Friday, May 5, 2017 at 11:11 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, education, announcements, letchworth.

Press release:

The Letchworth Central School District’s Board of Education (BOE) has named two finalists for the district’s next Superintendent. 

“The search attracted a number of qualified individuals from across the state. We are confident that one of these candidates will be the best to lead our district,” said Board of Education President Richard Wilcox. “The search process garnered a pool of highly qualified individuals.”

The two finalists are Matthew Wilkins and D. Todd Campbell. 

Wilkins is currently the principal of Letchworth High School, a position he’s held since 2006. During his time as principal, he has expanded agricultural and technical programs at the high school, added Advanced Placement courses, and collaborated with the administrative team to develop a master schedule. His responsibilities as principal also include assisting with the budget planning process to develop a balanced secondary and extracurricular annual budget. As the principal he oversees 45 staff and faculty and 280 students. 

Wilkins has spent his entire career – more than 20 years in education – at Letchworth Central schools. He began teaching in 1996 as a K-12 Physical Education teacher.

He holds a bachelor of science degree, as well as a master’s degree from The College at Brockport. Wilkins also earned his Certificate of Advanced Study in School Business Administration from Brockport. He holds New York State certifications in Physical Education, School Administrator, and Supervisor and School District Administrator.

D. Todd Campbell is the principal of Wayland Elementary School in the Wayland-Cohocton School District. Campbell has served in this role since 2003. During his tenure as principal, Wayland Elementary School has been recognized by New York state as a High Performing/Gap Closing School. Buffalo’s Business First Magazine has placed Wayland Elementary School on the Top 50 Elementary Schools in the state. 

As principal, Campbell is responsible for the education of 380 students and supervises 66 faculty and staff members. He creates and manages the instructional budget for the elementary school and also is responsible for all curriculum development and implementation at this school. 

From 2000 to 2003 he served as the principal of Perry Middle School where he facilitated the opening of a new middle school. This included the move of students and staff from two separate buildings and the creation of a new Middle School Program. Previously, he served as the Assistant Principal at Perry Elementary School. 

He began his career in education in 1991 as a teacher at Letchworth Central schools.

Campbell earned a bachelor of science from Houghton College, Houghton, and a master’s degree from The College at Brockport. He also holds a Certificate of Advanced Study in Educational Administration from Brockport.

Wilkins and Campbell will visit the district today for final interviews with stakeholder group representatives. Final interviews with the Board of Education will conclude each candidate’s visit. The anticipated start date for the new superintendent is July 3. 

The new superintendent will replace Julia Reed who is retiring at the end of the 2016-2017 school year. Kevin MacDonald, district superintendent of the Genesee Valley Educational Partnership, who is acting as search consultant, said the Board has developed and implemented a rigorous and transparent search process.

Friday, May 5, 2017 at 10:59 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, crime, State Police.

The New York State Police is warning the public of a recent increase of phone scams to elderly citizens. 

This scam includes a few different scenarios:
    • The caller claiming to be a family member in trouble or arrested in another State or Country. This caller will put urgency on helping them and not to contact other family.
    • The caller claims to be a law enforcement official with a family member under arrest demanding bail or funds for them. Police agencies do not contact family for bail money, officials say.

The caller in both scenarios will advise the victim to get a specific amount of money and buy gift cards from popular stores such as Walmart, Home Depot, Lowes, Target and other big retail stores. The victim is told to call a number and read off the gift card identification number.

Those gift cards are then used to buy items and are resold at a lesser amount by the suspect.

If you have parents or elderly people in your family, take the time to explain this scam to them.

Thursday, May 4, 2017 at 4:16 pm
posted by Billie Owens in Perry, ILGR, people with disabilities.

Press release:

Having long served the citizens with disabilities of Genesee, Wyoming and Orleans counties, Independent Living of the Genesee Region (ILGR) will now have an ongoing presence outside Batavia, in Wyoming County!

ILGR will be celebrating with an official Wyoming County Chamber of Commerce Ribbon Cutting at 12:30 p.m. Monday, May 22nd, followed by an Open House of the facility, at which refreshments will be served.

Our new office is located in the Community Action Building at 6470 Route 20A, just West of Coe Road in Perry, a few miles from the County Seat in Warsaw.  After the grand opening, our initial hours of operation will be from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday. (While the office will officially be closed on Fridays, individual meetings with staff are available with an advance appointment.) The phone number is (585) 969-4258.

