Monday, March 6, 2017 at 9:46 am
posted by Howard Owens in letchworth, Sports.

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Pole vaulter Nate Crane is a team of one for Letchworth, so he trained with Batavia indoor track team this season.

In the pole vault he placed sixth in the NY Federation and fourth among state competitors at the state championships at the Ocean Breeze Athletic Complex in Staten Island. He cleared 14' 6" and will compete next weekend at the Indoor National Championships at the Armory in Manhattan.

Monday, March 6, 2017 at 9:00 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, agri-business, dairy, agriculture.

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Photo from Fay Benson, Cornell Small Dairy support specialist.

Press release:

Wanted: aspiring dairy farmers and dairy master graziers to stem the tide of retiring dairy farmers in New York State.

Cornell Small Dairy Support Specialist Fay Benson is recruiting participants for the New York edition of the Dairy Grazing Apprenticeship Program (DGA), the groundbreaking, nationally recognized apprenticeship program for the agricultural industry.

Modeled after apprenticeship programs such as those for developing a highly skilled level of experience for new plumbers and electricians, the DGA is recognized by the federal Department of Labor. 

The two-year DGA requires 4,000 hours of instruction, including 277 hours of online classes, and on-the-job training on farms approved for good agricultural practices and safety measures. The federally registered apprentices are paid on an established wage scale to work on an existing grazing dairy farm while they gain knowledge, skills, and early experience. The wage increases over time as skill level grows.

The New York apprentices and master graziers will work with Benson as the New York DGA education coordinator and a “job book” containing several hundred dairy industry topics to prepare the apprentice to successfully own, operate, or manage a grazing dairy farm business.

Apprentice candidates must be at least 18 years old; have a high school diploma or equivalent, e.g., GED or composite ACT score of at least 18; be physically able to do the work a farm requires; and have reliable transportation.

A master grazier must have at least five years experience with managed grazing or certified organic dairying an an interest in mentoring someone interested in dairy career entry. 

Master graziers often find their own apprenticeship candidates. In some cases, once the training is complete an apprentice stays on as a dedicated farm employee, becomes a farm partner, or eventually transitions into farm ownership.

Successful completion of the DGA provides the apprentice with a journeyman certificate recognized for college-level credit by the New York Department of Labor. The journeyman experience may help secure a beginning farmer loan with FSA (flexible spending account) or a bank.

The Cornell Dairy Farm Business Summary has shown that dairies that use grazing are more profitable than non-grazing dairies of similar size. Grazing is a way to lower fee costs while maintaining animal health and agricultural stewardship.

The Dairy Grazing Apprenticeship program that began in Wisconsin in 2009 is now approved in nine states: Iowa, Maine, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Vermont and Wisconsin.

Those interested in becoming an apprentice or serving as a dairy master grazier may apply online at www.dga-national.org; for assistance, contact Abbie Teeter at ajt248@cornell.edu, (607) 391-2660, ext. 412. 

Once registered, the apprentices and dairy master graziers can search the entries across the nine-state region to initiate discussion of a possible apprenticeship opportunity.

To learn more about the New York Dairy Grazing Apprenticeship, contact Benson at (607) 391-2660 or via email at afb3@cornell.edu. Benson is project manager for the New York Organic Dairy Program, an educator with the Cornell University South Central New York Regional Team, coordinator of the New York Soil Health Trailer, and a member of the New York Crop Insurance Education Team.

Friday, March 3, 2017 at 4:55 pm

Press release:

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) welcomes angler observations as it begins its angler diary program on the Genesee River in Allegany and Wyoming counties. 

The diarist program aims to record dates for trout and bass fishing trips on the Genesee River from the Pennsylvania line downstream through Letchworth State Park from March 1 through Oct. 31.

"Angler participation in this program is greatly appreciated and will help us to evaluate the Genesee River's fishery quality," said Regional Fisheries Manager Mike Clancy. "This is a great opportunity for anglers to contribute observations and help shape future fishery management actions."

Those who fish the Genesee River (even once) and are able to contribute observations by keeping a fishing diary for DEC can contact the Region 9 Fisheries Office at (716) 372-6372 or via e-mail at fwfish9@dec.ny.gov.

Friday, March 3, 2017 at 4:30 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, Warsaw, medical, education, WCCH.

Press release:

The Rural Area Health Education Center (R-AHEC) recently received close to $24,000 in funding for housing for medical students. The grant is from the William F. Thiel Trust, a fund held by the Community Foundation for Greater Buffalo. 

R-AHEC Chief Executive Officer says the funds will be offered to Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (LECOM) primary care students beginning in July.

Funds under the award are intended to provide housing for students during each of their four-week long competency-based clinical rotations. These students would reside at the William F. Thiel Hospitality House in Warsaw, which is located directly behind the Wyoming County Community Hospital (WCCH) and is owned and operated by R-AHEC. 

