Friday, February 10, 2017 at 2:54 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, Sports, events, Perry, wrestling.

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Photos by Ron Strain​.

Gilead School of Discipleship, Perry, established its first Varsity Wrestling team this year.  

Ryan Caudill (99) triumphed this past Saturday at the Section V Class B Sectional Tournament at Keshequa CS. He finished first, over Kade Slayton, of Avoca, as Gilead’s first ever Sectional champion; Silas Guesno (106) finished third.

Both are moving on to the state qualifier, today and tomorrow in Brockport.  

A total of 16 schools competed in the Section V Class B sectionals.  

Information submitted by Eric Caudill.

Thursday, February 9, 2017 at 4:07 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Beaver Meadows, Java.

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Photo and information submitted by Beaver Meadow.

Beaver Meadow is seeking the public’s assistance with the next steps in planning its Nature Play area on the grounds.

A focus group led by Rusty Keeler, an artist, designer, and author of “Natural Playscapes” will be held from 1:30 to 3 p.m. at the Nature Center, 1610 Welch Road, Java Center. 

For more information contact the center’s Director of Education Lauren Makeyenko at ljmak33@gmail.com or (585) 457-3228.

This project was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 35,000 museums. To learn more, visit www.imls.gov

Wednesday, February 8, 2017 at 1:06 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Warsaw, Perry.

Michael W. Smith, 48, of Warsaw, was charged Feb. 6 with uninspected motor vehicle, consumption of alcohol in a motor vehicle, driving while intoxicated, and aggravated driving while intoxicated with a BAC of .18 or more. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies stopped to check on a vehicle that had pulled over to the side of the road on Suckerbook Road, Perry, to see if the driver was all right. Following a conversation, deputies say the driver showed apparent signs of intoxication. Smith was asked to perform field sobriety testing, which he subsequently allegedly failed. He was taken to the Sheriff’s Office and submitted a breath test which allegedly revealed he had a BAC of .33 percent, more than four times the legal limit. He is due in the Town of Perry Court March 1.

Shannon J. McDonald, 39, no address provided, was charged by the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office and the Department of Social Services with non-support of a child in the second degree. Sheriff official say McDonald failed to make regular court ordered child support payments although he was employed during this time. He was charged with one count for a case in which he owes $4,595.94 and another count for a case in which he owes $25,561.56. He was put in Wyoming County Jail on $1,500 bail.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017 at 1:01 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, assault, news, Warsaw.
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      Adam J. Aguado

A Cicero man incarcerated in the Wyoming County Jail pled guilty to assault charges Tuesday in Wyoming County Court.

Adam J. Aguado, 27, pled guilty to attempted assault in the second degree, a Class E felony, and two counts of obstructing governmental administration in the second degree, a Class A misdemeanor. He also pled guilty to a second indictment of obstructing governmental administration in the second degree, a Class A misdemeanor.

At the time of the arrest, Aguado was serving time in county jail for an Oct. 7 incident at Silver Lake Sportsman’s Club, Perry. 

In the Perry incident, he was accused of punching a man in the face, causing physical injury. 

He was jailed in the Wyoming County Jail on $2,500 cash bail.

His guilty plea Tuesday stems from two separate incidents, unrelated to the Sportsman’s Club arrest, while he was incarcerated.

On Jan. 18 he was charged with two counts of assault in the second degree for an altercation with a corrections officer (CO) in the jail.

According to a Wyoming County Sheriff’s report, Aguado assaulted a CO, subsequently dislocating the officer’s shoulder. The CO was treated at Wyoming County Community Hospital. 

In May, he allegedly once again got into an altercation with COs after being assigned to another cell block. 

During that incident, four of the officers involved suffered cuts, bruises and scrapes to their hands, arms and faces.

Aguado waived his right to appeal and is scheduled for sentencing May 15.

See related: County inmate accused of assaulting corrections officers, again

Tuesday, February 7, 2017 at 4:36 pm

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The following were in Wyoming County Court Jan. 31 before Judge Michael Mohun.

Tyler Jennings was in court for motions. His case was adjourned to Feb. 15 for an appearance and March 8 for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Chad Staley was in court for motions. His case was adjourned to Feb. 15 for an appearance and March 8 for a Huntley Hearing. 

The following were in county court Feb. 1 before Mohun.

