Arcade

Sunday, February 26, 2017 at 1:07 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, fire, Arcade.

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Although the house has since been razed, money was the prime mover for the March 2015 back-to-back fires on Liberty Street in the Village of Arcade.

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     Jody Nelligan

“She lied about the fire under oath when she was actually deposed,” said Wyoming County Assistant District Attorney Vincent Hemming in court transcripts. “This was someone that started a fire in a house, with children in that house, for money.” According to court transcripts dated Feb. 2, Jody Nelligan, 40 of Orchard Park, admitted to the Wyoming County Probation Department of intentionally setting fire to the home to “get the renter’s insurance policy.” Additionally, up until her guilty plea Oct. 27, Nelligan “continuously lied about this fire for a substantial period of time.”

Hemming also noted that Nelligan has no drug or alcohol issue “whatsoever,” but did ask the Court to consider incarceration as part of any probationary sentence.

The matter was seen before Wyoming County Judge Michael Mohun.

On March 23, 2015 a fire broke out in the basement of a Liberty Street home in Arcade. Arcade, Strykersville, Yorkshire, Chaffee-Sardinia, and Harris Corners fire departments were on the scene for three hours, under the direction of Fire Chief in Charge, Arcade Fire Chief Tom Beirsdorf putting out the fire. Standing by at empty stations were Bliss and Sheldon fire departments.

The following day, several surrounding fire companies responded to the home for a second time for a fire that began in a second-floor bedroom closet. Following the fires, Nelligan, another adult, and four children were being assisted by the Red Cross and family members. The four family cats were also saved. 

Arcade, Yorkshire, Harris Corners, Bliss, Strykersville, Chaffee-Sardinia, and Sheldon fire companies were on the scene for five hours battling the blaze. They were assisted at the scene by Wyoming County Emergency Services, Wyoming County Sheriff’s Department, Arcade Electric, and the Arcade Police Department. Standing by at empty stations were Bliss and Holland fire departments.

On July 1 of last year, Nelligan was charged with setting both fires – two counts of arson in the second degree, a Class B felony; and two counts of perjury in the first degree, a Class D felony.

In October she had pled guilty and on Feb. 2 she was sentenced.

At the time of her sentencing, Nelligan was facing up to six months in jail and five years probation.

Nelligan’s attorney, Andrew Pace, reiterated to the Court that she has taken full responsibility for the fires. He also quotes a probation officer as saying she is “extremely apologetic, very distraught with what happened, and since we left court at our last appearance, she has taken steps to help remediate what can only be described as a myriad of mental health issues.”

Additionally, she has no criminal record and is working with a mental health counselor weekly, a psychotherapist monthly, and her primary care physician to coordinate all of her medications.

Pace stressed to the Court in his memoranda how “essential it was that we try and get Jody back to her family,” because she is the primary caregiver of not only her four children, but her sickly father and her husband as well.

When Mohun gave Nelligan an opportunity to speak, she again apologized for the fires and told the Court it would not happen “ever again.”

“I am a mom and I have four children,” Nelligan said. “Two of my children are special need children and they need my care daily and I have my father, who I’m a caregiver for. He’s 70 years old and I would really hope that you would impose probation on me and not jail time because I need to be home with my family.”

Mohun then asked the defendant if the family she spoke of was the same family that was in the house when she set fire to it. To which she had said her father was not present at the time of the fires, but her children were.

“And now you’re asking not to put you in jail because you want to be a mother to these children that you put at risk?” Mohun questioned.

Nelligan admitted that it was a “bad choice,” to which Mohun said it was “probably a most horrific choice that anyone could make, let alone a mother.”

Due to the fact that she is working with a counselor and receiving medication for her illness, this gave the judge pause. Mohun noted that if there was no constraint on sentencing, a state prison sentence may have been appropriate.

“You put the lives of your children at risk,” Mohun said. “For what? For money. It’s an extraordinary tale that is told in this prosecution where you put money ahead of your children’s safety. You put them at risk. That is certainly not a motherly instinct.”

With that said, however, Mohun agreed with Pace that she has taken steps to “come clean” and did not think her children should “suffer any more for your criminal behavior.”

“Every day you are with those children is a blessing, and I hope you don’t put them at risk anymore because this is a revocable sentence,” Mohun said.

According to New York Penal Law 60.01 a revocable sentence  shall be deemed a tentative one to the extent that it may be altered or revoked in accordance with the provisions of the article under which it was imposed, but for all other purposes shall be deemed to be a final judgment of conviction.  

Nelligan was convicted of attempted arson in the third degree and sentenced to five years probation, $26,075.55 in restitution, and fees and surcharges.

See related: Unknown cause sparked the first fire at a Liberty Street home in ArcadeArsonist responsible for setting two fires at a Liberty Street home, ArcadeAn Orchard Park woman pled guilty to setting fire to an Arcade home last year

Thursday, February 23, 2017 at 9:03 am

The State University of New York (SUNY) at Geneseo has announced its president's list for the fall semester 2016. To be on the list, a student must have achieved an A in all coursework (4.0 grade point average) while taking at least 12 credit hours.