Students would be immersed in rural medicine and receive opportunities to learn about the community in which they serve. WCCHS and LECOM have created a crucial partnership to become an academic training site for medical students with a primary care focus. 

“We are very excited about this new partnership and the opportunity to work with LECOM and WCCHS,” Huff said. “This project has the capability to be very beneficial to both the students and Wyoming County residents. We are very grateful that the William F. Thiel Trust was able to make this project possible.”

“This endeavor will encourage and foster an academic environment at WCCHS and improve the quality of care in the county,” said Medical Director of Acute and Non-Skilled Nursing Facility Medical Operations at WCCH Dr. Bilal Ahmed.

“The college has core competency-based clinical rotations at WCCHS and some area primary care sites will serve as teaching sites to its students. We also hope that this training will be helpful in our future physician recruitment and retention efforts.”

Ahmed is also a professor of clinical medicine and an assistant program director for the University of Rochester School of Medicine-Internal Medicine Residency Program, plus he's the associate medical director at Highland Hospital, Rochester.

“LECOM is committed to offering clinical training opportunities in rural hospital systems,” said Dr. Richard Terry. “We are appreciative of the support of the foundation for subsidizing housing for our students while on rotation there.

"Collaborative, innovative efforts such as this will no doubt encourage medical students to pursue training in primary care and consider practicing in rural, underserved regions of NYS.”

Terry is the assistant dean of regional clinical education and chief academic officer of LECOM at ArnotHealth Inc. in Elmira.

In addition to the housing scholarship award, R-AHEC has been awarded funds through the Trust to support the exploration of expanding capacity and flexibility at the William F. Thiel Hospitality House and for the R-AHEC P.U.L.S.E. (Providing Unique Learning/Shadowing Experiences) Academy. P.U.L.S.E is a health career exploration program for high school students. The total award amount from the for all three projects is $55,338.

R-AHEC was formed in 1999 as a nonprofit organization, serving a 12-county region of Western New York (WNY). Its mission is “to improve health and healthcare through education.” The organization focuses on health workforce development, preceptor development/student housing, pipeline programming, and rural healthcare technology infrastructure development. 

Additionally, R-AHEC operates the WNY Rural Broadband Healthcare Network (RBHN), providing subsidies to nonprofit healthcare facilities through a point-to-point fiber optic network. For more information, visit www.r-ahec.org or www.wnyrbhn.org.

WCCH is a healthcare provider in Wyoming County with a workforce of more than 500 employees. The county-owned facility offers acute care, long term care, ambulatory surgery, rehabilitation and inpatient and outpatient behavioral health. For more information, visit www.wcchs.net.

LECOM is based in Erie, Pa., and is the largest medical school in the United States with a satellite campus in Elmira, as well as campuses in Pennsylvania and Florida. The majority of LECOM graduates become primary care physicians. For more information, visit www.lecom.edu.

The Community Foundation for Greater Buffalo, a 501(c)3 organization, was established in 1919 to enhance and encourage long-term philanthropy in the WNY community. 

The Foundation’s mission is: Connecting people, ideas and resources to improve lives in WNY. For more than 95 years, the Community Foundation has made the most of the generosity of individuals, families, foundations and organizations who entrust assets to its care. For more information, visit www.cfgb.org.

Friday, March 3, 2017 at 3:43 pm

Press release:

Congressman Chris Collins recently released the following statement announcing this year’s Congressional Art Competition. He also is encouraging local high school students in New York’s 27th District to participate.

“The Congressional Art Competition is a great opportunity for hardworking high school students to showcase their work to the hundreds of thousands of people who visit the Capitol each year,” Collins said.

“There are incredibly talented artists throughout NY-27. I look forward to seeing this year’s submissions and the opportunity to welcome the winning artist to our nation’s capital.”

The competition, now in its 35th year, is open to all high school students who live in New York’s 27th Congressional District. Last year there were more than 90 submissions. The winning artist will receive a round trip flight to Washington, D.C., to see their artwork in the U.S. Capitol, where it will be on display for one year.

Submissions are due to either of Congressman Collins’ two district offices no later than 5 p.m. April 4. A reception and award ceremony will be held April 8 at the Roz Steiner Art Gallery, located on the Genesee Community College campus in Batavia. Local high schools have been notified regarding contest rules and submission guidelines.    

Interested students should see their art teacher for details or contact Chris Catt from Congressman Collins’ office at (585) 519-4002.

Friday, March 3, 2017 at 12:47 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Attica, Perry, Warsaw, Middlebury.

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The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun March 2.

Chivonne Gheorghe, who committed a crime in Attica, pled guilty to criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fourth degree, a Class C felony. Sentencing is scheduled July 6.

Roy Lawrence, who committed a crime in Perry, pled guilty to criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony. Sentencing is scheduled April 6. He is held in the Wyoming County Jail without bail.

Patrick Wheeler, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to five years probation and restitution of $60, which has been paid. He was convicted of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class D felony.