Chivone Gheorghe was in court for a Huntley Hearing. The decision has been reserved and the case adjourned to March 2.

Heidi Hopkins, who is accused of a crime in Perry, pled not guilty to two counts of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree and two counts of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree, all are Class B felonies. Motions are scheduled March 30. Bail was set at $50,000 cash or $100,000 bond.

Roy Lawrence, who is accused of a crime in Perry, pled not guilty to two counts of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree and two counts of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree, all are Class B felonies. Motions are scheduled March 30. Bail was set at $25,000 cash and $50,000 bond.

The following were in county court Feb. 2 before Mohun.

Grayson Stock, who committed a crime in Arcade, pled guilty to criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree, a misdemeanor. He waived his right to appeal and is scheduled for sentencing April 27.

Jody Nelligan, who committed a crime in Arcade, was sentenced to five years probation and restitution of $26,075.55. She was convicted of attempted arson in the third degree.

Katrina Chandler, who is accused of a crime in Attica, pled not guilty to two counts of forgery in the second degree, both are Class D felonies, and two counts of petit larceny, a misdemeanor. The case is adjourned to April 27 for pre plea investigation.

Tammy Miller, who is accused of a crime in Attica, had her case adjourned to March 3 for trial.

John Townley, who committed a crime in Eagle, pled guilty to criminal mischief in the third degree, a Class E felony. He waived his right to appeal. The case was adjourned to April 27 for sentencing.

Jerod Trebian, who committed a crime in Silver Springs, had his case adjourned to Thursday for sentencing.

Ryan McDanel, who is accused of a crime in Warsaw, pled not guilty to two counts of attempted criminal possession of a weapon in the second degree, both as Class D felonies, and attempted criminal possession of a weapon in the third degree, a Class E felony. Motions are scheduled for March 30. Bail continues at $2,500.

Dekota Leiser is accused of a crime in Warsaw. Leiser's case is adjourned to Wednesday. 

Chastity Brace, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to a one-year conditional discharge and a five-year order of protection was issued. She pled guilty to criminal possession of a weapon in the fourth degree. Brace, who waived the right to appeal, was also arraigned on criminal possession of a weapon in the third degree, a Class D felony; unlawful imprisonment in the first degree, a Class E felony; and menacing in the second degree, a misdemeanor. Additionally, she admitted to a violation of probation which caused her probation to be revoked and she was resentenced to one year in prison with one year post-release supervision.

Julie Dutton, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to obstruct emergency medical services, a misdemeanor. She waived her right to appeal. She is scheduled for sentencing March 16.

Cory Goodenow, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to one-and-one-half years in prison and three years post-release supervision. An order of protection was issued, and he is responsible for court fees and surcharges. He was convicted of attempted rape in the second degree, a Class E felony.

Tracy Phillips, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to a three-year conditional discharge. She was convicted of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class D felony.

Eugene Matteson Sr., who is accused of a crime in Wyoming County, had his case adjourned to March 30.

The following were in county court before Mohun Feb. 6 and are from State Correctional Facilities in Attica.

Ronald Montgomery pled guilty to assault in the second degree, a Class D felony. He waived his right to appeal. Sentencing is scheduled April 12.

Billy Ray Staton was in court for motions. The case has been adjourned to March 2.

Jonathan Smith was in court for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant. The case has been adjourned to March 2.

Tuesday, February 7, 2017 at 4:08 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, accident, news, Cowlesville, Bennington.

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2007 Hyundai Accent – not actual vehicle in this case.

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2011 Hyundai Accent – not actual vehicle in this case.

Photos supplied by the New York State Police.

The New York State Police are investigating a hit and run collision that happened at approximately 11:50 a.m. Jan. 27 in Cowlesville.

Police say they are looking for a black Hyundai Accent between the model years of 2007 and 2011. 

According to reports, the vehicle was traveling eastbound when it went off the road striking a mailbox, then a red GMC Sierra pickup truck before coming to rest against a tree. 

The Hyundai fled the scene traveling eastbound, with extensive front-end damage.

Anyone with any information regarding this collision is asked to contact the New York State Police: (585) 344-6200.

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Scene of collision. 

Monday, February 6, 2017 at 5:40 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, announcements, government.

A comprehensive bill to bring ride-sharing to upstate New York communities has been approved by the Senate. The bill (S4159) provides the framework for ride-sharing companies to expand operations outside of New York City. It will also enable new jobs to be created by offering safe, reliable transportation options to upstate residents and visitors.