The following students were named to the list:

    • Dillon Ramsey from Arcade;

    • Jayden Wolcott from Silver Springs; and

    • Nicole Forti and Thomas Forti, both of Wyoming.

SUNY Geneseo is a public liberal arts college dedicated to developing socially responsible citizens with skills and values for a productive life.

Wednesday, February 22, 2017 at 2:47 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, Business, Warsaw, Attica, Arcade, Perry, Main Street.

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New York adopted the "click-through nexus" law in 2008. It requires certain out-of-state or online merchants to collect tax on sales of their own merchandise. That first-in-the-nation law is the template for statutes in nearly two dozen other states and survived court challenges, including the New York State Court of Appeals.

Within Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s executive budget is a proposal seeking to require “marketplace providers” to collect New York’s state and local sales taxes on merchandise shipped into the state from out-of-state sellers. This proposal applies the existing nexus law to a new and growing Internet sales platform.

“Online retailers put brick-and-mortar businesses on our Main streets at a competitive disadvantage,” said Wyoming County Chamber President Scott Gardner. “They (online retailers) may not be collecting the sales tax on merchandise, whereas a local merchant has to because they are located in New York.”

If the online business does not have a physical presence in the state, it can be more difficult for the state to enforce the collection of the sales tax from purchases made by New York consumers.

“It hurts people like our independent booksellers, small retailers, gift shops, clothing stores, etcetera,” Gardner said.

The budget proposal would require online marketplaces with more than $100 million in annual sales to collect and remit tax just as consignment shop owners and auction houses now do. Estimates show that improved enforcement of existing tax laws would result in some $275 million in fiscal year 2018-19.

Wyoming County Board of Supervisors Chairman Doug Berwanger was unavailable for comment.

Thursday, February 16, 2017 at 4:36 pm

Press release:

Sen. Patrick M. Gallivan, (R-C-I, Elma) says $3 million in state funding will help eligible municipalities and rural electricity cooperatives purchase electric vehicles for their municipal use fleets. The program is part of the New York Power Authority’s Municipal Electric-Drive Vehicle Program, which provides financial assistance to facilitate the replacement of less fuel-efficient vehicles.

“This funding will help towns and villages purchase electric and hybrid vehicles that are more fuel efficient and promote a cleaner environment,” Gallivan said. “The state’s financial support allows municipalities to participate in this important initiative and makes the program affordable to more communities.”

In Senate District 59, the villages of Arcade, Castile, Churchville, Silver Springs, and Springville are eligible to participate in the Municipal Electric-Drive Vehicle Program.
Several types of electric and hybrid vehicles are offered for purchase under the program, including passenger cars, pickup trucks, off-road specialty vehicles and heavy-duty utility bucket trucks. 

Municipalities and rural electric cooperatives that currently receive low-cost hydropower from the New York Power Authority are eligible to participate in this program. The funding builds on $5 million previously distributed under this program that has helped put 61 clean vehicles into service in 24 towns and villages across the state.

New York Power Authority's Municipal Electric-Drive Vehicle program works by providing zero-interest financing. The funds made available for the purchase of these vehicles are recovered over the course of three years.

New York Power Authority serves 47 municipal and four rural electric cooperative utility systems around the state, providing them with low-cost hydropower to help meet the electricity needs of their residents and businesses.

Monday, February 13, 2017 at 7:33 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Arcade Winterfest, Arcade, snow.

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Thursday, February 9, 2017 at 3:57 pm

The State University of New York (SUNY) at Geneseo has announced its dean's list for the fall 2016 semester. To be on the list, a student must have achieved at least a 3.5 grade point average while taking a minimum of 12 credit hours.

Students named to the dean’s list include:

    • Maura Cupicha, of Wyoming;

    • Elijah Buck, of Warsaw;

    • Jamie Irwin, of Perry;

    • Samantha Pawlicki, of North Java;

    • Spencer Head and Kassandra Johnston, both of Attica; and

    • Ryan Madden, of Arcade.

Tuesday, February 7, 2017 at 4:36 pm

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The following were in Wyoming County Court Jan. 31 before Judge Michael Mohun.

Tyler Jennings was in court for motions. His case was adjourned to Feb. 15 for an appearance and March 8 for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Chad Staley was in court for motions. His case was adjourned to Feb. 15 for an appearance and March 8 for a Huntley Hearing. 

The following were in county court Feb. 1 before Mohun.

Chivone Gheorghe was in court for a Huntley Hearing. The decision has been reserved and the case adjourned to March 2.

Heidi Hopkins, who is accused of a crime in Perry, pled not guilty to two counts of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree and two counts of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree, all are Class B felonies. Motions are scheduled March 30. Bail was set at $50,000 cash or $100,000 bond.

Roy Lawrence, who is accused of a crime in Perry, pled not guilty to two counts of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree and two counts of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree, all are Class B felonies. Motions are scheduled March 30. Bail was set at $25,000 cash and $50,000 bond.