Matthew Hadfield, who is accused of a crime in Middlebury, had his case adjourned to April 6.

Jonathan Bucknam, who is accused of a crime in Perry, had his case adjourned to April 6. 

Heidi Hopkins, who committed a crime in Perry, pled guilty to criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony. Sentencing is scheduled April 6. She is held in the Wyoming County Jail without bail.

Dutch Bryndle, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to attempted tampering with physical evidence and driving while ability impaired by drugs, both as misdemeanors. Bryndle was sentenced to a one year conditional discharge on both, paid a $1,000 fine, and his license was revoked.

Richard Greene Jr., who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class D felony as a second felony offender. He was released on pretrial release.

Jonathan Bucknam, who is accused of a crime in Warsaw, had his case adjourned to April 6.

Kristen Bartholomew, who is accused of a crime in Warsaw, had her case adjourned to April 27 for motions.

Tiffany Baker, who committed a crime in Warsaw, successfully completed interim probation. She was sentenced on the reduced charged of promoting prison contraband in the second degree, a misdemeanor to three years probation, and fees and surcharges.

Jennifer Galioto, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, was in court for a violation of probation appearance. The case has been adjourned to March 10.

The following are from State Correctional Facilities in Attica.

Jonathan Smith had his case adjourned to April 27 for conference.

Billyray Staton had his case adjourned to April 27 for conference.

The following are from State Correctional Facilities in Attica and were in court before Mohun Feb. 28.

Mark Maussner had his case adjourned to March 7.

Jerry McLamore was in court for a bench trial. The decision has been reserved and the case is adjourned to March 15. After the hearing of a trial or the argument of a motion a judge might not immediately deliver a decision, but instead take time to review evidence and the law and deliver a decision at a later time, usually in a written form, thus reserve decision.

Friday, March 3, 2017 at 11:59 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Perry, Arcade, Warsaw.
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     Tylor J. Phinney

Tylor J. Phinney, 21, of Cheektowaga, was arrested March 1 following an investigation of an assault that happened on July 3 in the parking lot at the Jam in the Valley Concert, Varysburg. He is charged with assault in the second degree. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say Phinney is accused of striking an Angola man in the face with a beer bottle causing serious injuries. It was also said that Phinney had fled the scene of the incident. However, his DNA was obtained from the bottle, which was recovered from inside the victim’s vehicle following the assault. Phinney is currently on probation out of Wyoming County from other unrelated charges and was released back to the Wyoming County pretrial probation program. He is due in the Town of Sheldon Court at a later date. Wyoming County Probation and detectives from the Erie County Sheriff’s Department assisted with the investigation. 

Ryan J. Mosher, no age provided, of Perry, was charged March 1 with harassment in the second degree and endangering the welfare of a child. Mosher is accused of getting into a physical altercation with a female with a child present. He was released on his own recognizance.

Evan W. Hettinger, 33, of Belfast, was arrested March 1 on a warrant out of Wyoming County Family Court for failure to obey a family court support order. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say Hettinger was located in the Town of Arcade and taken into custody. He was put in Wyoming County Jail until the next available Wyoming County Family Court date.

Dakota Jurek, 23, of Delevan, was arrested Feb. 28 on a warrant out of Wyoming County Family Court for failure to obey a child support order. Deputies say Jurek was arrested in Arcade and put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $1,000 bail. He was due in Family Court March 1 or the next available date for Family Court.

Thursday, March 2, 2017 at 9:57 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, drugs, Perry, Attica, Warsaw, Arcade, DTF.

Two Perry residents were arrested recently for allegedly selling narcotics in Wyoming County, according to the Wyoming County Drug Task Force.

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     Sarah Ingalls

Sarah Ingalls, 22, was charged Feb. 23 with two counts of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree and two counts of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fifth degree. 

Ingalls is accused of selling lisdexamfetamine and methylphenidate on two different occasions last year in the Village of Perry.

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Kristen Bartholomew

Also on Feb. 23, Kristen Bartholomew, 36, was charged with criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fourth degree and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fourth degree. 

Bartholomew is accused of selling Suboxone last year in the Village of Warsaw.

Both are currently free on bail.

The Wyoming County Drug Task Force includes members from the Sheriff’s Office, as well as the Arcade, Attica, Perry and Warsaw police departments.

Suspected illegal drug activity can be reported to the confidential drug tip line at (585) 786-8965.

Wednesday, March 1, 2017 at 6:56 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, mental health.

Sen. Patrick M. Gallivan (R-C-I, Elma) has introduced legislation which would require the New York State Office of Mental Health to maintain the Western New York Children’s Psychiatric Center (WNYCPC) as a separate and distinct entity both organizationally and physically. The legislation would prevent it from being merged with any other facility.  

The legislation (S4630) will amend the mental hygiene law and is the latest effort by Gallivan to stop plans by the Office of Mental Health from closing the West Seneca facility and transferring adolescent patients to the Buffalo Psychiatric Center. 