“It is simply unacceptable that ride-sharing companies such as Uber and Lyft are not available in Western New York and other upstate communities,” said Sen. Patrick M. Gallivan, (R-C-I, Elma).

“This legislation will create jobs and provide more transportation options for residents and visitors while generating funds to improve our roads and bridges. I urge the Assembly and the governor to act on this bill and end the unfair treatment of Upstate New York when it comes to ride-sharing services.” 

This Senate bill differs from the executive budget proposal by significantly cutting the taxes to be paid by ride-share customers to make it more attractive for businesses to operate here. While the budget includes a tax of 5.5 percent on rides that begin outside of New York City, the Senate’s measure cuts that tax to 2 percent. Additionally, it does not subject rides to the 4-percent state sales tax. That new revenue would go directly toward infrastructure improvements for roads, bridges, and county transit needs.

The measure includes important protections for both drivers and consumers as part of the regulatory framework authorizing Transportation Network companies (TNC) like Uber and Lyft to operate in Upstate communities. It requires criminal and driving history background checks, passenger notifications of driver information and trip charges, and the adoption of nondiscrimination and zero-tolerance drug and alcohol policies. 

The bill also creates a new TNC Accessibility Task Force to identify and address barriers to and opportunities for greater access for New Yorkers of all abilities. It also includes TNC drivers in workers’ compensation insurance offered through the existing Black Car Fund, among other provisions.

The bill will be sent to the Assembly.

Monday, February 6, 2017 at 5:22 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, environment, DEC, camps, Wildlife Federation.

The Wyoming County Wildlife Federation (WCWF) officers and delegates are offering four partial sponsorships for Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) “Camperships” in 2017. 

These camps are open to youth 11 to 17 years old. 

To be considered for one of the $200 WCWF sponsorships, the applicant must be a Wyoming County resident and demonstrate that they are registered for a DEC camp for the 2017 season. Additionally, a brief application must also be submitted to the WCWF. 

The registration period for the DEC camp is now open and information can be found here

The WCWF is also offering four full sponsorships to the 2017 Pat Arnold Memorial Trapping Camp. The registration period for this camp has not yet been established, WCWF officials say. 

To qualify for this sponsorship, applicants must be a Wyoming County resident and be registered for the trap camp. For more information, click here.

For more information about the sponsorships email the WCWF at krawczykbrian@gmail.com.

Monday, February 6, 2017 at 3:33 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Perry, Eagle, Attica, news.
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       Ryan McDanel

Ryan D. McDanel, 33, of Perry, was charged Feb. 4 with arson in the fourth degree, a Class E felony. In the early morning hours of Feb. 4, Perry Police and the Perry Fire Department responded to 45 Watrous St. for a report of a deck fire. Following an investigation, Perry Police say the deck was set on fire by McDanel. He was put in Wyoming County Jail on $10,000 cash bail or $50,000 bond. He is due in Perry Village Court at a later date.

Ivy J. Hnat, no age provided, of Perry, was charged Feb. 4 with petit larceny and criminal possession of a forged instrument in the third degree. Hnat is accused of signing and cashing a check that was not hers. She is due in Perry Village Court Feb. 14.

Ronald Dedominces, 51, of Lakeview, was charged Feb. 4 with snowmobiling while intoxicated and snowmobiling with a BAC over .08 percent, both as misdemeanors. Dedominces was stopped at a snowmobile crossing on Route 39, Eagle, for a registration check. During the check, he was allegedly found to have been drinking. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say he failed field sobriety testing and was arrested. His snowmobile was towed from the scene and the suspect was taken to the Sheriff’s Office. He is due in the Town of Eagle Court Feb. 27.

Kelly Plowe, 46, of Akron, was arrested Feb. 2 on a violation of probation warrant out of the Town of Attica Court. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say she was located following a tip from their “Warrant Wednesday” program on Facebook. She was put in Wyoming County Jail without bail.

Sunday, February 5, 2017 at 1:20 pm
posted by Howard Owens in Sports, wrestling.