The following were in county court Feb. 2 before Mohun.

Grayson Stock, who committed a crime in Arcade, pled guilty to criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree, a misdemeanor. He waived his right to appeal and is scheduled for sentencing April 27.

Jody Nelligan, who committed a crime in Arcade, was sentenced to five years probation and restitution of $26,075.55. She was convicted of attempted arson in the third degree.

Katrina Chandler, who is accused of a crime in Attica, pled not guilty to two counts of forgery in the second degree, both are Class D felonies, and two counts of petit larceny, a misdemeanor. The case is adjourned to April 27 for pre plea investigation.

Tammy Miller, who is accused of a crime in Attica, had her case adjourned to March 3 for trial.

John Townley, who committed a crime in Eagle, pled guilty to criminal mischief in the third degree, a Class E felony. He waived his right to appeal. The case was adjourned to April 27 for sentencing.

Jerod Trebian, who committed a crime in Silver Springs, had his case adjourned to Thursday for sentencing.

Ryan McDanel, who is accused of a crime in Warsaw, pled not guilty to two counts of attempted criminal possession of a weapon in the second degree, both as Class D felonies, and attempted criminal possession of a weapon in the third degree, a Class E felony. Motions are scheduled for March 30. Bail continues at $2,500.

Dekota Leiser is accused of a crime in Warsaw. Leiser's case is adjourned to Wednesday. 

Chastity Brace, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to a one-year conditional discharge and a five-year order of protection was issued. She pled guilty to criminal possession of a weapon in the fourth degree. Brace, who waived the right to appeal, was also arraigned on criminal possession of a weapon in the third degree, a Class D felony; unlawful imprisonment in the first degree, a Class E felony; and menacing in the second degree, a misdemeanor. Additionally, she admitted to a violation of probation which caused her probation to be revoked and she was resentenced to one year in prison with one year post-release supervision.

Julie Dutton, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to obstruct emergency medical services, a misdemeanor. She waived her right to appeal. She is scheduled for sentencing March 16.

Cory Goodenow, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to one-and-one-half years in prison and three years post-release supervision. An order of protection was issued, and he is responsible for court fees and surcharges. He was convicted of attempted rape in the second degree, a Class E felony.

Tracy Phillips, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to a three-year conditional discharge. She was convicted of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class D felony.

Eugene Matteson Sr., who is accused of a crime in Wyoming County, had his case adjourned to March 30.

The following were in county court before Mohun Feb. 6 and are from State Correctional Facilities in Attica.

Ronald Montgomery pled guilty to assault in the second degree, a Class D felony. He waived his right to appeal. Sentencing is scheduled April 12.

Billy Ray Staton was in court for motions. The case has been adjourned to March 2.

Jonathan Smith was in court for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant. The case has been adjourned to March 2.

Friday, February 3, 2017 at 2:01 pm

Genesee Community College (GCC), including all seven campus locations in Warsaw, Arcade, Batavia, Albion, Dansville, Lima, and Medina, recently announced the dean’s list, provost’s list, and president’s list for the fall 2016 semester.

Dean's list honorees include:

    • Summer Beitz, Alicia Dylag, and Joelle Reiner, all of Attica;

    • Quinn Konfederath and Candace Bliss, both of Bliss;

    • Briona Terray, of Cowlesville;

    • Alyssa Witkowski, of Java Center;

    • Caitlin Pietron, of Pike;

    • Megan Gerde and Angela George, both of Strykersville;

    • Leanna Smith, Bethany Messe, Ciera Rinehart, Alicia Rast, Marissa Allard, and Caleb Miller, all of Perry;

    • Ashley Davis, of Portageville;

    • Heather Herrmann, of Silver Springs;

    • Shelagh Neeley, Makayla Irwin, Samantha Flint, Michael Cedrone, Manoj Rai, Allison Robb, and Sondra Lucas, all of Warsaw;

    • Kali Wright, Samantha Parsons, and Kaeleigh Bean, all of Wyoming;

    • Kaitlin Erb, Dylan Smoot, William Plume, Craig Fitzgerald, Amanda Fuller, and Tyler Marble, all of Arcade; and

    • Kory Debeau, of North Java.

Students named to the dean's list have earned a quality point index of 3.50 to 3.74.

Provost's list honorees include:

    • Abigail Skillman, of Arcade;

    • Casey Callahan, Nathaniel Washington, Shirl Clark, Marilyn-Lacy Leto, Lisa Deahn, and Julie Slepinski, all of Attica;

    • Stephanie Kehr, of Java Center;

    • Julia Chojnacki and Rachel Werner, of Varysburg;

    • Andrea Harter, Andrea Prince, and Hillary Shaffer, all of Perry;

    • Kristen Stephany, Zachary Brewer, Ashley Carney, and Delores Cedrone, all of Warsaw; and

    • Christopher Herrmann, of Wyoming.

Students named to the provost's list have maintained part-time enrollment and earned a quality point index of 3.75.

