21.

Jonathon Bucknam, who is accused of a crime in Perry, was in court for motions. The case has been adjourned to Oct. 4 for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Aaron Schinsing, who is accused of a crime in Arcade, had his case adjourned to Dec. 21 for pre-plea.

Cory Dahl, who is accused of a crime in Castile, had his case adjourned to today.

Eduardo Bautista-Cruz, who committed a crime in Genesee Falls, waived indictment on burglary in the second degree, a Class C felony, and unlawful imprisonment in the first degree, a Class E felony. He pled guilty to attempted burglary in the second degree, a Class D felony. He was sentenced to a conditional discharge and surcharges. An order of protection was also issued.

Stephen Harder, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to four years in prison with 10 years post-release supervision, fees and surcharges. He was convicted of attempted course of sexual conduct against a child in the second degree, a Class E felony. An order of protection was also issued.

Friday, September 22, 2017 at 3:19 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, Sen. Gallivan, announcements.

Press release:

On Sept. 12 a bill was signed into law that closes crucial gaps in the communication between and among agencies responsible for the safety of children in foster care.

The bill (S4172), sponsored by Sen. Patrick M. Gallivan (R-C-I, Elma), requires the notification of agencies placing foster children when there are reports of suspected abuse or maltreatment at homes where children have been placed. Officials say this would prevent the unwitting placement of additional children in situations that risk subjecting them to abuse or maltreatment.

“The state has a responsibility to ensure the safety and welfare of all of New York’s children, especially those in foster care,” Gallivan said. “By sharing critical information about suspected abuse or maltreatment, we can better protect these vulnerable children and avoid putting additional youth at risk.”

The measure requires that suspected abuse or maltreatment reports be provided to the responsible agency or social services entity in cases where children are placed in homes outside the jurisdiction of origin. For example, if a child is the responsibility of authorities in Warsaw, and the child is placed with a foster family in Java, then any suspected abuse or maltreatment reports would need to be filed with the responsible agency in Java, too, and vice versa. The intention is to eliminate bureaucratic loopholes and strengthen oversight. 

The State Senate and Assembly passed the legislation earlier this year. Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed the bill into law on Sept. 12.

Friday, September 22, 2017 at 3:04 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Perry, Arcade.
tue_erin_1.jpg
      Erin True

Erin True, 34, of Perry, was charged Sept. 21 with grand larceny in the fourth degree and identity theft in the third degree. True allegedly used the credit card number from a previous boyfriend to pay $440 on her Dish Network account. Perry Police say the victim contacted police when he noticed discrepancies on his credit card account. True was arraigned in Perry Village Court and put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $1,000. She is due in court at a later date.

Stephanie Larrabee, 27, of Arcade, was charged Sept. 18 with issuing a bad check. Larrabee is accused of writing a check for $294.30, which was returned for non-sufficient funds. She is due in the Town of Sardinia Court later this month.

Friday, September 22, 2017 at 1:35 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, Castile, pets.

beast_and_night_crawler_for_article.jpg

Information sourced from a press release, file photo

Because cats breed so readily, a few unsprayed female cats can quickly turn a few strays into an unmanageable hoard. Due to the number of hoarding situations addressed in 2016, New Start Kitty Shelter adopted out 789 cats.

To facilitate these adoptions without adding to the cat population, the Castile-based rescue spends up to $1,000 to $3,000 a month on spay/neuter alone. Some months it came to $5,000 to $6000. Most of the grants available are designated for low-cost spay/neuter of owned cats. There is also assistance through a coupon payment plan.

While the low-cost spay/neuter program is important for the community, it does not support cats that come from hoarding, strays, or from owner surrenders to the shelter.

"As always, there were no shortages of cats to rescue and shelter during the past year," said A New Start Kitty Rescue Shelter's Co-President Vickie Bly at its recent annual meeting. "We were crazy busy last year…cleaning up messes where people have accumulated cats that have not been spayed."

The Kitty Rescue is an all-volunteer organization that provides services to Wyoming and surrounding counties. Operating on a $30,000 yearly budget, the funding comes from direct donations and fundraisers held throughout the year.

Officials say, while their fundraising efforts are fruitful, they are still a few thousand dollars short for the upcoming winter months.

In addition to direct donations, volunteers are needed for cleaning the shelter and litter boxes, assisting or organizing fundraisers, transportation, and cuddling frightened kittens. Donations are also needed for raffle baskets, food, and scoopable litter.