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Class BB results:

 99  Justin Smith (MW) > Hunter Kurtz (CG) decision 4-3
106  Bradley Cheek (CG) > Muskon Monger (Warsaw) fall 1:09
113  Christopher Graham (CG) > J.J. Smith (WC) decision 8-1
120  Chad Toal (BB) > Andrew Englerth (LR) fall 5:57
126  Nicholas Young (Alexander) > Zach Flaitz (CG) decision 7-3
132  Dane Heberlein (Alexander) > Chase Runfola (Letchworth) decision 8-6
138  Mason Gray (Warsaw) > Kaul Runfola (Letchworth) fall 3:13
145  Andrew Norrison (MW) > Erik Balys (HK) decision 3-0
152  Mario Vazquez (ER) > Jeremy Browe (HK) decision 3-1
160  Noah Grover (Warsaw) > Zach Hamilton (Addison) fall 1:29
170  Matthew Gaiser (Alexander) > Braxton Leary-Hart (HK) technical fall 15-0
182  Will Thompson (BB) > Derrick Busch (Alexander) major decision 11-3
195  Chase Toal (BB) > Mark Sabins (WC) decision 8-4
220  Adam Walter (BB) > Jimmy Gross (AG) decision 3-2
285  Dominic Eriksen (NRW) > Brendan Marsocci (BB) default 2:18

Individual results for Class BBB not available.

We also received these results from Perry:

The Perry Varsity Wrestling team had a successful weekend at the sectional tournament.  They finished third as a team out of 16 teams. Eleven yellow jackets qualified for the super sectional tournament by placing in the top six at sectionals.  

 
1st Place
Cole Leitten 106
Jeff Uveino 195
Edwi Romo 220
 
3rd Place
Tyler Uveino 113
Brock Conaway 145
Mason Bush 152
Blake Wolfanger 160
 
5th Place
Austin Uveino 152
 
6th Place 
Gabe Bucknam 99
Tucker True 132
Jacob Francis 138
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Friday, February 3, 2017 at 3:40 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, drugs, children, health, Sen. Gallivan, news.

Press release:

The Senate has recently passed two bills to help save the lives of abused children who may otherwise slip through the cracks of Child Protective Services (CPS). The bills require testing young children for drugs if their guardian is arrested on drug charges, and they restrict high caseloads from jeopardizing the investigation of child abuse or maltreatment.

Bill S137 would require hair follicle testing of an infant or toddler under the age of 3 who is in the vicinity of parent or guardian who is arrested on a drug charge. 

The legislation, known as Kayleigh Mae's Law, is named after a 13-month-old child in Washington County who died in 2015 after being given heroin and cocaine for 10 months after birth. 

For children who are not yet old enough to speak, the hair follicle test would give a new tool for child protective investigations to help determine if a child’s health is at risk from illegal drug exposure.

“The goal of this legislation is to protect the lives of our most vulnerable citizens, our children,” said Sen. Patrick M. Gallivan (R-C-I, Elma). “We must also ensure that the caseworkers charged with the responsibility of keeping children and families safe are not overburdened and unable to perform their jobs effectively.” 

Bill S3146 establishes a statewide standard of no more than 15 cases per month per full-time child protective caseworker. The state Office of Children and Family Services recommends a CPS caseload size of 12 active reports per month. However, average caseloads are higher in many counties throughout the state. 

The bills have been sent to the Assembly.

Friday, February 3, 2017 at 3:33 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, travel, attractions, events, Warsaw.

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While Letchworth State Park is featured on its cover, the 2017 Wyoming County Travel Guide showcases several other features, events, and natural areas to explore throughout the county.

The Wyoming County Chamber & Tourism Department recently released the 2017 guide, which features John Kucko’s photo of the Middle and Upper Falls at the state park on the cover.

A total of 85,000 copies have been printed for use this year. They will be distributed to information centers and rest stops across New York, the northeastern United States and eastern Canada. 

The layout of the guide is similar to last year’s guide, with a detailed pull-out map of Letchworth State Park featuring hiking trails, overlook stops, and more. The travel guide is also linked to the Wyoming County Tourism website, which features an interactive and fully mobile platform, travel itineraries, events calendar, maps and business listings.

“We are extremely proud of the 2017 travel guide,” said Director of Tourism & Marketing Eric Szucs. “Every year we strive to create a comprehensive piece which will serve the visiting travelers, and the residents of the county alike. By showcasing Wyoming County’s diverse tourism businesses, attractions and events, we have an instrument to tell our story – and the moral of our story is Wyoming County is a premiere tourism destination for visitors throughout the world.”