President's list honorees include:

    • Zachary Harrigan, Steven Boje, Katie Simar, Andrew Hyman, Zachary Wiedemann, Courtney Westberg, Ashley Miller, and Meghan Potter, all of Arcade;

    • Brittany Anderson, Nicholas Shadbolt, Gina Glor, Sydney Breton, Ryan Napieralski, John Burek, Rachel Beck, Courtney Schaller, Savannah Bartosik, Matthew Langerman, Samantha Long, and Brandon Storch, all of Attica;

    • Padraic Brazeau, of Cowlesville;

    • Barbara Brown and Brooke Tisdale, both of Gainesville;

    • Holly Benkleman and Adrian McMahon, both of North Java;

    • Anthony Wolowiec, Madeleine Weisenburg, and Olivia Herrmann, all of Strykersville;

    • Jeffrey Mincer, of Varysburg;

    • Patrick Rice and Adam DeLaVergne, both of Perry; 

    • Paul Torrey, of Silver Springs; and

    • Megan Hollister, Michelle LaBelle, Collyn Frank, Jennifer Cummins, Sarah Ushurova, Aaron Almeter, Micaela Van Buren, Amanda Pahuta, and Tracy Stevenson, all of Warsaw.

Those on the president's list comprised of full-time students who earned a quality point index of 3.75.

GCC offers over 65 academic programs and certificates, including the new Marketing and Social Media concentration within the Business Administration program. Additionally, the new Nanotechnology degree with ECC focus’s on the microscopic scale for jobs in biology, chemistry, electrical engineering, medicine, and photovoltaics.

The college has seven campus locations throughout Western New York, as well as through its online learning program. College housing is available at College Village, Batavia. 

For further information about all of GCC's opportunities, go to www.genesee.edu.

Friday, February 3, 2017 at 12:31 pm

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The Arcade & Attica Railroad Corp recently received $1.3 million through the governor’s Passenger and Freight Rail Assistance Program. The funding will be used to rehabilitate a bridge and six miles of track to accommodate heavier rail cars.

“These investments not only support safe and reliable rail transportation, they also promote economic development and ensure growth in communities across the state,” said Sen. Patrick M. Gallivan, (R-C-I, Elma). 

New York awarded $25 million to 19 applicants through a competitive solicitation process. These investments will support track rehabilitation, capacity expansion, railroad bridge repairs, and economic development opportunities. 

Gallivan also says the Livonia, Avon & Lakeville Railroad Corp. in Livingston County received $1.1 million to rehabilitate yard tracks in Lakeville and Avon.

“I’m pleased that rail projects in Wyoming and Livingston counties are among those being funded.”

Additionally, $5.4 million in private and local funding is being leveraged through this state initiative. The funding will support projects that strengthen infrastructure and economic development throughout the state.

Friday, February 3, 2017 at 11:58 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Warsaw, Arcade, Pike.

Patrick L. Gugliuzza, 37, of Warsaw, was charged recently following a Nov. 1 investigation into welfare fraud. The Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office and the Department of Social Services charged Gugliuzza with welfare fraud in the fourth degree and offering a false instrument for filing in the first degree, both are felonies. He is accused of failing to report that he both had a roommate and was collecting rent for approximately five months. Subsequently, he allegedly collected $1,350 in benefits that he was not entitled to. If found guilty, he could face a one-year disqualification from receiving public assistance benefits. A second offense carries a two-year disqualification and a third offense carries a lifetime ban.

Vincent A. Schaub, 20, of Arcade, was charged Jan. 31 with: underage possession of alcohol, unlawful possession of marijuana; speed not reasonable and prudent; failure to keep right; driving while ability impaired by a drug; and driving while ability by a combination of drugs and alcohol. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies stopped Schaub after seeing him “making an erratic turn onto Perry Road” then driving down the left lane of traffic. During the traffic stop, he was allegedly found to be in possession of marijuana and alcohol and subsequently arrested for DWI following roadside field sobriety testing. Schaub was taken to the Sheriff’s Office where he supplied a breath sample, which allegedly showed a small amount of alcohol still in his system. He was then put through a drug influence evaluation, after which officials determined him to be impaired by alcohol, cannabis, and a central nervous system depressant. He was deemed unable to operate a vehicle safely. He was put in Wyoming County Jail on $500 cash bail or $2,500 bond. He is due in the Town of Sheldon Court March 6.

Jared J. Acquard, 23, of Freedom, was charged Jan. 29 with unlawful possession of marijuana, inadequate headlamp, and driving while ability impaired by a drug. Deputies say Acquard was stopped on Main Street, Arcade, due to a nonworking headlight. During the investigation, it was allegedly found that the suspect was in possession of marijuana. He was subsequently arrested for DWAI following field sobriety testing. He was taken to the Arcade Police Department where he was given a drug influence evaluation. Following the evaluation, officials determined Acquard to be impaired by cannabis and unable to drive safely. He is due in the Village of Arcade Court Feb. 22.