“We have repeatedly asked the Office of Mental Health to reconsider its plans to merge the Children’s Psychiatric Center with the Buffalo Psychiatric Center,” Gallivan said. “The West Seneca facility is rated among the best in the nation in the treatment of children and teens in need of behavioral health services.

"The proposal to move these vulnerable children into the same facility as adults is not based on clinical science and will jeopardize their treatment. While the proposed merger may save money, it simply is not fair to patients or their families.”   

Assemblyman Michael Kearns (D, West Seneca) will introduce similar legislation in the Assembly. 

“For several years senators Gallivan, Robert G. Ortt, the Western New York (WNY) delegation and I have asked the Office of Mental Health and Governor (Andrew) Cuomo to stop the merging of the WNY Children’s Psychiatric Center with Buffalo Psychiatric Center,” Kearns said.

“For some unexplained reason, they continue to move forward with this action, despite WNY Children’s Psychiatric Center rating the best of its kind in the state. Medical evidence clearly shows, when it comes to mental health, children need to be separate from adults to receive the best care.

"Since the Office of Mental Health and governor seem to be ignoring these facts, and the pleas from patients, parents and the community to keep the facility open in West Seneca, I’m proud to introduce and advocate for this legislation in the Assembly.”

Ortt, (R-C-I, North Tonawanda) Chairman of the Senate Committee on Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities, is cosponsoring the legislation. 

"We have listened to countless former patients, families, employees and mental health professionals,” Ortt said. “Each group has expressed grave concerns over the potential implications that such a merger of children into an adult setting will have on these vulnerable children as well as the precedent it will set for the future.

"Our foremost concern remains the children facing severe emotional, psychological, and physical trauma who have experienced negative adult behaviors. And it simply does not make sense to move forward with this merger."  

In January, Gallivan sent a letter to the governor urging him to keep the facility open. A bipartisan group of senators and assemblymen from across WNY and the Finger Lakes region signed the letter in support.   

Over the past several years, former patients, family members of patients, workers, community activists, and academics have pushed to keep the WNYCPC open. They argue the tranquil surrounding provided at the West Seneca campus is important for the children who are undergoing significant mental trauma and the families desperately trying to protect these children from danger.

Wednesday, March 1, 2017 at 6:39 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, 4-H, Warsaw, Castile.

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Hannah Holmes, of Warsaw

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Ezra Conklin, of Castile

Press release (photos submitted):

How to make skunk spray for a dog, the evolution of the John Deere combine, healthy living, lamb care, horse safety, GMOs, and maple syrup production – these are just a few of the topics 167 youth gave presentations on at this year’s 4-H Public Presentations Days.

The event, sponsored by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Wyoming County (CCE), was held at Warsaw Central High School Feb. 8 and 18.

The 4-H Public Presentations Program helps youth enhance their public speaking skills. Additionally, they learn the research process, gain confidence and self-esteem, while developing the ability to think and speak in front of a group of people about something that interests them.

4-H’ers had the opportunity to organize, prepare, and present a demonstration, an illustrated talk, a formal speech, a recitation, or a dramatic interpretation before an audience. The kids were offered constructive feedback and positive reinforcement by more than 17 4-H volunteers and community members. 

4-H teens were also encouraged to take advantage of an “interview” option – the opportunity to prepare a resume and participate in a formal interview. Junior and senior outstanding presenters were awarded an opportunity to advance to the next level of competition. Western District 4-H Presentations will be hosted by Erie County 4-H and held April 1 in Buffalo.

To find out more about the program or 4-H, call (585) 786- 2251 or visit http://wyoming.cce.cornell.edu/

Wednesday, March 1, 2017 at 5:10 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, Congressman Collins, government.

Congressman Chris Collins (NY-27) has released the following statement after President Donald Trump's address to Congress:

"Americans across the country tonight (Feb. 28) witnessed a leader committed to restoring American greatness," Collins said. "This past November, voters elected a change agent.

"In his first 40 days in office, President Trump is already delivering the results Americans, especially those in my district of Western New York, have demanded. Whether it's fighting to return American jobs stolen by countries like Mexico and China, or securing our porous borders, President Trump has shown the world he is a president of action.

"If we are going to restore the hope of the American Dream for our children and grandchildren, tough choices need to be made. Unlike our last president, President Trump acknowledged that reality, and outlined a clear vision for us to overcome the challenges we will face. We are going to fight for the American worker, respect the rule of law, and harness the endless potential all Americans possess.

"I look forward to President Trump implementing the change Western New Yorkers voted for, and will continue to fight here in Congress for policies that improve the lives of my constituents."