Guides will also be available at local attractions, government offices, restaurants and shops, and can be picked up at the Chamber office located at the Wyoming County Ag and Business Center, 36 Center St. in Warsaw. Area residents who are welcoming visiting family and friends are encouraged to call or stop by the Chamber office to pick up a free guide. Area businesses who would like to have a supply of travel guides at their location are also encouraged to contact the Chamber at (585) 786-0307 or info@gowyomingcountyny.com.

“On behalf of the membership and Board of Directors, I would like to extend a special thanks to Eric Szucs for his hard work to deliver a great looking product for 2017,” said Chamber President Scott Gardner. “I would also like to thank all the businesses and advertisers in the guide, and the following who assisted their time and talent with the 2017 travel guide: The Warsaw Penny Saver, for the design of the guide; Julia Ferrini at the Wyoming County Free Press, for providing photographs to use throughout the guide; John Kucko Photography, for the cover photo; and Jerry Kelsey Photography.”

 The Wyoming County Chamber & Tourism is the leading membership organization for local and regional growth, advocacy, and connection for Wyoming County’s business community. 

Its mission is to serve the members and community; promote and grow the area’s economic and tourism assets; and work collaboratively to create an environment that leads to the success and economic prosperity of Wyoming County. 

The key programs and services of the organization are: educational seminars; leadership development; business assistance and guidance; cost-saving opportunities; advocacy; recognition; networking; exposure and promotional opportunities. For more information or to become a member call (585) 786-0307 or visit www.wycochamber.org

Friday, February 3, 2017 at 1:24 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, employment, jobs, Warsaw, news, announcements.

Several local agencies have teamed up to coordinate the 6th annual Wyoming County Job Fair. The Wyoming County Chamber & Tourism Office, Community Action for Wyoming County, Genesee Community College (GCC), the New York State Department of Labor, the Wyoming County YMCA, and Literacy West NY Inc. will be on hand from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. March 17 at GCC’s Warsaw campus, 115 Linwood Ave., Warsaw.

Employers wishing to participate are encouraged to contact the Chamber at (585) 786-0307 for more details and to secure a spot. Employer registration deadline is Feb. 17.

“This is a proven event and area businesses are encouraged to contact the Wyoming County Chamber to learn more about how to reserve a spot for this great recruitment opportunity,” said Chamber President Scott Gardner. “Whether you’re a seasonal employer, a growing manufacturer, a small business, or a dairy operation, now is the time to sign up to promote your business offerings and attract job seekers.”

The Job Fair is free and open to all those seeking employment opportunities. Interviews may take place on site and there will be assistance with resume writing and interview skills. 

“It’s recommended that job seekers treat the event as if they are going to an interview, said Employment and Training Division at Community Action Senior Coordinator Beth Caton. “We encourage everyone to bring their resume, be enthusiastic, ask questions, take notes, dress appropriately and thank the business representative for their time.”

There will be a wide variety of jobs available at all skill levels from very basic to technical. For more information go to www.wycochamber.org.

Friday, February 3, 2017 at 12:54 pm

Press release:

Sen. Patrick M. Gallivan (R-C-I, Elma) says $14 million is available to protect soil and water resources on farms across New York State through the Agricultural Nonpoint Source Abatement and Control Program. The grants will support efforts to address water quality challenges on farms in critical watersheds across the state.

"Agriculture is critical to New York’s economy and farmers are committed to protecting our environment and being good stewards of the land they use,” Gallivan said. “These funds will help prevent pollution, erosion and other environmental threats to our soil, water and air.”

The program is funded in the 2016-17 budget through the New York State Environmental Protection Fund. Gov. Andrew Cuomo proposes to continue the funding in this year’s executive budget at $300 million – the highest level in the program’s history.

County Soil and Water Conservation Districts can apply for the grant program on behalf of farmers through the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets website. Grants will be awarded to the districts to help farms with environmental planning; including the implementation of management systems, planting vegetation along streams to intercept runoff, and planting cover crops after the annual harvest to protect the soil.

The program is managed by the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets and the New York State Soil and Water Conservation Committee. It is a part of the Agricultural Environmental Management framework, a broader effort that helps farmers achieve better water quality and more efficient, cost-effective farming systems.

Friday, February 3, 2017 at 12:31 pm

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File photo.