Benjamin Minervino, 41, of Arcade, was charged Feb. 2 with speed unreasonable and prudent, driving while intoxicated, and operating a vehicle with a BAC of .08 percent or higher. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies responded to an accident with a vehicle on its side on Route 39, Pike. The investigation showed Minervino as the driver of the truck. Deputies also say they noticed he smelled of alcohol, and he allegedly subsequently tested positive for the beverage in his system. He was taken to the Sheriff’s Office, where he provided a breath sample that allegedly showed a BAC of .08 percent. He is due in Pike Town Court March 14.

Wednesday, February 1, 2017 at 11:26 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Arcade, heroin, opioids, overdose, news.
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      Rene M. Sliwa

An Arcade woman was arrested Jan. 24 in connection with an overdose at a North Street, Arcade, residence.

Rene M. Sliwa, 29, was charged with two counts of endangering the welfare of a child and one count of criminal nuisance in the second degree. 

Police officials say a woman (not Sliwa) was brought to the Village Office in the afternoon of Jan. 23 for a suspected overdose. Officers were able to revive the woman through CPR. Approximately 11 hours later, the same victim was again brought to the Village Office for a suspected overdose, at which time officers were able to revive again.

Through investigation, a search warrant was obtained for the North Street home, where Sliwa was a renter, subsequently resulting in her arrest.

She was put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $2,000 cash bail and is due in Arcade Village Court at a later date.

Police officials say other charges are pending.

Monday, January 30, 2017 at 6:59 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, Arcade, education.

Quinn Smith, of Arcade, made the dean’s list for the fall 2016 semester at SUNY New Paltz 

Dean's List designation is reserved for students who excel academically and earn at least a 3.3 grade-point average in a semester with a full-time course load.

New Paltz is located 90 minutes from metropolitan New York City and supports approximately 8,000 undergraduate and graduate students. 

Tuesday, January 24, 2017 at 5:39 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, Arcade, Attica, Perry, Warsaw, education.

Several area students were named to SUNY Oswego’s fall 2016 dean’t list and president’l list.

The dean’s list recognizes students who received a grade point average of 3.3 to 3.79. Oswego students receiving a GPA of 3.8 to 4.0 earn president's list recognition.

Dean’s list honors go to:

    • Allison Jackson, of Arcade, a senior business administration major;

    • Breck J. Donohue, of Attica, a sophomore cinema and screen studies major;

    • Haley R. Parker, of Perry, a senior adolescence education major; and 

    • Brooke L. Lehr, of Warsaw, a sophomore journalism major.

President’s list honors go to:

    • Benjamin Aylsworth, of Attica, a senior majoring in history.

U.S. News Media Group counts Oswego among the top public regional universities in the North for 2017. The Princeton Review includes the college in its 2017 college guidebook "The Best Northeastern Colleges.” It’s also on the Princeton Review’s national list of "Green Colleges."

The 156-year-old college has an enrollment of about 8,000 students in its College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; School of Business; School of Communication, Media and the Arts; and School of Education.

Visit oswego.edu for more information.

 

Tuesday, January 24, 2017 at 5:25 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, education, Arcade, Castile, Perry, Attica.

Several local students made the fall 2016 semester dean’s list at Nazareth College, Rochester.

They include: 

    • John Beyer, of Arcade, who is studying psychology;

    • Katriel DeGolyer, who is studying English literature, and Alexandra Scharet, who is studying social work, both of Castile;

    • Zachary Lowery, of Perry, who is studying health sciences; and

    • McKenzie McLaughlin, of Attica, who is studying psychology.

A student's grade point average must be at least 3.5 or above, and they must complete 12 credit hours of graded work that semester in order to be included on the dean's list at Nazareth.

Nazareth College offers 60 majors, including education, health and human services, management, the fine arts, music, theater, math and science, foreign languages, and the liberal arts. The college supports 2,000 undergrads and 800 graduate students. 

Nazareth is recognized nationally for its Fulbright global student scholars and commitment to civic engagement. 

Friday, January 20, 2017 at 1:58 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, Arcade, education.

Allison Jackson, of Arcade, recently graduated with a bachelors degree in business administration from SUNY (State University of New York) Oswego and was recognized at the college's Commencement in December.

U.S. News Media Group counts SUNY Oswego among the top public regional universities in the north for 2017, and the Princeton Review includes Oswego in its 2017 college guidebook "The Best Northeastern Colleges" and in its national list of "Green Colleges."

As a 156-year-old college in the SUNY system, Oswego enrolls about 8,000 students in its College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; School of Business; School of Communication, Media and the Arts; and School of Education.

Visit oswego.edu for more information.

Tuesday, January 17, 2017 at 11:51 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, announcements, Warsaw, Arcade, Perry, Attica, Bennington.

Highlighting a decade of economic development growth for the county, the Wyoming County Business Center Inc. (WCBC) recently celebrated its 10th anniversary.

Established in 2006 by the county’s Board of Supervisors, the WCBC became the small business economic development agency in the county.

The not-for-profit local development corporation works with county economic development partners – the Industrial Development Agency (IDA), the Planning Department, the Chamber of Commerce & Tourism, and the Business Education Council (BEC) –  “to provide opportunities for business growth by promoting and assisting economic development projects that result in capital investments and job creation and retention in Wyoming County.”