Wednesday, March 1, 2017 at 2:31 pm

Chelsie Simonds, 24, of Batavia, and Ronald Sachanowski, 31, of Silver Springs, were charged Feb. 27 with endangering the welfare of a child. On Feb. 27 Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies responded to a home on Route 19A in the Town of Castile to assist with an overdose call. During the investigation, deputies say they had discovered both Simonds and Sachanowski had been using an illegal substance in the home while their 2-year-old child was present. Both are due in the Town of Castile Court at a later date. Castile Fire and Rescue assisted at the scene.

Linda L. Hotchkiss, 47, of Perry, was charged Feb. 22 with forgery in the third degree by the Livingston County Sheriff’s Department. She is due in Leicester Town Court at a later date.

William A. Roll, 57, and Jennifer L. Mather, 43, both of Attica, were arrested Feb. 25 in connection with a violent domestic incident on Washington Street in the Village of Attica. Attica Police responded to the Washington Street home around 9 p.m. Feb. 25. Roll was charged with assault in the third degree and put in Wyoming County Jail on $500 cash bail or $2,500 bond. Mather was charged with harassment in the second degree and physical contact. She was released on her own recognizance with a refrain from offensive conduct order of protection. Both are due at 10 a.m. March 13 in Attica Village Court. Assisting at the scene was the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office and the New York State Police.

Kaija Wadsworth, no age provided, of Pittsford, was charged Feb. 26 with speed in zone, driving while intoxicated, driving with a BAC of .08 percent or more, and refusal to take a breath test. Wadsworth was stopped in the Village of Perry for allegedly speeding. During the investigation officers say they smelled an alcoholic beverage coming from the car. Wadsworth allegedly failed field sobriety testing and refused to blow into a pre-screen device. A chemical test was administered at the Warsaw Police Department, which allegedly showed a BAC of .09 percent. Wadsworth is due in Perry Village Court March 14.

Zachary W. Blackmon, 30, of Perry, was charged Feb. 27 with speed not reasonable and prudent, following too closely, driving while intoxicated, driving with a BAC of .08 percent or greater, and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies responded to a two car accident on Route 39, Castile, where, during their investigation, found one of the drivers allegedly intoxicated. Deputies say Blackmon was traveling southbound on Route 39 when he struck another vehicle. Following roadside field sobriety testing, Blackmon was arrested for DWI. He was taken to the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office where he allegedly provided a positive breath sample for alcohol. He is due in the Town of Castile Court March 20.

Sabrina A. Dietz, 33, of Nunda, was charged Feb. 26 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the third degree, and use of a portable electronic device. Dietz was stopped in the Town of Perry after a Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputy allegedly saw her driving while using a portable electronic device. During the stop, she was allegedly found to have a suspended license due to a failure to answer a summons in the Town of Covington. She is due in the Town of Perry Court at a later date.

Melissa A. Sachanowski, 33, of Orangeville, was charged Feb. 20 with failure to keep right, failure to dim high beams, and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree. Sachanowski was stopped on Route 77, Sheldon, after deputies allegedly saw her failing to maintain her driving lane numerous times and failing to dim her high beams to oncoming traffic. Following a roadside investigation, deputies say she was in possession of Subutex, a controlled substance similar to Suboxone. She is due in the Town of Sheldon Court at a later date.

Wednesday, March 1, 2017 at 1:49 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, crime, Silver Springs, child porn.
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      Ronald Caryl

Ronald Caryl, a 24-year-old Silver Springs man, was arrested and charged yesterday with receipt of child pornography.

According to Assistant U.S. Attorney Aaron J. Mango, Caryl began communicating with a 23-year-old Nashville, Tenn., woman on MeetMe.com, a social networking service. 

Documents state that during the conversation, the two began to discuss Caryl providing the woman with $300 to have sex with her.

Officials say the woman wrote: “just $300 and u do what u want to me,” to which Caryl replied, “do you have a young girl who could join I’ll pay more…you into young girls?"

The woman responded, “as long as they r 18 and older.”

The defendant responded “Ya I meant younger I’ll pay 6000.”

The woman replied, “I can’t put things in her mouth she gets sick she’s disabled.”

The defendant went on to say, “show me your daughter.”

The woman then allegedly sent a picture to the defendant.

Caryl continued to press the woman to send naked pictures of her 1-year-old daughter.

Officials say a MeetMe.com staff member identified the possible endangerment of a minor and illegal content and notified the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC).

On Feb. 2, the NCMEC notified the FBI, who then traced the content to an IP address allegedly belonging to Caryl.

Caryl was arrested Tuesday and held pending a detention hearing at 2:30 p.m. Thursday.

Caryl faces a minimum of five years in prison with a maximum of 20 years.

Assisting the FBI in the case included the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Department, the Cheektowaga Police Department, and the Niagara County Sheriff’s Office.

Wednesday, March 1, 2017 at 1:43 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, weather, wind, news.

Hang onto your hats folks, the National Weather Service in Buffalo (NWS) has issued a high wind warning for Wyoming and surrounding counties until 7 a.m. Thursday. 