The Arcade & Attica Railroad Corp recently received $1.3 million through the governor’s Passenger and Freight Rail Assistance Program. The funding will be used to rehabilitate a bridge and six miles of track to accommodate heavier rail cars.

“These investments not only support safe and reliable rail transportation, they also promote economic development and ensure growth in communities across the state,” said Sen. Patrick M. Gallivan, (R-C-I, Elma). 

New York awarded $25 million to 19 applicants through a competitive solicitation process. These investments will support track rehabilitation, capacity expansion, railroad bridge repairs, and economic development opportunities. 

Gallivan also says the Livonia, Avon & Lakeville Railroad Corp. in Livingston County received $1.1 million to rehabilitate yard tracks in Lakeville and Avon.

“I’m pleased that rail projects in Wyoming and Livingston counties are among those being funded.”

Additionally, $5.4 million in private and local funding is being leveraged through this state initiative. The funding will support projects that strengthen infrastructure and economic development throughout the state.

Friday, February 3, 2017 at 12:10 pm

Press release:

Congressman Chris Collins (NY-27) has sent correspondence to Department of Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly expressing a deep concern regarding the expedited implementation of the biometric exit-entry system.

"Western New Yorkers and our economy rely heavily on the timely movement between Canada and the United States via the Peace Bridge," Collins said. "While keeping our communities safe is my number one priority, I want to ensure that before any agency implements the biometric exit-entry system fully, we examine all possible transportation impacts and take steps to alleviate any disruptions that may be created. Our southern and northern borders have different security issues and I hope those differences are taken into account."

The biometric exit-entry program was requested by the 9/11 Commission to better track individuals traveling in and out of the country. However, its implementation has been delayed because of the significant logistical issues it could create. 

The issue has recently been raised because President Donald Trump in his executive order on immigration states: 

"The Secretary of Homeland Security shall expedite the completion and implementation of a biometric entry-exit tracking system for all travelers to the United States, as recommended by the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States."

In the letter, Collins writes, "I strongly support increased national security measures across our nation and commend President Trump for his swift action. However, I am concerned that an expedited implementation of this system will not take into consideration the differences in security interests at our northern and southern borders."

Furthermore, he urges Kelly "to carefully consider the widespread impacts implementation of a biometric entry-exit system would have on our northern border."

Collins previously introduced an amendment in 2015 requiring a pilot program be implemented before a full-scale implementation of the biometric exit-entry program to avoid any major commerce and travel disruptions.

Full text of the letter can be seen here.

Friday, February 3, 2017 at 11:58 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Warsaw, Arcade, Pike.

Patrick L. Gugliuzza, 37, of Warsaw, was charged recently following a Nov. 1 investigation into welfare fraud. The Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office and the Department of Social Services charged Gugliuzza with welfare fraud in the fourth degree and offering a false instrument for filing in the first degree, both are felonies. He is accused of failing to report that he both had a roommate and was collecting rent for approximately five months. Subsequently, he allegedly collected $1,350 in benefits that he was not entitled to. If found guilty, he could face a one-year disqualification from receiving public assistance benefits. A second offense carries a two-year disqualification and a third offense carries a lifetime ban.

Vincent A. Schaub, 20, of Arcade, was charged Jan. 31 with: underage possession of alcohol, unlawful possession of marijuana; speed not reasonable and prudent; failure to keep right; driving while ability impaired by a drug; and driving while ability by a combination of drugs and alcohol. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies stopped Schaub after seeing him “making an erratic turn onto Perry Road” then driving down the left lane of traffic. During the traffic stop, he was allegedly found to be in possession of marijuana and alcohol and subsequently arrested for DWI following roadside field sobriety testing. Schaub was taken to the Sheriff’s Office where he supplied a breath sample, which allegedly showed a small amount of alcohol still in his system. He was then put through a drug influence evaluation, after which officials determined him to be impaired by alcohol, cannabis, and a central nervous system depressant. He was deemed unable to operate a vehicle safely. He was put in Wyoming County Jail on $500 cash bail or $2,500 bond. He is due in the Town of Sheldon Court March 6.

Jared J. Acquard, 23, of Freedom, was charged Jan. 29 with unlawful possession of marijuana, inadequate headlamp, and driving while ability impaired by a drug. Deputies say Acquard was stopped on Main Street, Arcade, due to a nonworking headlight. During the investigation, it was allegedly found that the suspect was in possession of marijuana. He was subsequently arrested for DWAI following field sobriety testing. He was taken to the Arcade Police Department where he was given a drug influence evaluation. Following the evaluation, officials determined Acquard to be impaired by cannabis and unable to drive safely. He is due in the Village of Arcade Court Feb. 22.