Open House attendees will be able to meet our staff, including: Independent Living specialists, who can assist persons with disabilities with Social Security, housing, employment, and other areas to improve the quality of their lives; and a facilitated enroller with the Medicaid Application Assistance Program (MAAP).

They can also apply for positions of personal care attendant with our “Taking Control” Consumer-Directed Personal Assistance Services (CDPAS) program, which puts the individuals in charge of their own home care. At any time, consumers can sign up for our FREE classes in Diabetes Self-Management and Chronic Disease Self-Management.

For questions before the event, and to RSVP to ensure that we have enough refreshments, please call Donna Becker at (585) 815-8501, ext. 411.

Independent Living of the Genesee Region (ILGR) is a member of the Western New York Independent Living Inc. family of agencies that offers an expanding array of services to aid individuals with disabilities to take control of their own lives.

Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at 7:08 pm

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Members of Arcade, Cowlesville, Gainesville, Harris Corners, Pike, Silver Springs, and Strykersville fire departments, and Bennington Fire Company opened the doors to their departments Sunday as part of RecruitNY – a recruitment effort to draw members to the fire service.

Fire departments throughout Wyoming County are staffed entirely by volunteers. With an aging population, departments need the younger generation to join their local departments and officials say the need is across the board – firefighters, auxiliary and social members, and emergency medical responders.

In addition to recruitment efforts, members also used the time for training exercises.

For more information about joining the fire department visit http://www.wyomingco.net/emergency/main.html

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Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at 6:22 pm

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Members of Attica, Bliss, Castile, North Java, Perry, Sheldon, Varysburg, Warsaw, and Wyoming Hook & Ladder fire departments, and Perry Ambulance opened the doors to their departments Saturday as part of RecruitNY – a recruitment effort to draw members to the fire service.

Fire departments throughout Wyoming County are staffed entirely by volunteers. With an aging population, departments need the younger generation to join their local departments and officials say the need is across the board – firefighters, auxiliary and social members, and emergency medical responders.

For more information about joining the fire department visit http://www.wyomingco.net/emergency/main.html

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Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at 5:54 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Perry Fire Department, Perry.

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Not only did April showers bring May flowers, it also brought a throng of people to Perry Fire Department's first Spring Festival held Saturday at the Village Park.

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Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at 10:38 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, education, Warsaw, announcements.

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Students from Warsaw High School are giving back to their community. 

Kory Seewaldt, Isaac Stoddard, and James Ross, all seniors at Warsaw, were recognized recently for their efforts in designing and creating new hanging flower baskets for the village. 

The students are part of the BOCES metal trade program at the Mount Morris campus. Students from both the morning and afternoon sessions at the school were part of the project.

“The Village sent in the old baskets and the kids worked on how to make the baskets better, to last longer than the previous ones,” said Metal Trades instructor Olie Olson. 

According to Warsaw Town Supervisor Becky the hanging baskets the Village used – they had been bought two years ago – had deteriorated and new ones were needed. The Village received a grant, and part of the funding went toward the new baskets.

“The quality of the kids work is just outstanding. They are true craftsmen,” Ryan said.

The teens designed the product with round stock donated by Karl Drasgow, owner of Drasgow Inc., Gainesville, flat stock that was on hand at the school, and chain bought by the Village from Ace Hardware in Warsaw.

“Through their efforts, the baskets are going to last 30 years at least,” Ryan said.

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Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at 10:02 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Attica, Bennington.
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      Devon M. Ford

Devon M. Ford, 18, of Bennington, and a 17-year-old from Attica were both charged April 29 with burglary and criminal mischief following an incident in Perrysburg. The 17-year-old was also charged with unlawful possession of marijuana. 

Troopers responded to a 9-1-1 call of trespassers at the JN Adam Complex, Peck Hill Road, Saturday night. Responding troopers say they heard the teens inside the building breaking glass and damaging the building. The two boys allegedly fled the building, but were subsequently caught by the officers. 

The two were put in Cattaraugus County Jail in lieu of $1,000 cash bail or $2,000 bond.

Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at 9:39 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, crime, Attica, Sheldon.

The New York State Police conducted an underage drinking enforcement detail, in conjunction with the New York State Liquor Authority, April 28. 

Elizabeth Colkitt, 36, of South Wales, was charged with unlawfully dealing with a child in the first degree. 

She is accused of selling alcohol to a minor at the Flipside Bar, Sheldon.

She is due in the Town of Sheldon Court at 7 p.m. May 8.

Chad Winkelman, 24, of Attica, was also charged with unlawfully dealing with a child in the first degree.