Donations can be sent to 6342 Denton Corners Road, Castile.

For more information on A New Start Kitty Shelter visit volunteers at the AppleUmpkin Festival this Saturday and Sunday in Wyoming or call (585) 493-5206.

For information on low-cost spay/neuter call (585) 493-5956.

Friday, September 22, 2017 at 12:29 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Warsaw.

Press release:

On Tuesday, Sept. 26,  Oak Orchard Health will join more than 2,500 partners nationwide in hosting a National Voter Registration Day 2017 event at its centers in Albion, Brockport and Warsaw. They will be part of a massive 50-state effort to register thousands of voters.

The event will be held at the following locations:

    • 81 S. Main St., Warsaw, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.;

    • 301 West Ave., Albion, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and

    • 300 West Ave., Brockport, from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.

The goal for this year’s annual National Voter Registration Day is to increase participation in the 2017 state and municipal elections across the country. The event aims to encourage Americans to register to vote and make their voices heard at the ballot box.

While national elections get the media attention, local elections in many ways have a more direct impact on people’s lives. Local government is accountable for the quality of roads and transit systems, schools, parks and greenways, public safety and more. 

National Voter Registration Day started in 2012 for the presidential election. The event is designed to create an annual moment when the entire nation focuses on registering Americans to exercise their most basic right – the right to vote. 

Americans can also register to vote online at www.NationalVoterRegistrationDay.org.

Friday, September 22, 2017 at 12:13 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, agriculture, Warsaw, 4-H.

Information sourced from a press release

The Wyoming County Cornell Cooperative Extension Board of Directors recently selected Laura Fuller as its new executive director. Starting on Oct. 2, Fuller will lead the 100-year-old organization, as well as provide regional oversight for the Western Shared Business Network.

Fuller received her master’s degree from Ohio State University with specializations in sociology of agriculture, rural community studies, and community development.

“I am so excited to join the Wyoming County CCE team. Seeing the beauty of Wyoming County and the dedication of the staff and volunteers made it an easy decision,” Fuller said. “From meeting local stakeholders who took time out of their busy days to show me their farms and businesses, to the incredible turnout at the job presentations, it is clear that the citizens in Wyoming County care about what we do, and I look forward to being a part of that.”

Early in her Cooperative Extension career, Fuller worked in Ohio’s urban communities setting up 4-H After School clubs for at-risk youth. Additionally, she taught healthy nutrition in fourth-grade classrooms. She has held appointments as a 4-H educator and community development educator specializing in workforce, organizational, and leadership development. She is an experienced grant writer and has also served on regional and national committees to advance the work of Cooperative Extension.

Serving as an ombudsman for the Navy, Fuller worked with reservists and their families to overcome problems during mobilizations. She also served to support military families in times of crisis.

“We have long-tenured staff and volunteers who are competent, respected leaders and we sought someone with business acumen and roots in research to ensure that our future programming fully explores the needs of our community while addressing our long-term viability,” said Board President Keith Kibler. “We are confident Laura will add incredible energy and passion to an already impressive team at CCE of Wyoming County.”

For more information on Wyoming County CCE visit Wyoming.cce.cornell.edu.

Friday, September 22, 2017 at 11:11 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, Warsaw.

bar_assoc._golf_tourney.jpg

Photo submitted

On Sept. 8 the Wyoming County Bar Association held its annual charity golf tournament at Arrowwood Golf Course, 6005 Bauer Road, Warsaw.

On Sept. 20, members of the Bar Association, local officials, and the community were on hand when Association President Mason Meyer presented Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA) Executive Director Maggie Thomas with a check for $2,430.93 at the County Courthouse, Main Street, Warsaw. The funds were donated to the MDA through Scott’s Striders.

Scott’s Striders is a local team who has participated in the MDA Muscle Walk in Rochester for the past 11 years. The team was built to support Warsaw resident Scott Crater who suffers from Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Shortly after the team’s inception, fellow Warsaw residents and brothers Josh and Jake Schell, who also have DMD, joined the team.

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rapidly progressive form of muscular dystrophy that occurs primarily in boys. DMD is caused by an absence of dystrophin, a protein that helps keep muscle cells intact. Those who suffer from DMD experience a progressive loss of muscle function and weakness, which typically begins in the lower limbs.

There is no known cure for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Treatment aims to control symptoms to improve quality of life.