Benjamin Minervino, 41, of Arcade, was charged Feb. 2 with speed unreasonable and prudent, driving while intoxicated, and operating a vehicle with a BAC of .08 percent or higher. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies responded to an accident with a vehicle on its side on Route 39, Pike. The investigation showed Minervino as the driver of the truck. Deputies also say they noticed he smelled of alcohol, and he allegedly subsequently tested positive for the beverage in his system. He was taken to the Sheriff’s Office, where he provided a breath sample that allegedly showed a BAC of .08 percent. He is due in Pike Town Court March 14.

Thursday, February 2, 2017 at 7:56 pm

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According to Jim Kelly, Varysburg Fire Department has a crew of “Type A” people – they can work together like a well-oiled machine and argue like brothers and sisters. 

And they were honored recently at the department’s annual Installation Dinner, held at Bryncliff Resort & Conference Center, Humphrey Road, Varysburg.

“They are compassionate, but not always to each other. They are old farts and whippersnappers. They train, they practice, they review, they volunteer, and are always ready to lend a helping hand. They cook, clean and get up at all hours of the night. They rush out of things they want to do, to rush out to help others,” Kelly said. “And sometimes, they hurt others feelings, but they don’t mean to. So from all of you to all of you… I’m sorry, we’re sorry.”

In December, the department held its annual Election of Officers meeting, to which:

    • Jim Kelly was appointed fire chief and treasurer;

    • Adam Vetter, 1st assistant chief;

    • Jeff Rogacki, 2nd assistant chief;

    • Thomas Belinger, captain and president;

    • Austin Skawienski, lieutenant;

    • Deb McCarty, rescue squad captain;

    • Sue Rogacki, rescue lieutenant and secretary;

    • Pat Almeter, fire police captain;

    • Bob Defedericis, vice president; and 

    • Marylou Knaggs, assistant treasurer.

One of Kelly’s first orders of business was to thank the outgoing chief for his knowledge.

“We need all of you to do what you do. I need you to help me do what we need to do. Adam (Vetter) required us to be at our best, safest, and most efficient. When we messed up, he let us know...he was making us better to be able to handle it the next time. It’s an awesome responsibility you (Vetter) have given me.”

According to Kelly, Vetter, the past fire chief, spent countless hours at the hall compiling information from each call. As he said “stats are important for improving ourselves.”

The total number of calls Varysburg volunteers responded to in 2016 was 174, up two from 2015. Of those calls, 119 were for emergency medical services (EMS) totaling 874.27 man hours (22 weeks –  just over five months – at 40-hours-per-week for one employee). Fire-related calls accounted for 55 of the 174 calls, totaling 732.16 man-hours (18 weeks – approximately four months – at 40-hours-per-week for one worker).

However, firefighters don’t just put in time for emergency services, they are also required to complete training, go to meetings, perform work details, and work fundraisers and the like. Members went to 383 different types of “non-incidents,” totaling 689.25 man-hours (17 weeks – approximately four months). Training consisted of 319 different sessions or classes, totaling 1,545.28 man-hours (39 weeks – just over 10 months).

The Varysburg department didn’t just respond to structure fires, fire calls also included a rope rescue, power lines problems, service and good intent calls, windstorm assessment, traffic control, and carbon monoxide alarms. EMS calls ranged from heart attacks, to overdoses, accidents, assistance calls, and more.

Not only was the entire department recognized for its commitment to the community, three people were recognized as “top responders for 2016:” 

    • Leonard  Knaggs – 114 calls;

    • Almeter – 110 calls; and 

    • Defedericis – 99 calls.

And others were recognized for their length of service:

    • One year -- Defedericis, AJ Dyrbala, Pam Hoag, and Maria Olague;

    • Five years -- John McCarty; and 

    • 20 years -- MaryLou Knaggs.

“We need all of you to do what you do,” Kelly said. “I need you to help me do what we need to do.”

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Wednesday, February 1, 2017 at 4:21 pm

RESTORE Sexual Assault Services, a program of Planned Parenthood of Central and Western New York, is recruiting volunteers for an upcoming training cycle in February and March. There is an urgent need for volunteers in Wyoming, Monroe, Genesee, Livingston, and Orleans counties.