Winkelman was arrested at Louie’s Lounge, Attica.

He is due in the Village of Attica Court at 10 a.m. May 8.

Monday, May 1, 2017 at 4:13 pm

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The students filed in noisily, as students do, into the bus garage. Once they were situated in their seats, the bus garage bay doors opened. The noisy students quieted at once. Before them three of their friends were involved in a car crash following a night of partying. One of their classmates was injured, one was taken away in handcuffs, and one was dead, her blood trailing down the passenger-side door, pooling onto the roadway.  

Teens in 11th and 12th grade at Letchworth High School were witness to the possible consequences of driving under the influence of alcohol or other drugs during a DWI crash simulation held at the school Friday afternoon.

Over the loudspeaker the students hear the call of the dispatcher. Within seconds, a siren went off. Within minutes, the first cop cruiser pulled into the parking lot, seconds later, the first ambulance.

“These are the same kids you hang with, play sports with, enjoy life with. In an instant they go from joy and laughter to pain and tears,” said Wyoming County Sheriff Gregory Rudolph. “Imagine you are a victim of this crash…this alcohol-related crash. You experience pain and anxiety caused by the metal and plastic bending and crushing around you as the vehicles collided. You are sitting in a pool of your own blood experiencing pain and suffering that no one should ever have to go through. You are sitting there helpless as you are waiting for help to arrive. Your fear turns to shock.”

As Rudolph was speaking, rescue personnel continued to arrive. The voices of the first responders are calm as they are assessing the situation. Medical responders are now on scene. A multitude of people are working feverishly to stabilize the driver who is still alive and sitting next to her now-dead friend. 

The driver in the other car is looked over for injuries and asked to step out of the vehicle, all the while the sounds of saws and extraction equipment break the seemingly chaotic scene. 

A white sheet is placed over the driver to protect her from the broken glass. Her passenger is covered with a white sheet and left alone as EMS focus their attention on the teen who is still alive.

Since the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) began recording alcohol-related statistics in 1982, the number of persons under 21 killed in drunk driving crashes decreased 80 percent. In 1982 there were 5,215 crashes. In 2015 there were 1,021. These fatalities account for 10 percent of the drunk driving fatalities in the United States. 

“When you are talking and you are looking at them (students) there isn’t horseplay going on, they aren’t talking, they are looking past you, paying attention to the scene. You can see it in their eyes that this could happen.”

The crash simulation is made possible by Partners 4 Prevention, School Resource Officer and Wyoming County Sheriff Deputy Ivan Carrasquillo, the NYS Troopers, the Silver Springs and Castile fire departments, Mercy Flight, the Wyoming County Coroner’s Office, District Attorney Donald O’Geen, and the Letchworth Central School SADD Club members and parent volunteers. 

The event, hosted by the Gainesville Fire Department, was intended to highlight the dangers of driving under the influence during the prom season. One third of all alcohol-related teen traffic deaths occur between April and June, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, with vehicle accidents ranking as the top cause of death for those between 12 and 19 years old. In fact, 1,000 young people die annually during prom and graduations celebrations, according to the National Traffic Administration.

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Monday, May 1, 2017 at 2:18 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, weather.

The National Weather Service in Buffalo has issued a tornado watch in effect until 10 p.m. for all of Western New York and surrounding counties.

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Monday, May 1, 2017 at 11:56 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, weather.

Strong to severe thunderstorms are possible later this afternoon and evening, say officials at the National Weather Service in Buffalo. 

While there will be some showers and possible thunderstorms over the region into the midday hours, later today a cold front is expected to push across the state. This front will generate a second round of storms that could reach severe limits. 

Officials say the severe weather potential will be greatest between 5 and 8 p.m.. Along with the risk for widespread severe weather, there will be heightened concern for flooding due to slow moving downpours and very wet existing conditions.

Sunday, April 30, 2017 at 10:38 pm
posted by Howard Owens in fire, castille, news.

A barn fire, with flames show, is reported at the corner of Middle Reservation Road and Kennedy Road, Castile.

Castile fire dispatch and a second alarm has been called.

UPDATE 10:41 p.m.: Chief on scene says, "I believe it's just a digester."

UPDATE 10:44 p.m.: Confirmed, it's a digester. All responding units can stand down.

Saturday, April 29, 2017 at 10:05 pm
posted by Howard Owens in fire, Warsaw, news.

A structure fire is reported on a farm at 4085 Quakertown Road, Warsaw.