In all, Scott’s Striders is made up of 40 members who raise money and participate in the annual Muscle Walk. The team has raised more than $16,000 over the past four years through a variety of fundraisers in the fight against the muscle disease.

This year, the team held a daily raffle throughout the month of August. The proceeds raised through the raffle and the donation from the Wyoming County Bar Association allowed its member to raise approximately $8,700 for the fight against MD.

For more information about the MDA Muscle Walk click here.

Thursday, September 21, 2017 at 4:32 pm
posted by Billie Owens in Attica, charity, announcements.

In photo above are members of the band Higher Mountain.

Submitted photos and press release:

Press release:

The fall third annual Higher Mountain Festival for Charity will be held from noon to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 30th at Bennington Lanes Grove,1374 Clinton Street Road, Attica.

Funds raised will support Immaculata Home, a home for displaced women in the WNY region, particularly those who have been affected by incarceration and who are without dependents and family support.

The fundraiser headed by Americana and bluegrass bands features a regional favorite Higher Mountain, and the return of a famous family bluegrass band from this area, The Bartholomew Family, plus two other Rochester bands -- High Mileage and Gone Fishing. 

A basket raffle, 50/50, auction and open jamming (bring your instrument) are also planned. 

Higher Mountain has played as far West as the state of Wyoming, and far South as Naples, Fla., and North as Plattsburgh. Formed by Charlie Kesterson, a past Tennessee resident, who has played internationally including being a member of the first band featuring the famous Gibson Brothers, called the North Country Ramblers, features fast driving bluegrass banjo and fiddle. There CD recording "Mother’s Song," includes original tunes written by Christine Kesterson. 

This year the festival will bring The Bartholomew Family back to WNY. The Bartholomew Family band was headed by recently deceased Dean Bartholomew, of Addison, who promoted bluegrass music throughout his life. His three sons, Dale, Scott and Terry will return to the stage at this year’s festival.

Immaculata Home Inc., opened in Lockport, in June. This 501c3 charity provides housing for women who lack family support and find themselves searching for a supportive environment. Residents of Immaculata Home volunteer to give back to their community.

Christine Kesterson, the guitar player in Higher Mountain, is a Master’s in Divinity graduate of Christ the King Seminary, East Aurora, and serves as the chaplain to Immaculata Home residents and board. 

The committee has suggested a donation of $15 reserved seating through 716-870-6932 or $20 at the door (bring a lawn chair). Under age 16 are admitted free. Groups of eight can reserve a table at a discount for $100. Cash donations in support can be sent to Immaculata Home Inc., P.O. Box 103, Lockport, NY 14095.

For more information on Immaculata Home view www.immaculatahome.org.

In photo below are members of the band The Bartholomew Family.

Thursday, September 21, 2017 at 3:02 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, accident, Middlebury, news.

fatal_accident_in_middlebury.jpg

Photo credit: Alecia Kaus/Video News Service

A Corfu man died this morning as a result of injuries suffered during a vehicle accident at the intersection of West Middlebury and East Bethany roads, Middlebury.

The collision occurred around 8:30 when the driver of a 2013 Toyota Tacoma failed to yield to a 2014 International tractor trailer.

The driver of the Tacoma, Dean M. Dale, 54, of Corfu, was traveling eastbound on West Middlebury Road when he struck the tractor trailer traveling northbound on East Bethany Road.

Lifesaving measures performed by New York State troopers and Genesee County Sheriff’s deputies were unsuccessful and the man was pronounced dead at the scene.

The State Police collision reconstruction unit assisted in the investigation however, officials say it is still an ongoing investigation.

UPDATE 9:54 a.m. Sept. 22: Dale was an employee at United Memorial Medical Center in Batavia. 

Stacey Pastuszynski, UMMC Public Relations Advisor, released a statement:

We are deeply saddened to learn of Dean’s passing.  He was a valued member of our Radiology team since 2012 and a dear friend that will be sadly missed by many.

Dean’s family, friends and UMMC team are in our thoughts during this difficult time.

Thursday, September 21, 2017 at 1:44 pm

Two firefighters sustained injuries during a barn fire Wednesday afternoon at 5622 Broughton Road, Gainesville. One firefighter suffered a broken wrist and the other with exhaustion. Both members were treated and released from Wyoming County Community Hospital.

Crews from Silver Springs, Castile, Perry, Gainesville, Perry Center, Pike, Bliss, North Java, Warsaw, Nunda, Cuylerville, and Pavilion fire departments were on the scene of the blaze for eight hours.