The WCBC plays a vital role in the development of entrepreneurs, assistance of retail projects, micro lending, marketing for business attraction, and real estate redevelopment projects. It also plays an integral role in the development of shovel ready sites (at the stage where workers can be employed and construction can begin), and of both green sites (the practice of maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings and sites while minimizing the impact on human health and the environment) and “environmentally challenged” (contaminated) property for expanding businesses and businesses considering locating in the county.

Recently, Buffalo Business First recognized five Wyoming County communities, among 77, for having the strongest entrepreneurial spirit in Western New York, stating “the entrepreneurial spirit is alive and well in these communities.”

Of the 77 communities listed, locally they include, in order of ranking:

    • #21 the Town of Arcade – population 4,158, of which 1,216 are full-time workers and 119 (9.8 percent) are self-employed;

    • #25 Town of Bennington –  population of 3,316, with 1,204 full-time workers and 114 (9.5 percent) self-employed; 

    • #28 Town of Warsaw – population 4,989, of which 1,645 are full-time workers and 136 (8.3 percent) are self-employed;

    • #32 Town of Attica – population 7,520, with 1,343 full-time workers and 108 (8 percent) self-employed; and

    • #56 Town of Perry – population 4,497, of which 1,463 are full-time workers and 81 (5.5 percent) are self-employed.

According to the report, the statistics are from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2015 American Community Survey, which compiles the data at the local level. The rankings are based on the percentage who are self-employed.

To assist community entrepreneurs, the Business Center offers the entrepreneurship development program FastTrac New Venture. This program provides participants the necessary tools to refine their innovative business idea. 

Since its inception, the program has educated more than 120 entrepreneurs. It has enabled them to overcome barriers and challenges common in starting a new business while assisting them in building a strong, solid business plan. In turn, 53 businesses have started, thus creating more than 90 jobs in the county. Additionally, these jobs provide a source of new tax base both for real property and sales tax. 

“The program has been extremely successful and FastTrac is a core component of economic development growth and job creation in Wyoming County,” said WCBC President Jim Pierce.

The Business Center also administers a low-interest micro-loan program to assist new business startups and established retail businesses. The loans coordinate financial assistance and incentives with its economic development partners. Currently there are 14 businesses in the Center’s loan portfolio. 

In 2016 it also developed a new business attraction marketing program to draw attention to the county’s assets and its location as a great place to expand or locate new business. 

The marketing program and collateral marketing pieces that have been developed were the results of a series of focus group meetings with stakeholders. They worked to develop a marketing strategy promoting the attractiveness of Wyoming County for new business. They include a new marketing logo and tag line, and a website that highlights the business strengths of Wyoming County.

The website features a brochure and selling points for three targeted industries – agri-business, advanced manufacturing, and recreation and tourism businesses. It headlines three short videos featuring existing companies in the county. Representatives of each company bestow the benefits and successes they have realized being located within the county’s borders.

Additionally, the videos showcase the strength and attractiveness of the workforce, why these businesses are so successful in Wyoming County and why other businesses should consider a location here.

“We are proud to enter into our next decade and thank the Wyoming County Board of Supervisors and the Business Center’s Board of Directors. We are greatly appreciative of the generous FastTrac program sponsors – Tompkins Bank of Castile and Complete Payroll (the workforce development resources available to FastTrac participants through Community Action for Wyoming County), the program facilitators Jeff Fitch and Mike Fitch, along with numerous guest speakers and support from the IDA,” Pierce said. “Thank you to everyone who has played a role in the Business Center and our collective work to improve the economic viability of Wyoming County. 

“The Business Center will continue to provide a very important role in economic development through assisting retail projects looking to grow and expand, micro lending, business attraction marketing and entrepreneurship development with the FastTrac program. We are a network, an information hub, a partner, a resource connector and an advisor all focused on strengthening economic development in the county.”

Visit wyomingcountyny.org to see the most recently added recreation and tourism business attraction video. Contact Pierce at jpierce@wycoida.org or (585) 786- 3764 for attractive incentives and resources available.

To learn more about the Kauffman Foundation’s FastTrac New Venture Program or upcoming informational open house for start-up and small businesses visit www.wycobusiness.org or contact Jennifer Tyczka at jtyczka@wycoida.org or (585) 786- 3764.

Monday, January 16, 2017 at 7:12 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, education, Arcade, Attica, Warsaw.

Several Wyoming County students have been named to the dean’s list at Buffalo State College for the fall 2016 semester. These students have have completed at least 12 credit hours and a grade point average of 3.5 or higher.

They include:

    • Sabina Mogavero, who is majoring in art education K-12, and Rory Butts, who is majoring in childhood education, both of Arcade;

    • Kendra Galligan, who is majoring in English 7-12, and Alexis Burger, both of Warsaw; and

    • Landon Moreis, who is majoring in fashion and textile technology; Alexandra Hamilton, who is majoring in business administration; and Michelle Muniak, who is majoring in interior design, all of Attica.