From late this afternoon through early Thursday morning winds will be coming out of the west at 25 to 35 mph with gusts up to 60 mph.

Strong wind gusts may cause damage to trees and property, as well as power lines resulting in localized power outages, authorities say. Additionally, the NWS advises extra caution for those motorists in high profile vehicles.

A high wind warning is issued when sustained winds of 40 mph are expected for at least an hour, with gusts of 58 mph or greater at any time.

Tuesday, February 28, 2017 at 10:36 am
posted by Howard Owens in Perry, Sports, basketball, news.

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If the Perry Yellowjackets win a sectional title this Friday, it won't be because Oakfield-Alabama didn't work hard to try and spoil their so-far-undefeated season.

The Hornets were in the game, played in Avon, until halfway through the final quarter when foul trouble took two starters off the court and Perry was able to finally pull away for a 78-63 win.

The Yellowjackets are a bigger team with Tyler Cowie, at 6' 3", 180 pounds, and Dan Elliott, 6' 4", 190 pounds, in the post, and a nearly unstoppable shot creator in Austin Croll at guard, but O-A got into their heads early, disrupting their offense with tight, aggressive coverage that led to several turnovers on steals, penalties and mental errors.

"What I noticed is a lot of teams kind of backed off them, hesitant or concerned about getting blown out, but we can’t back off," said Hornets Head Coach Ryan Stehlar. "We have to use our speed, our defense, and our intensity, so I wasn’t going to change our game plan. If we were going to go out, we were going to go out our way."

The Hornets had a lead of 16-13 at the end of the first quarter and 32-31 at the end of the half. Perry jumped out early in the third quarter, led most of the way and were head by about by five points early in the fourth quarter when O-A rallied a bit to get a single-digit lead with about five minutes left. That would be the Hornet's last lead of the night. 

"I've seen them several times this season and those guys play hard," said Perry Head Coach Phil Wyant. "We knew it was gong to be tough. They scrap, they battle, they play a lot of guys who can put it on the floor and are willing to shoot and that presented a tough match-up, especially when they’re making tough shots."

Reice Woodward and Dalton Carlsen fouled out and either because that took some defensive pressure off the Yellowjackets, or O-A fatigue or just the great talent on the Perry team, the Yellowjackets quickly pulled away and never let the Hornets get back in the game the rest of the way.

Cowie finished with 32 points, 14 rebounds, and nine blocked shots. Croll scored 24 points.

"Austin and Tyler, not only are they great players, but they do whatever it takes to find the open guy, make a play for a teammate, and get it done on the defensive end," Wyant said. "They were down there guarding two of their better players. Yeah, Austin and Tyler, I'm glad they're on our team, that's for sure."

Also for Perry, Spencer Owen scored 12 points and had 10 rebounds.

For O-A, Tylor Ohlson scored 18 points, including hitting three three-pointers. Woodward scored 15 and Carlsen scored 15.

Perry faces Cuba-Rushford on Friday for the Section V Class C title. 

"We know it's going to be a tough challenge," Wyant said.

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To purchase prints, click here.

Monday, February 27, 2017 at 4:10 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, accident, news, Cowlesville, Bennington.

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Photo submitted by the New York State Police

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    Nicholas Price

Nicholas Price, 29, of Batavia, was arrested in connection with a hit-and-run accident that happened Jan. 27 in the Town of Bennington.

According to the original report, around 11:50 a.m. a black Hyundai Accent was traveling eastbound when it went off the road on Route 354 in the Hamlet of Cowlesville. 

The car was said to have struck a mailbox, then a red GMC Sierra pickup truck before coming to rest against a tree. 

The driver is accused of fleeing the scene and driving the Hyundai eastbound with extensive damage to the front end.

On Feb. 17, New York State Troopers responded to a medical call on Halstead Road in the Town of Batavia. While at the scene, troopers say they saw a black Hyundai Accent with front end damage similar to what was reported in the Cowlesville incident. 

Upon further investigation, and evidence collected from the scene, officers say they were able to match the suspect vehicle to the original accident.

Subsequently, Price was charged Feb. 24 with criminal mischief in the fourth degree, leaving the scene of property damage accident, reckless driving, moved from lane unsafely, and drove across hazard markings.

He is due in the Town of Bennington Court sometime in March.

See related: Police seeking information in hit and run collision in Cowlesville

Monday, February 27, 2017 at 10:21 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Eagle, Arcade, Gainesville, Middlebury, Perry, Warsaw.

wyco_court_stock_photo.jpg

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun Feb. 23.

Alan Hartman Sr., who committed a crime in Eagle, was sentenced to two-and-one-half to five years in prison and two years post-release supervision, and fees and surcharges. He was convicted of unlawful manufacture of methamphetamine in the third degree, a Class D felony. The sentence is to run consecutively to his current term.

Edward Gauthier II, who committed a crime in Arcade, pled guilty to aggravated family offense, a Class E felony. Sentencing is scheduled for May 18. An order of protection was also issued for eight years.