Fire Chief in Charge Silver Springs Fire Chief John Proper and crew were assisted at the scene by Wyoming County Emergency Services, Wyoming Correctional Facility and Monroe Ambulance. Companies standing by at empty fire stations included Wyoming, Mount Morris, Cuylerville, Wiscoy Rossburg fire departments, and Mount Morris Emergency Medical Services.

The fire at Broughton Farms caused an estimated $350,000 in damages and remains under investigation.

Thursday, September 21, 2017 at 1:14 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Perry, Warsaw.

Two Virginia men are facing numerous drug-related charges following a traffic stop on Route 20A in Perry.

Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say Aaron T. Burrill, 42, was stopped for failing to signal a turn and a broken taillight. A driving-while-impaired investigation began when deputies suspected Burrill of being impaired by drugs and alcohol. He was given field sobriety testing, which he allegedly performed poorly.

During the course of the traffic stop, drug paraphernalia used for smoking crack cocaine was found inside of the vehicle. Additionally, Burrill’s passenger, Deybi I. Espinoza, 28, is accused of being in possession of cocaine.

The driver was taken to the Wyoming County Sheriff’s office where a drug influence evaluation by a certified drug recognition expert determined him to be impaired by multiple combinations of drugs.

Burrill was charged with: inadequate taillight; no turn signal; consumption of alcohol in a motor vehicle; DWAI – drug; DWAI – combination of drugs and alcohol; criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree; and criminal use of drug paraphernalia in the second degree.

Espinoza was charged with consumption of alcohol in a motor vehicle, criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree, and criminal use of drug paraphernalia in the second degree.

Both men were arraigned in the Village of Warsaw Court and put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $500 cash bail or $3,000 bond.

They are both due in Town of Perry Court at a later date.

Thursday, September 21, 2017 at 12:52 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, accident, news, Java, Arcade, Varysburg, Strykersville.

Failure to stop at a stop sign resulted in an injury accident in Java late Wednesday morning.

Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say, Ja-Ryan Marquis Steen, 24, of Arcade, was headed east on Beaver Meadow Road when he failed to stop at the stop sign at Route 98.

The investigation showed he left the east side of Route 98, which caused the tanker to enter a deep ravine and rollover onto the driver's side of the vehicle.

Steen was extricated by emergency personnel after a heavy wrecker tow truck moved the cab of the truck. He was taken to ECMC in Buffalo via Mercy Flight for treatment of chest and leg injuries.

Officials say Steen was driving a milk tanker truck and had just left a nearby farm on Beaver Meadow Road moments before the accident.

Assisting deputies at the scene included North Java, Strykersville and Varysburg fire departments, and the Wyoming County Hazmat team and Monroe medics.

The investigation is ongoing.

Thursday, September 21, 2017 at 12:12 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Perry.
david_l._purdy.jpg
      David L. Purdy

A Perry man, who was arrested for his role in an alleged theft that occurred at the Dollar General in Perry, garnered additional charges relating to that incident.

David L. Purdy, 34, of Perry, was charged Sept. 18 with trespassing, harassment in the second degree, stalking in the fourth degree, and intimidating a victim/witness.

On Aug. 24, Purdy was arrested on a conspiracy charge for allegedly standing in the way of security cameras during an alleged theft. His accomplice, Lisa Uvenio (Braymiller), was accused of stealing a box of sinus headache medicine, valued at $3, and putting it in her purse. Both suspects then left the store, store officials say. On Sept. 16, Purdy was accused of intimidating a witness from that incident.

He was arraigned on the new charges in the Perry Village Court and put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $25,000 cash bail or $50,000 bond.

He is due back in court Oct. 10.

See related: Law and Order: Perry woman accused of stealing cell phone cases from Batavia Walmart 

Thursday, September 21, 2017 at 8:44 am
posted by Howard Owens in accident, news, Wyoming.

A car vs. dump truck accident is reported in the area of 486 E. Bethany Road, Wyoming.

Two people are reported trapped in a vehicle.

Mercy Flight is requested to the scene.

Ambulances from Warsaw and Bethany requested to the scene.

Wyoming fire dispatched.

UPDATE 8:47 a.m.: Both ambulances from Warsaw responding. One person is critical, two entrapped.

UPDATE 8:50 a.m.: Mercy Flight has a 15-minute ETA. The landing zone will be at the fire hall.