Buffalo State, founded in 1871, offers more than 160 undergraduate programs in the arts, sciences, professions, and education.

Friday, January 13, 2017 at 6:28 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Attica, Arcade, Perry, Warsaw.

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun Jan. 12.

Kimberly Gillard, who is accused of a crime in Attica, pled not guilty to: criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fourth degree, a Class C felony; two counts of promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony; and conspiracy in the fourth degree, a Class E felony. Bail continues. The case has been adjourned to Jan. 30.

Larenzo Eaton, who committed a crime in Arcade, pled guilty to criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony. Sentencing is scheduled April 6.

Robert Geandreau, who committed a crime in Attica, pled guilty to driving while intoxicated as a Class D felony, and operating a motor vehicle without a court-ordered ignition interlock device, a Class A misdemeanor. He is held without bail in the Wyoming County jail. Sentencing is scheduled for March 16.

Shannon Garland, who committed a crime in Arcade, pled guilty to petit larceny, a misdemeanor. Sentencing is scheduled April 6. 

Grayson Stock, who is accused of committing a crime in Attica, had his case adjourned to Feb. 2.

Angel Lopez Jr., who committed a crime in Perry, pled guilty to speeding, and aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the second degree, a misdemeanor. He was sentenced to a one-year conditional discharge and fined $1,300.

Lynda Brown, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to a one year determinate prison term with one year post-release supervision and restitution of $2,126.

Ryan Donnelly, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, was sentenced to one to three years in prison, plus fees and surcharges on a violation of probation.

Friday, January 6, 2017 at 12:00 pm

The following were in Wyoming County Court Jan. 3 before Judge Michael Griffith.

Richard Kilner, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to six months in jail, five years probation, fined $2,000, and is responsible to pay fees and surcharges. He was convicted of aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the first degree, a Class E felony.

The following were in court before Judge Michael Mohun Jan. 5.

Cheleena Green, who is accused of a crime in Arcade, pled not guilty to: attempted assault in the first degree, a Class C felony; assault in the second degree, a Class D felony; and criminal possession of a weapon in the fourth degree, a misdemeanor. Motions are scheduled for March 16. Bail was set at $10,000.

Michael Marrale, who is charged with a crime in Attica, pled not guilty to: attempted assault in the first degree, a Class C violent felony; two counts of reckless endangerment in the first degree, Class D felonies; and driving while intoxicated, driving while intoxicated per se, and criminal mischief in the third degree, all are Class E felonies; criminal contempt in the second degree, a misdemeanor; and driving on roadways laned for traffic, a violation. The Per Se law is based not on the observations of the arresting police officer, but the results obtained from an intoxilyzer machine. Motions are scheduled for March 16.

Kelly Seeler, who committed a crime in Attica, successfully completed interim probation. Seeler was sentenced on the reduced charge of arson in the fifth degree, a misdemeanor, to three years probation and $14,401.37 in restitution.

Alan Hartman Sr., who committed a crime in Eagle, pled guilty to unlawful manufacture of methamphetamine in the third degree, a Class D felony. Sentencing is scheduled Feb. 2.

Michael Sheehan, who committed a crime in Gainesville, pled guilty to criminal contempt in the first degree, a Class E felony. An order of protection was issued. Sentencing is scheduled March 30.

Patrick Hardy, who committed a crime in Genesee Falls, was sentenced to four months of weekends in jail, five years probation and issued an eight-year order of protection. He was convicted of assault in the second degree, a Class D felony.

Stephanie Stuart, who committed a crime in Perry, pled guilty to aggravated driving while intoxicated with a child, a Class E felony, and driving on roadways laned for traffic, a violation. Stuart was sentenced to one year interim probation. Her case is adjourned to Dec. 21.

Dakota Leiser, who is accused of a crime in Perry, had the case adjourned to Feb. 2.

Erik Kohls, who is accused of a crime in Warsaw, pled not guilty to grand larceny in the fourth degree, a Class E felony. The case has been adjourned to March 30 for a pre-plea investigation.

Elizabeth Mattingly, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, was resentenced on a violation of probation to five years probation plus fines and fees.

Kimberly White, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, admitted to a violation of her conditional discharge. She is held without bail in Wyoming County Jail. She is due in court Feb. 23.

Friday, December 30, 2016 at 2:54 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Warsaw, Perry, Arcade, Attica.

Warsaw Police Chief Peter Hoffmeister was once told by a 24-year-old heroin addict: Your mind gets so wrapped up in it you'd do anything to get it. When you hear about someone overdosing, you try to find out where he got it from because it must have been really good. In your mind you think, it’s not the heroin that killed him… he was weak or had a health issue. 

That 24-year-old…he was into heroin a year prior to the above statement.

Just 16 days ago the Wyoming County Drug Task Force (DTF) descended on a home on Cherry Street in Perry, whose owners are suspected of dealing heroin. In that same week, Perry Police responded to two overdoses. In both cases, Narcan – a nasal spray used for an opioid emergency such as an overdose – was used to save their lives. 