Warsaw fire responding.

Gainsville, Varysburg and Silver Springs dispatched to staging area for second alarm.

UPDATE 10:06 p.m.: Correction from dispatch, not a structure fire, but an out-of-control brush fire.

UPDATE 10:12 p.m.: Trucks already on the road can continue, all others to remain in their halls. A chief reports, "a pretty large fire." Chief on scene confirms it's a brush fire.

Friday, April 28, 2017 at 7:03 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, accident, news, Perry.

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Around 4 p.m. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies responded to an accident at Route 20A and Silver Lake Road where a red pickup truck slammed into a utility pole, severing the top portion of the pole from its base. Before the truck could be removed from the scene crews from NYSEG had to cut the power to the electric lines.

One person was taken to Strong Memorial Hospital via Mercy Flight; a passenger in the vehicle was checked by medical personnel, signed off on treatment and was released.

Assisting at the scene were Perry Center and Perry fire departments, Perry Ambulance, Perry Police, and Ott’s Towing. 

The cause of the accident is under investigation.

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Friday, April 28, 2017 at 6:15 pm

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun April 27.

Thomas McCabe III, who is accused of a crime in Bennington, pled not guilty to criminal possession of a controlled substance in the second degree, a Class A-II felony. Motions are scheduled June 22. Bail was set at $100,000 cash, bond or property.

Leah McCabe, who is accused of a crime in Bennington, pled not guilty to criminal possession of a controlled substance in the second degree, a Class A-II felony. Motions are scheduled June 22. Bail was set at $25,000 cash or $50,000 bond.

Lorenzo Eaton, who committed a crime in Arcade, was sentenced to five years probation on the conviction of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony. Restitution of $200 has also been paid.

Katrina Chandler, who committed a crime in Attica, pled guilty to forgery in the second degree, a Class D felony, and petit larceny. She was sentenced to one year interim probation. Restitution of $600 has been paid.

Serena Silvernail waived indictment on forgery in the second degree, a Class D felony, and grand larceny in the fourth degree, a Class E felony. Silvernail pled guilty to the lesser charge of petit larceny. She was sentenced at the discretion of the Court to a one-year conditional discharge. Restitution of $1,700 has been paid. An order of protection was issued.

Michael Marrale, who committed a crime in Attica, pled guilty to reckless endangerment in the first degree, a Class D felony, and driving while intoxicated, a Class E felony. An order of protection was issued and the case was adjourned to July 20 for sentencing.

Grayson Stock, who committed a crime in Attica, was sentenced to three years probation, a $1,000 fine, $20 in restitution, and 75 hours in community service. He was convicted of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree, a Class A misdemeanor.

John Townley, who committed a crime in Eagle, was sentenced to one year interim probation on the conviction of criminal mischief in the third degree, a Class E felony.

Clifford Murch, who is accused of a crime in Perry, had his case adjourned to Monday.

Sarah Ingalls, who is accused of a crime in Perry, had her case adjourned for Treatment Court. Formerly called Drug Court, Treatment Court not only handles those who have a drug problem, but also those with an alcohol or mental health problem. Other assistance involves aiding with health insurance issues – oftentimes a hurdle to gaining access to treatment – for outpatient or inpatient services.

Carl Vander, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to six months in jail, five years probation, $147.31 in restitution, and fees and surcharges. He was convicted of attempted assault in the second degree and attempted burglary in the third degree, both are Class E felonies. 

Chad Main, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to driving while intoxicated, a Class E felony. Sentencing is scheduled July 20.

Tyler Tones, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to failure to register as a sex offender, a Class E felony. Sentencing is scheduled June 22. He is held in Wyoming County Jail without bail.

Ryan McDanel, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to attempted criminal possession of a weapon in the third degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled July 20.

Jeffrey Snyder II, who committed a crime in Wethersfield, pled guilty to assault in the second degree, a Class D felony. He was sentenced to one year interim probation. An order of protection was left in place. Final sentencing is April 12.

Alex Drake, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, admitted to a violation of probation. Sentencing is scheduled June 22. He is held without bail in Wyoming County Jail.

Brandon McCoy, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, admitted to a violation of probation and was released back to probation. Final sentencing is Aug. 3.

The following are from State Correctional Facilities in Attica and were in Court before Mohun April 26 and 27. 

Jerry Gillard pled guilty to attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled May 17.

Jamal Wilson pled guilty to attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled June 21. Wilson waived appearance at sentencing.

James Smith had his case adjourned to May 3. He continues to be held without bail.