UPDATE 8:52 a.m.: Cancel Mercy Flight.

UPDATE 8:54 a.m.: Chief updates, there is only one victim. The other person was a person helping.

UPDATE 9:06 a.m.: Bethany's response is canceled. 

Wednesday, September 20, 2017 at 3:14 pm
posted by Billie Owens in North Java, Wyoming County, agribusiness, farming, Business.

Press release:

NORTH JAVA NY -- U.S. Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer today launched a major effort to protect funding for the Northeast Center For Occupational Safety And Health For Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing (NEC), which administers critical farm safety programs for Western New York and farm workers throughout Upstate New York.

One example of this important work is the National Rollover Protection System (ROPS) Rebate Program. NEC’s research led to this life-saving rebate program which provides critical information to farmers on how to find and install the right rollover bar for their machinery and provides rebates to farmers to cover approximately 70 percent of the cost for a farmer to install a ROPS roll bar retrofit kit on their tractor.

Schumer pointed to data that says farm related deaths are 800-percent higher than many other industries, and that tractor over-turns are the most frequent cause of deaths on farms, at a rate of 96 cases per year. For this reason, Schumer vowed to fight and tooth and nail to reverse this proposed funding cut that delivers continued research and administration of life-saving programs like these.

“Keeping family farmers and farm workers who operate dangerous machinery safe should be a priority for us all. That is why I am urging my colleagues in Congress to reverse these harmful proposed cuts and restore funding for critical farm safety programs and research,” Senator Schumer said. “The work done by organizations like the NEC is exactly the type of work the federal government should be investing in: it’s cost-effective, informed by real industry experts, and helps save farmers’ lives every day.

"By slashing funding to this life-saving organization, we jeopardize successful programs that are providing critical resources to farmers, like a 1-800 safety hot-line number and on the ground experts in rural communities, so farmers can access the ROPS Rebate Program, which helps farmers correctly install rollover bars on their tractors just in case the tractor flips over. We need to do everything possible to make sure we are investing in developing new safety solutions for our farmers and growers and I will be doing everything possible to make sure this program which puts farmers first is protected.”

Schumer explained that the administration’s proposed 2018 budget would severely cut funding for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), a branch of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that conducts research, by more than 40 percent. This cut is significant because the funding that is threatened supports research in regional and community-based programs for farm safety, such as the Northeast Center For Occupational Safety And Health For Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing (NEC).

The NEC, which is an affiliate of Bassett Health, serves a 12-state region and is headquartered in Cooperstown, NY. From Maine through West Virginia, NEC promotes health and safety research, education, and prevention activities in the high-risk areas of farming, commercial fishing and logging. With fatality rates in the agricultural industry up to 800 percent higher than many other industries, Schumer said the work NEC does is critical to the safety of Upstate New York’s farmers and farm workers and the loss of this crucial funding would hurt NEC’s ability to research innovative ways to protect farmers now and in the future.

An example of the importance of NEC’s work is the development and expansion of the National Rollover Protective Structures (ROPS) Rebate Program. Tractor rollovers are the No. 1 cause of farm related injury and death, resulting in an average of 96 deaths year. In fatal instances, the cost of an overturn could reach nearly $1 million and nearly seven out of 10 farms go out of business within five years of an accident.

There have been four rollover accidents in Wyoming County reported since 1997, including two fatalities. In 2014 a farmer in the Town of Gainsville in Wyoming County was killed after his tractor overturned on a hill where he was operating in a field off of Route 19A. In 2004 a farm worker was killed when the farm tractor he was operating to move calf hutches overturned and pinned him between the tractor and a large storage trailer. Additionally, last month in August a man was fatally injured in nearby East Aurora when a tractor he was riding in rolled over him while he was dragging a stump.

In response to this hazardous environment, the NEC launched an effort to create the life-saving ROPS Rebate Program, which covers approximately 70 percent of the cost for a farmer to install a ROPS rollbar kit on their tractor. In most cases this means farmers only pay $500 or less for this life-saving equipment that can otherwise cost up to $1,200.

NEC also provides information to farmers on how to find and install the right rollover bar. Since its inception in 2006, the NEC reports that more than 2,150 tractors have been retrofitted with protective structures in seven states, with more than 1,500 of those retrofits occurring in New York State alone. The program has also been extremely popular in the nine-county Finger Lakes Region with over 200 farmers that have retrofitted, including 24 so far in Wyoming County.