Roy Lawrence, 45, and Heidi Hopkins, 43, 17 Cherry St., were arrested after DTF agents executed a search warrant and allegedly found a “quantity” of heroin, pills, and other drug paraphernalia in the home.

Both suspects were charged with criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony. They were also put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $50,000 cash bail. 

DTF officials say other charges and arrests are possible in this case.

While Michael J. Regatuso II, “the county’s biggest heroin dealer” according to Wyoming County District Attorney Donald O’Geen, was tried, convicted and now serving a 12-year stint in prison, is off the streets, the county saw an initial decrease in heroin activity. 

That was in May 2015.

The decrease was short-lived.

While both Arcade and Attica police chiefs say they aren’t having a big issue with heroin in their respective villages, between November and December Perry law enforcement has responded to four heroin/opioid overdoses. All were saved by using Narcan.

However, in the last year, the village has one confirmed death due to overdose, Police Chief Mike Grover says.

In Warsaw, Hoffmeister says there have been 10 overdoses in the past year, with two ending up in deaths. While Narcan was used to save eight of those who overdosed, two were dead before law enforcement arrived. Of those 10, two were in September, two in October, and two in December – as of this posting. The youngest person they encountered was 17 years old and the oldest 55.

“Three of the houses where overdoses occurred were within a stone's throw away from each other,” Hoffmeister said. “A 35-year-old male and a 20-year-old male were both able to be saved. A 55-year-old female died. As far as we could tell, none of the victims knew each other.”

The two deaths in Warsaw also appeared to be from what is called a “speedballing,” which is using a mixture of cocaine and heroin. Local authorities also say it sounded like they were both trying heroin for the first time.

“All law enforcement can do in an overdose call is respond…and if we get there in time we can deliver the Narcan and hopefully save their lives,” Grover said. 

“It sounds like they are snoring, when they are really aspirating to death. A lot of times because we know who they are, we know it's heroin,” Hoffmeister said. “And what happens is we walk in and they are dead and not breathing, we administer the Narcan and because it’s like an adrenaline rush, they jump up and are ready to fight or they get mad because we ‘ruined’ their high.”

Additionally, not only are the drugs dangerous to the user, there is an inherent danger to first responders when responding to such calls – they don’t know exactly what drug has been used or is in the vicinity. While they do wear protective gloves on a scene, officials say they aren’t 100-percent guaranteed to keep you safe. However, police also say that most users are good about capping the needles or not carrying them on their person.

“Luckily, we have Narcan we can administer to save people and lucky we have a good ambulance crew that is behind us on these calls,” Grover said. “Having the first responders who can get to a call within minutes is imperative in saving their (drug user’s) life. While there is no real time frame to get Narcan in their system, you start getting into trouble if the brain is without oxygen 4 to 6 minutes. With heroin being cut with so many other things, you really don’t know what you are going to encounter.”

While the use of heroin or other opioids seems to span all age groups, both chiefs also say it almost equally affects both genders – usage appears to be a bit higher among females.

“When I started (in law enforcement) it was weed and coke (cocaine) on the weekends,” Hoffmeister said. “Once pills started to come out things began to escalate. Now people can't get pills so they turn to heroin. Heroin numbs you to the world. The addiction is so quick that the person then continues to use just to feel ‘normal.’

“For us it's frustrating, if we see a doctor overprescribing we can deal with that and work with that. But people are getting heroin from Batavia, Buffalo, Rochester, then bringing it back here.”

While local police try and work with the larger cities to get the drugs off the streets, when one dealer is arrested, another takes their place. Locally, the dealers aren’t making “big” money, police say. They are making just enough to support their habit.

An addict needs to reach the “ah ha” moment to get themselves clean, says Hoffmeister. One recovering addict had told him it wasn’t until he realized that his wife and kids were his priorities that he was able to sober up.

“He told me the urge will always be there, but for now, he’s doing well. Heroin is a secretive drug. Pot is social. Cocaine is social. Heroin is different…you want to be alone or with only a couple of other people. It’s different in that respect.”

“Drugs affect everyone differently,” Grover said. “An addict can go and get medication to help curb the addiction, but there are those occasions that they may become addicted to that medication, or no longer take it, or they sell it to go get more heroin.”

While reaching the “ah ha” moment is important in recovery, it is up to the user to get treatment and help. Officials say a year in jail also helps in the detox process.

“For the rest of your life there is going to be a struggle,” Grover said. “It's a lifelong battle to stay clean.”

“I don't worry about many things on this job,” Hoffmeister said. “But this one issue does keep me up at night trying to figure out how to combat it. It scares me as a father and the chief of police. As a community we need to come together and help the people who are addicted and get them treatment. Together it can be done. My policy is to save everyone we can.”

While the system is not perfect by any means, the chief believes there needs to be reform in the healthcare system, more education for both children and adults alike, and people need to "toughen up and be taught early how to handle their problems differently."

See related: Perry drug bust yields 'quantity' of heroin and other drugsRegatuso sentenced to 12 years in prison

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