Nicole Fisher, who committed a crime in Arcade, was sentenced to five years probation on the conviction of attempted criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fourth degree, a Class D felony.

Tyler McMurray, who committed a crime in Eagle, was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison and fees and surcharges on the conviction of tampering with physical evidence, a Class E felony.

Amanda Washburn, who committed a crime in Gainesville, was sentenced to three years probation on the conviction of two counts of petit larceny, a misdemeanor.

Cody Eaton, who committed a crime in Middlebury, successfully completed interim probation and was sentenced on the reduced charge of driving while intoxicated. He will serve three years probation, pay a $1,000 fine, have his driver’s license revoked, and is ordered to install an ignition interlock device, plus pay fees and surcharges.

Clifford Murch, who is accused of a crime in Perry, pled not guilty to rape in the second degree, a Class D felony; and endangering the welfare of a child, a misdemeanor. An order of protection was served. Motions are scheduled April 27. Bail was set at $20,000.

Dakota Ribbeck, who committed a crime in Perry, pled guilt to rape in the third degree, a Class E felony. Sentencing is scheduled for May 18.

Chad Main, who is accused of a crime in Warsaw, pled not guilty to: aggravated unlicensed operation in the first degree; driving while intoxicated and driving while intoxicated per se, both as Class E felonies; and operating a motor vehicle without a court-ordered ignition interlock device, a Class A misdemeanor. The Per Se law is based not on the observations of the arresting police officer, but the results obtained from a breath alcohol tester. It is this result that dictates the offense as well potential certain legal presumptions. Motions are scheduled April 27. He was released on his own recognizance.

Catherine Miller, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to five years probation, 250 hours of community service, $2,189 in restitution, and fees and surcharges. She was convicted of welfare fraud in the fourth degree, a Class E felony.

Crystal Lawrence, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to three years probation and a $50 DNA fee. Restitution has been paid in full. She was convicted of welfare fraud in the fifth degree and petit larceny.

Kimberly White, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, was sentenced to 180 days in jail on the violation of conditional discharge.

Monday, February 27, 2017 at 9:56 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Warsaw, Attica, news.

Rebecca L. Reding, 38, of Attica, was charged Feb. 9 with welfare fraud in the third degree and offering a false instrument to file in the first degree; both are felonies. Following an investigation by the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office and the Department of Social Services, Reding is accused of failing to report rental income from a property she owned. Subsequently, she is accused of receive more than $5,000 in benefits between March 2013 and March 2014, to which she was not entitled. She is due in the Town of Warsaw Court at a later date.

Tomy Lee Velasquez, 24, of Warsaw, was charged Feb. 26 with one count of obstructing governmental administration in the second degree, a Class A misdemeanor; false personation, a Class B misdemeanor; aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the second degree; use of a rental vehicle without an ignition interlock device; and loud muffler. Velasquez is accused of intentionally giving false information as to his identity to the Le Roy Police. His license was allegedly suspended due to a previous driving while intoxicated conviction. He is due in Le Roy Court March 20.

Monday, February 27, 2017 at 9:34 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Warsaw, Perry.
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   Bradley Broadbent

Bradley J. Broadbent’s criminal activity dates back to July 2012 in Genesee County. 

On Jan. 10, the 37-year-old Batavia man was found guilty on drug charges following a three-day jury trial in Wyoming County Court. 

On Feb. 23, he was sentenced to a determinate sentence of 10 years in prison with one-and-one-half years of post-release supervision on each count of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree and one count of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree, to run concurrently.

On Jan. 14, 2016, Broadbent possessed and sold 13 bags of heroin laced with the horse tranquilizer Xylaxine to a confidential informant in the Village of Perry. 

He was arrested in June on those charges during the Wyoming County Drug Task Force Operation Spring Sweep

According to District Attorney Donald O’Geen, prior to his sentencing last week he admitted that he should be sentenced as a second felony drug offender with a prior violent felony conviction. 

In 2012, Broadbent was indicted on three counts of criminal mischief in the fourth degree, criminal trespass, burglary in the second degree, and petit larceny. 

In February last year he was charged with false personation, criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree, criminal use of drug paraphernalia and possession of hypodermic needles, following a traffic stop on Route 33, Stafford.

In addition to his charges in Wyoming County, he was also arrested in June by the Genesee County Local Drug Enforcement Task Force on charges stemming from an April 24 incident in the Genesee County Jail.

“Heroin is an extremely dangerous drug that is highly addictive,” O’Geen said. “This case demonstrates how dangerous heroin is. To sell heroin, let alone lace it with a horse tranquilizer is reckless.

“On a weekly basis our office sees the devastating effects of heroin on our community. The sentence handed down today sends a clear message that those defendants that deal heroin and prey on people’s addictions will be brought to justice and held accountable.”