Additionally, feedback from users has been extremely positive, with participants in New York reporting 221 close calls and 19 serious incidents in which death or injury were likely without protective structures.

Standing at Lamb & Webster, a Wyoming County-based farm equipment dealer in North Java, Schumer also underscored that the NEC relies on this federal funding to administer the National ROPS tractor rollover bar rebate program which supports local jobs. Lamb & Webster is one of many local businesses that work with NEC to install and retrofit tractors with the rollbar ROPS kit for farmers.

Schumer said in this way the ROPS program funding is a win-win-win: it helps farmers upgrade their tractors, it saves lives, and it supports local jobs at farm equipment suppliers like Lamb & Webster.

Schumer said that what makes this program so effective is that it is supported by the National Tractor Safety Council, an organization with representation from nearly 60 multi-sector industry and advocacy groups. Schumer added that by slashing funding for the NEC, we are not only putting this life-saving program at risk, but future development of new safety solutions will also be at risk.

The senator vowed to fight to reverse proposed NIOSH-CDC budget cuts so that the NEC can continue its valuable work with the ROPS Rebate Program and other initiatives that enhance the health and safety of agriculture, forestry and fishing workers in New York and across the country.

The NEC has been identified by the federal government as one of ten agricultural centers across the country. They partner with government agencies, hospitals, manufacturers, family farms, and industry professionals to identify and prioritize occupational injury and fatality patterns, conduct research on how best to address these hazards, and work to make safety practices more cost-effective and accessible to thousands of agriculture, forestry, and fishing workers throughout the Northeast. According to NEC, half of their staff was raised or currently lives on farms and they remain deeply rooted in the farm community.

Schumer was joined by New York State Farm Bureau District 2 Director Patrick McCormick, NYS Farm Bureau Field Advisor Amanda Krenning-Muoio, Local farmers Jeff Meeder and Sarah Noble-Moag who both used to the ROPS program to retrofit tractors for their farms, Vice President & CFO of Lamb & Webster Inc. Earl LeGrou, and Patrick O'Hara, clinical case manager at The Northeast Center For Agricultural Medicine & Health

O'Hara said: “Although the elimination of this program would obviously negatively impact the health and safety of farmers and their workers, it’s a particularly frustrating decision, given the increasing pressure farmers are under to eliminate hazards from a naturally hazardous industry. Our NIOSH funded program offers farmers expertise on farm training and safety assistance programs like the ROPS program all of which make safety changes easier and cost-effective for farmers. Eliminating programs like ours would leave only one solution for reducing occupational fatalities and injuries, OSHA and regulation.”

McCormick said: “This federal NIOSH funding is vital to continue the work of the New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health, through the assistance of Northeast Center for Occupational Health and Safety (NEC) to provide training, farm safety research, and cost-sharing programs like the ROPS tractor rollbar rebate program. These efforts are vital to promote farm safety and safeguard our farm workers and farm families.”

Tuesday, September 19, 2017 at 3:17 pm

letchworth_mem._day_balloon_launch_1.jpg

Information sourced from a press release, file photo:

Letchworth State Park is up against 20 of New York’s top attractions in the 2017 round of USA Today 10 Best Readers’ Choice Award for “your favorite attraction” in New York State.

The Wyoming County Chamber & Tourism office is encouraging everyone to vote for Letchworth State Park, one of the top nominees again this year. The world-renowned attraction is up against some very stiff competition among New York’s most well-known tourist attractions.

“We encourage everyone to share the contest to their social media accounts and to get the message out about the contest,” said Chamber & Tourism Director of Tourism and Marketing Eric Szucs. “Letchworth State Park won the #1 State Park designation because of its natural beauty and strong following worldwide. Let’s try to again capture the momentum and win again for this great natural asset.”

USA Today Readers’ Choice 10 Best website reports that some of the United States' most recognizable attractions – Times Square, the Statue of Liberty, Central Park, the Empire State Building – are found in New York City.

While the Big Apple has no shortage of travel-worthy attractions, the rest of the state is well worth exploring as well. Outside the iconic metropolis in the Empire State, travelers find natural wonders like Niagara Falls, the Thousand Islands, Letchworth State Park, award-winning wineries, Revolutionary War sites and the elegant estates of the Hudson Valley.

“We are up against some very tough competition in New York this time around,” said Chamber & Tourism President Scott Gardner. “If everyone that loves Letchworth State Park votes in the contest we can once again win the competition and claim the title of ‘favorite attraction’ recognizing this well-known destination right here in Wyoming County.”