“RESTORE covers five counties with 13 staff members,” said RESTORE Outreach and Education Specialist Lauren Berger. “As you can imagine, the needs of the community often outweighs the capacity to serve. The single biggest reason we can cover an area of this size and offer services 24 hours a day is because we have dedicated and committed volunteers.”

The role of Volunteer Advocates is responsible for fielding phone calls from their home and accompanying victims to the hospital or police station (transportation required). The time commitment is flexible, and at the volunteer’s discretion. All applicants will be screened and must complete 32 hours of training March 6 through March 16 prior to beginning their volunteer commitment.

“They are the hands and feet of RESTORE on the hotline and at the emergency room. They are the ambassadors of RESTORE’s mission to their families, friends and communities.”

Friend of RESTORE, a new volunteer role, is responsible for representing RESTORE at health and community fairs, tabling engagements and festivals; distributing materials to agencies in communities; and assisting with letters and media for awareness opportunities. All applicants will be screened and must complete six hours of training on Feb. 6.

Berger says volunteers take calls from their home counties, so those from Wyoming County would be responding to calls from this area. Additionally, the county services those who are victims of domestic violence, as well as sexual assault. Volunteers can also assist with awareness campaigns in the county, specifically Sexual Assault Awareness Month in April and Domestic Violence Awareness Month in October.

Those interested in volunteering for RESTORE must be at least 20 years old and be comfortable working with victims in a crisis situation.

“RESTORE offers a 24-hour hotline for anyone who has been impacted by sexual or domestic violence – for allies of survivors looking for ways to support their loved one; survivors looking to speak with a confidential non-judgmental source about something that may have happened decades before; or a survivor who is in need of immediate advocacy at a law enforcement or medical facility.”

RESTORE is able to respond to these facilities 24 hours a day, seven days a week, officials say. Volunteers aid the victim in knowing what their rights and options are, as well as to ensure the survivor has as much control over the process as possible.

Additionally, survivors can be accompanied to any medical or legal interaction, including school conduct hearings and court appointments. They offer counseling, assistance with resources and referrals, educational programs and assistance with compensation from the New York State Office of Victim Services when applicable.

For more information about volunteering with RESTORE, email volunteer@ppcwny.org.

RESTORE leads the community response to sexual violence through advocacy and education, by providing the safety, support and validation that changes the lives of all those affected. 

RESTORE 24-hour hotlines:

    • Wyoming, Livingston, Orleans, and Genesee counties: 1-800- 527-1757

    • Monroe County: (585) 546- 2777 

Planned Parenthood of Central and Western New York provides quality, nonjudgmental reproductive health care; promotes responsible and healthy sexuality, advocates for access to comprehensive health care, and supports those affected by sexual violence.

All of RESTORE’s services are free and confidential.

Wednesday, February 1, 2017 at 4:00 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, announcements, taxes, Sen. Gallivan, government.

Press release:

Sen. Patrick M. Gallivan (R-C-I, Elma) recently joined colleagues in the New York State Senate in passing legislation to make the property tax cap permanent. This would ensure the continuation of a measure that has already saved taxpayers more than $15.5 billion.  

The bill (S1207), sponsored by Senate Majority Leader John J. Flanagan (R-C-I, East Northport), would make the property tax cap permanent statewide, except in New York City where no cap is currently in place.

“The property tax cap has been very successful in putting an end to skyrocketing taxes in communities across the state,” Gallivan said. “New York property owners pay some of the highest taxes in the country and the only way to limit spending and get property taxes under control is to make the tax cap permanent.”

Growth in property taxes soared by more than 73 percent for New York school districts between 2001 and 2011, and 53 percent in counties. The property tax cap was first enacted in 2011 due to Senate Republican efforts to reduce New Yorkers’ tax burden. When the cap was created, it included a commitment to increase support to school districts and has resulted in a total of $4.9 billion – 26 percent – in school aid increases over the last five years.

The cap limits the annual growth of property taxes levied by local governments and school districts to 2 percent or the rate of inflation, whichever is less. By keeping within the cap, taxpayers statewide – except in New York City – have saved $15.5 billion over the last five years, and will save more than $66.4 billion cumulatively over the first 10 years of its implementation.

The bill has been sent to the Assembly.

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