Billyray Staton pled guilty to attempted criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled June 21.

Jonathan Smith pled guilty to attempted criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled June 21.

Andrew Mott had his case adjourned to May 17.

Lindell Cox had his case adjourned to June 21 for an appearance. He is scheduled for trial July 7.

Benedict Agnostini had his case adjourned to June 21.

Patrick Hill was in court for a Huntley Hearing. The decision has been reserved. The case has been adjourned to May 17.  A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant. After the hearing of a trial or the argument of a motion a judge might not immediately deliver a decision, but instead take time to review evidence and the law and deliver a decision at a later time, usually in a written form, thus reserve decision.

Thursday, April 27, 2017 at 10:25 pm
posted by Howard Owens in fire, Pike, news.

A fully involved car fire is reported in the area of 6942 Route 19, Pike.

Traffic is being stopped on the road while Pike fire responds.

Thursday, April 27, 2017 at 1:39 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Business, Warsaw, ice cream.

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Yummies wasn’t the first choice of business names for ice cream shop owner Valerie Hoffman, Creekside Treats was. However, after one of her first customers turned to her young daughter and said “Oh, this is so yummy,” Hoffman thought to herself “This is good.”

That was 10 years ago.

On Saturday, Yummies, 12 Center St., Warsaw, is hosting a celebration to mark its decade in business and its 11th season.

“My 8-year-old daughter at the time, picked out the name Yummies,” Hoffman said. “There were a couple of different names I was thinking about, but Yummies won.”

About a dozen years ago, the only ice cream shop in Warsaw closed down. Ten years ago she was working at Genesee Community College with the Upward Bound program and every day she would pass by the empty building on her way to work.

“When Wayne’s World (where Tim Hortons is now) closed, I kept thinking that the building would make a great ice cream shop. So I decided Warsaw needed an ice cream shop. Things started falling into place of what I thought God wanted me to do. So I bought the building.”

Prior to Yummies opening, the building was Shears Restaurant – back in the ’70s and ‘80s – a coffee shop, a taco place, and a health food shop.

“People come in and tell me they remember when it was Shears,” she said. “It looks very different from what it did then though. 

“I was very scared about the initial investment. When I first thought about opening an ice cream shop I thought ‘How hard can it be?’… The best advice I can give…work in that business first. I would not have made it through my first year if not for the two girls who started working for me then. Between the two, they had more than nine years experience in the ice cream business.”

To help celebrate Hoffman’s business milestone, three of Yummies original employees – Robin L’Wall, Hanna Ross, and Holden Case – will be scoopin’ ice cream from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday.

Serving ice cream is a physically demanding job and does require thought, Hoffman says. Not only are employees “stoopin’ and scoopin’ for an entire shift,” and rotating stock – each 2-gallon container of ice cream weights approximately 10 pounds – there are certain tricks to the trade to give customers a proper order as well.

“There is a system for everything.”

From the rotation of the stock to the refrigeration of sorbet – it requires a different temperature than ice cream to keep cold – to carrying flavors and toppings the customers like.

“I have to carry what everyone likes,” Hoffman laughed. “Not just what I like. And I’m mindful about freshness.”

To learn more about owning her own business, Hoffman took an entrepreneurship course through the county. To learn more about ice cream, she became a member of the National Ice Cream Association. She even traveled to Cleveland to learn how to create her own custom flavors. While some of her flavors are originals – Muddy Frog ice cream is a concoction from the minds of her employees – the Cookie Monster variety came from Connecticut – with a slight tweak of her own.

“I turned it blue.”

Hoffman didn’t start making her own Yummies creations until about three years ago. 

“I found that people like stuff in their ice cream, so when I make everything, the added ‘stuff’ has to be hand stirred in. I get the ideas (for flavors) from anything.”

And her energy and imagination are boundless. 

For April Fools' Day, Yummies has served up flavors like wasabi, wingin’ it, and pickle-flavored ice cream to her customers. To wit, the pickle variety inspired the children’s book “Yummies Ice Cream Surprise” by author Valerie Putney and illustrator Stephanie Russell, both of whom will be on hand at the shop from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday.

“The ice cream was good…until you got to the pickle pieces or chicken in it, then it was a bit funky. We gave away samples to people. It was just for fun, not to sell.”

Not only does she make her own flavors, she also makes the waffle cones every day and had developed a flavor just for her vegan customers.