Voting for Letchworth State Park is easy. Simply visit the Chamber & Tourism Facebook page at to find the link or visit USA Today’s Readers’ Choice contest website at www.10best.com/awards/travel/best-new-york-attraction/, then scroll down the page and select Letchworth State Park. Voting can be done daily until noon Oct. 10.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017 at 2:43 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, agriculture, announcements, Pike, 4-H.

2017_4-hers_fair_results_1_copy.jpg

2017_4-hers_fair_results_2_copy.jpg

(Captions at bottom of story.)

Information sourced from a press release, photos submitted:

A total of 1,040 exhibits were judged and awarded ribbons this year at the Wyoming County Fair in Pike. Additionally, 153 4-H Cloverbud exhibits were on display and awarded participation ribbons. Several displays and activities in the Youth Building reflected this year’s fair theme – Hometown Pride Shared County Wide.

Castile County Kids 4-H Club received First Place Blue for their 4-H Club educational exhibit. Master Builders 4-H Club won Second Place Blue and The Zoo Crew 4-H Club earned Third Place Blue.

Throughout the week, 32 4-H’ers repeated their public presentations and 22 mannequin-modeled in the Youth Building at the Pike Fair.

There were 160 exhibits from Wyoming County 4-H'ers at the New York State Fair in Syracuse Sept. 1-4. At State Fair, Wyoming County 4-H'ers were awarded 106 Blue Ribbons, 34 Red Ribbons, four White Ribbons and 13 Participation Ribbons (for Cloverbud exhibits).

The following 4-H member's projects were chosen to represent Wyoming County at the Pike fair and were on exhibit at this year’s New York State Fair:

Communications & Expressive Arts

    • Elliana Wolcott

Food & Nutrition (including Preserved Foods)

    • Jack Heppner

    • Allison Herrick

    • Derek Ikeler

    • Jodilee Ikeler

    • Aidan Kimpel

    • Lilah Stroud

    • Nathan Zywiczynski

    • Macy Boss

    • Danielle Herrick

    • Noelle Milhollen

    • Morgan Milhollen

    • Autumn Milhollen

    • Dylan Mirrione

    • Autumn Patterson

    • David Zywiczynski

    • Abigail Parker (3 items)

    • Grace Zywiczynski

    • Nathan Perl

    • Rachel Zielinski

    • Kelsey Arnold

    • Katie Fisher

    • Mya Hardie

    • Gae Mysliwiec

    • Isabella Noon

    • Elliana Wolcott

Fine Arts & Crafts

    • Rebecca Semmel

    • Emelyn Bell

    • Grace Kunze (2 items)

    • Megan Minkel (3 items)

    • Payton Romance

    • Grace Zywiczynski

    • Ashley Peila

    • Sorrell Brown

    • Bridgette Deer

    • Sylvia Waligora

    • Alexis Johnson

    • Katie Fisher

    • Danielle Herrick

    • Mary Jane Mathis (2 items)

    • Abigail Schreiber (2 items)

Hobby Crafts & Home Environment

    • Mary Jane Mathis (2 items)

    • Abigail Schreiber

    • Alexa Wolcott

    • Elliana Wolcott

    • Kelsey Arnold

    • Katelyn Hardie

    • Macy Boss

    • Rebecca Semmel (2 items)

Child Development/Care

    • Rebecca Semmel

Wearable Art

    • Emily Brown

    • Abigail Skillman

Textile & Clothing

    • Katie Fisher

    • Lilly Auger

    • Alexa Wolcott

    • Carlee Fisher

    • Linsey Rissinger

    • Katie Terry (2 items)

    • Miriam Shepard

    • Lea Tokarczyk

***Additionally, Abigail Parker had her dress selected for State Fair but could not have it formally judged due to her participation in the NYS Fair Fashion Revue.