See related: Drug dealer found guilty of selling heroin laced with a horse tranquilizer

Sunday, February 26, 2017 at 1:07 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, fire, Arcade.

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File photo

Although the house has since been razed, money was the prime mover for the March 2015 back-to-back fires on Liberty Street in the Village of Arcade.

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     Jody Nelligan

“She lied about the fire under oath when she was actually deposed,” said Wyoming County Assistant District Attorney Vincent Hemming in court transcripts. “This was someone that started a fire in a house, with children in that house, for money.” According to court transcripts dated Feb. 2, Jody Nelligan, 40 of Orchard Park, admitted to the Wyoming County Probation Department of intentionally setting fire to the home to “get the renter’s insurance policy.” Additionally, up until her guilty plea Oct. 27, Nelligan “continuously lied about this fire for a substantial period of time.”

Hemming also noted that Nelligan has no drug or alcohol issue “whatsoever,” but did ask the Court to consider incarceration as part of any probationary sentence.

The matter was seen before Wyoming County Judge Michael Mohun.

On March 23, 2015 a fire broke out in the basement of a Liberty Street home in Arcade. Arcade, Strykersville, Yorkshire, Chaffee-Sardinia, and Harris Corners fire departments were on the scene for three hours, under the direction of Fire Chief in Charge, Arcade Fire Chief Tom Beirsdorf putting out the fire. Standing by at empty stations were Bliss and Sheldon fire departments.

The following day, several surrounding fire companies responded to the home for a second time for a fire that began in a second-floor bedroom closet. Following the fires, Nelligan, another adult, and four children were being assisted by the Red Cross and family members. The four family cats were also saved. 

Arcade, Yorkshire, Harris Corners, Bliss, Strykersville, Chaffee-Sardinia, and Sheldon fire companies were on the scene for five hours battling the blaze. They were assisted at the scene by Wyoming County Emergency Services, Wyoming County Sheriff’s Department, Arcade Electric, and the Arcade Police Department. Standing by at empty stations were Bliss and Holland fire departments.

On July 1 of last year, Nelligan was charged with setting both fires – two counts of arson in the second degree, a Class B felony; and two counts of perjury in the first degree, a Class D felony.

In October she had pled guilty and on Feb. 2 she was sentenced.

At the time of her sentencing, Nelligan was facing up to six months in jail and five years probation.

Nelligan’s attorney, Andrew Pace, reiterated to the Court that she has taken full responsibility for the fires. He also quotes a probation officer as saying she is “extremely apologetic, very distraught with what happened, and since we left court at our last appearance, she has taken steps to help remediate what can only be described as a myriad of mental health issues.”

Additionally, she has no criminal record and is working with a mental health counselor weekly, a psychotherapist monthly, and her primary care physician to coordinate all of her medications.

Pace stressed to the Court in his memoranda how “essential it was that we try and get Jody back to her family,” because she is the primary caregiver of not only her four children, but her sickly father and her husband as well.

When Mohun gave Nelligan an opportunity to speak, she again apologized for the fires and told the Court it would not happen “ever again.”

“I am a mom and I have four children,” Nelligan said. “Two of my children are special need children and they need my care daily and I have my father, who I’m a caregiver for. He’s 70 years old and I would really hope that you would impose probation on me and not jail time because I need to be home with my family.”

Mohun then asked the defendant if the family she spoke of was the same family that was in the house when she set fire to it. To which she had said her father was not present at the time of the fires, but her children were.

“And now you’re asking not to put you in jail because you want to be a mother to these children that you put at risk?” Mohun questioned.

Nelligan admitted that it was a “bad choice,” to which Mohun said it was “probably a most horrific choice that anyone could make, let alone a mother.”

Due to the fact that she is working with a counselor and receiving medication for her illness, this gave the judge pause. Mohun noted that if there was no constraint on sentencing, a state prison sentence may have been appropriate.

“You put the lives of your children at risk,” Mohun said. “For what? For money. It’s an extraordinary tale that is told in this prosecution where you put money ahead of your children’s safety. You put them at risk. That is certainly not a motherly instinct.”

With that said, however, Mohun agreed with Pace that she has taken steps to “come clean” and did not think her children should “suffer any more for your criminal behavior.”

“Every day you are with those children is a blessing, and I hope you don’t put them at risk anymore because this is a revocable sentence,” Mohun said.

According to New York Penal Law 60.01 a revocable sentence  shall be deemed a tentative one to the extent that it may be altered or revoked in accordance with the provisions of the article under which it was imposed, but for all other purposes shall be deemed to be a final judgment of conviction.  

Nelligan was convicted of attempted arson in the third degree and sentenced to five years probation, $26,075.55 in restitution, and fees and surcharges.

See related: Unknown cause sparked the first fire at a Liberty Street home in ArcadeArsonist responsible for setting two fires at a Liberty Street home, ArcadeAn Orchard Park woman pled guilty to setting fire to an Arcade home last year

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