“Vegan ice cream has zero animal product in it. Customers wanted something creamy, but vegan. It took me a few tries to get it right, but…It’s made with coconut milk, Oreos, and peanut butter. I had to be conscientious that no animal products are used.”

Patrons of Yummies are not only greeted by the 15 employees that cover the various shifts throughout the day, they follow an ice cream path, of sorts, to the patio and are then “greeted” by Yum E. Bear – a 3-foot metal sculpture situated near the side entrance. Students in Warsaw’s technology class at the BOCES in Mt. Morris made ice cream patterned stamps for the shop. When the concrete was poured, the stamps were used to create the imprints in the freshly poured walkway.

“When I was at a United Way fundraiser three years ago, I bought the bear. I have him secured to the patio as a detour for a tripping hazard.”

Although she says the bear may appear scary to her younger patrons, she likes to dress him up to make him a bit more friendly. But Yum E. Bear has not exactly diminished her business. Last Sunday alone the shop went through approximately 60 gallons of ice cream, not including soft serve, sorbet or the vegan variety, and approximately 1,500 customers were served.

“I like to have fun. I’m very social. I like to talk to people. I like interacting with my employees. We even have a custom-made corn hole game for our customers to play.”

Hoffman is community minded outside of her business as well. At the end of the season she donates the remaining ice cream to the Warsaw Fire Department. Firemen take over the shop for a day and scoop for donations.

“You can’t keep ice cream. Ten years ago, my brother-in-law, who was chief at the time, had the idea and we made it happen. We’ve been doing it ever since and try to make it a fun day for the kids.”

And, it just so happens to coincide with Fire Safety Week at the school.

While Hoffman enjoys the challenges and rewards with owning her own business, she does wish there were two of her.

“There’s just so many things I’d like to do. I would like to open another location, but I feel I need to be present…and you can’t be present in two locations.”

But for now, Hoffman is satisfied with scoopin’ and selling Yummies T-shirts.

“If I were to own any business, this would be the one I’d own.”

Yummies is open seven-days-a-week – from noon to 9 p.m. in the dining area and until 9:30 at the drive-thru – through the Friday after Columbus Day (October).

For more information visit http://www.yummiesicecream.com/ or call (585) 786-0430.

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Thursday, April 27, 2017 at 10:17 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Gainesville, Perry, Bliss, Eagle.
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      Ervin Delude Sr.

Ervin Delude Sr., 45, of Gainesville, was charged April 24 with criminal contempt in the first degree and aggravated family offense, both are felonies, and resisting arrest and disorderly conduct. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies responded to a Dutton Road address in the Town of Gainesville for a domestic dispute. Deputies say they were told Delude fled the scene on foot. A short time later, officers allegedly found the man walking north on nearby railroad tracks. After speaking with Delude for several minutes, he attempted to run and a foot pursuit ensued. Delude was captured and arrested on the above charges. He was put in Wyoming County Jail without bail due to numerous previous felony convictions. He is due in court at a later date.

Kevin Massey, 23, and Justin Kelly, 18, both of Bliss, were charged April 23 with criminal mischief in the fourth degree. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies responded to Route 39 in the Town of Eagle following a complaint about someone’s truck windows being shot out. After speaking with both men, officers say they admitted to shooting the windows with a BB gun. Both Massey and Kelly live next door to where the windows were shot out from. Both are due in court at a later date.

Dzemail Odzakovic, 19 of Rochester, was charged April 23 with driving while ability impaired – drugs, unlawful possession of marijuana, and other traffic tickets. Odzakovic was stopped on Route 20A, Perry Center, for allegedly speeding. During the investigation, deputies say an odor of marijuana was coming from within the car and also noticed other indicators about the driver to suggest he may have been smoking marijuana. After allegedly failing roadside field sobriety testing, Odzakovic was taken to the Sheriff’s Office. He was then evaluated by a drug recognition expert, who allegedly determined him to be under the influence of cannabis. He is due in Perry Court at a later date.

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 John M. Dumbleton

John M. Dumbleton, 28, of Gainesville, was charged April 25 with failure to stop at a stop sign and driving while ability impaired by drugs. Perry Police say Dumbleton failed to stop at the stop sign at the five corners (Lake and Leicester streets), prompting a traffic stop. During the investigation, it was suspected that he was under the influence of drugs. Following a failed roadside sobriety test, he was then evaluated by a drug recognition expert (DRE). The DRE allegedly determined Dumbleton to be under the influence of depressants and that he could not operate a vehicle safely. He is due in Perry Village Court June 20.

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