Visual Arts/Photography

    • Nate Zywiczynski (2 items)

    • Rebecca Semmel

    • Noah Almeter

    • Caleigh Castlevetere

    • Alexa Domes (2 items)

    • Isabella Noon

    • Katie O’Hare (2 items)

    • Sarah Phillips (2 items)

    • Rebekah Spicer (2 items)

    • Katie Terry

    • Meredyth Weaver

    • David Zywiczynski

Vegetables

    • Elizabeth Skrzpek (4 items)

    • David Zywiczynski (8 items)

    • Grace Zywiczynski (8 items)

    • Joe Zielinski (5 items)

    • Mary Zielinski (4 items)

    • Rachel Zielinski (5 items)

Cut Flowers

    • Erika Conrad (3 items)

    • Rachel Hatch (4 items)

    • Grace Kunze (6 items)

    • Addison Zielenieski (4 items)

STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics)

    • Abby Lewandowski

    • Colton Auger

    • Ella Szucs

    • Alexa Wolcott

    • Naomi Shepard

Cloverbud Exhibits

    • Eleanor Perl

    • Mary Harwood

    • Emily Harwood

    • Trinity Smith (2 items)

    • Abilene Foss

    • Owen Norton

    • Ashley Youngers

    • Madison Youngers

    • Izabelle Carmichael

    • Kaylee Powell

    • Charlotte Kirsch

Below are 4-H'ers who represented Wyoming County in the following events at the State Fair:

State Fair Fashion Revue

    • Caleigh Castlevetere

    • Genevieve Homac

    • Abigail Parker

    • Hannah Spicer

    • Rebekah Spicer

    • Natalie Standish

    • Margot Treadwell

    • Mary Zielinski

State Fair Produced in NYS Foods Presentation

    • Macy Boss

    • Alexa Wolcott

    • Elliana Wolcott

Teen Evaluators

    • Caleigh Castlevetere

    • Genevieve Homac

    • Abigail Parker

    • Mary Zielinski

    • Aurora Mysliwiec

County Booth Teen Leaders

    • Abigail Schreiber

    • Aurora Mysliwiec

    • Mary Zielinski

    • Caleigh Castlevetere

    • Genevieve Homac

    • Abigail Parker

    • Hannah Spicer

    • Rebekah Spicer

    • Natalie Standish

    • Margot Treadwell

Iron Chef Competition Wyoming County 4-Her’s

    • Abigail Schreiber

    • Caleigh Castlevetere

    • Abby Parker

    • Natalie Standish

Adult Volunteer Helper

    • Kay Swyers

The following Wyoming County 4-H’ers for received purple “Special Recognition” rosettes at the State Fair:

    • Nathan Perl – maple syrup

    • Danielle Herrick – basket

    • Abigail Schreiber – genealogy

    • Mary Jane Mathis – crocheted wool slouch hat

    • Emily Brown – knitted cable hat

    • Katie Fisher – lined Jacket

    • Katie Terry – prom dress

For more information about 4-H, call the CCE of Wyoming County 4-H office at (585) 786- 2251 or visit http://wyoming.cce.cornell.edu/

Top photos -- captions:

Top photo: Castile County Kids 4-H Club members and their First Place education booth at the Wyoming County Fair.

Second photo: Wyoming County 4-H'ers mannaquin model at the NY State Fair. First row: Margot Treadwell. Second row, seated from left: Hannah Spicer, Rebekah Spicer, Natalie Standish. From left, standing are: Mary Zielinski, Caleigh Castlevetere and Abby Parker.

Bottom photos -- captions:

Below: NYS Fair Produced in NYS Foods Contest participants, from left: Elliana Wolcott, Macy Boss and Alexa Wolcott.

Bottom: Wyoming County 4-H'ers who participated in the NYS Fair Iron Chef Competition, from left: Natalie Standish, Abigail Schreiber, Caleigh Castlevetere and Abby Parker.

2017_4-hers_fair_results_3_copy.jpg

2017_4-hers_fair_results_4_copy.jpg

Tuesday, September 19, 2017 at 1:17 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, announcements, Attica.

Press release

The Attica police and fire departments will be hosting a Child Safety Seat Check Station event from 5 to 8 p.m. Sept. 21 at the Police Department, 43 Exchange St., Attica. The program is supported by the Governors Traffic Safety Committee and promotes child passenger safety awareness and education.

Nationally certified technicians will complete a child safety seat check, and provide education on the proper use, maintenance and installation of the child restraint based upon the manufacturer’s instructions. They will also check for any recalls on all car seats and confirm with the parent or caregiver their knowledge and capabilities of child seat usage and proper installation.

If the car seat needs to be replaced due to damage, being outgrown or recalled, technicians can guide parents on where and how to buy a new seat. Additionally, if the parent or caregiver is unable to purchase a new safety seat, officials say the program could provide a replacement from the current inventory on hand.

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