Arcade

Friday, September 29, 2017 at 12:11 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Perry, Arcade, Java.

Two county men charged with sex crimes were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun Sept. 28.

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       Clifford Murch

Clifford Murch, 21, of Perry, was sentenced to two years in prison, five years post-release supervision, and fees and surcharges on the conviction of rape in the second degree, a Class D felony.

Mark Owens, 50, of Arcade, pled guilty to criminal sexual act in the third degree, a Class E felony.

Murch was charged Dec. 8 with rape in the second degree and endangering the welfare of a child under 17 years old.

In August 2016 Murch was 20 years old and on parole for an unrelated crime when he raped the child. At the time of his arrest, he was put in Wyoming County Jail on $20,000 cash bail.

In February he pled not guilty to the crime and bail was set again at $20,000 cash. An order of protection was also issued.

During his Aug. 30 court appearance, he pled guilty to the rape charge.

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       Mark Owens

Owens was charged April 20 with sexual abuse in the third degree following an investigation of an incident that happened in the Town of Java.

During his recent court appearance, he waived indictment on the abuse charge, as well as criminal sexual act in the third degree, a Class E felony, and sexual abuse in the third degree, a Class B felony.

Orders of protection were issued against both men.

Owens is scheduled for sentencing Dec. 7.

Friday, September 29, 2017 at 11:08 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Attica, Arcade, Warsaw.

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun Sept. 28.

Richard Mason, who is accused of a crime in Arcade, pled not guilty to strangulation in the second degree, a Class D felony, and assault in the third degree, a Class A misdemeanor. Motions are scheduled Nov. 2. Orders of protection were also issued.

Melissa Baker, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to six months in jail and five years probation on the conviction of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fourth degree, a Class C felony. Restitution of $80 has been paid. She is also responsible for a $50 DNA fee.

Daren Tingue, who committed a crime in Arcade, pled guilty to criminal possession of precursors of methamphetamine, a Class E felony, and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree, a Class A misdemeanor. The case has been adjourned to Dec. 7.

The following, who is an inmate at a State Correctional Facility, was in Court Sept. 27.

Bail is set for state inmate cases for two reasons:

    • In the event that the inmate’s current sentence is overturned on appeal or the inmate’s sentence is about to expire the bail will kick in on the new case and the inmate would be turned over to the Wyoming County jail while the new case is pending; and

    • When bail is placed on an inmate it follows the inmate so when they are moved to different facilities it is one way for them to be found and also the state system knows there is another case still pending.

Hassan Brown pled not guilty to promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony. Motions are scheduled Dec. 20. Bail was set at $5,000.

Monday, September 25, 2017 at 5:04 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Arcade.

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File photo

Wyoming County Chamber & Tourism and the Arcade Area Chamber of Commerce are set to once again host Arcade’s Main & More event from 4 to 7:30 p.m. Oct. 5. Beginning and ending at the Arcade Chamber office – 228 Main St. – visitors can meander along Main Street for an evening of visiting merchants and their partnering businesses.

The concept is simple, Main Street businesses partner with off-Main Street businesses, giving visitors the opportunity to learn more about local merchants in the area. Planned activities include music, door prizes, wine tastings, a car seat check, a hurricane relief fundraiser, and more.

At the beginning of their journey, event-goers will receive a map listing participating businesses. With a map in hand, participants are encouraged to visit every location listed where they receive a “check-in” stamp. When the map is completed, revelers are entered to win door prizes donated by the participating merchants.

A $10 “swag bag” is also available, but it must be pre-purchased through the website www.wycochamber.org. Commemorative event glasses will be available for $5 each the night of the event. The event is free and includes refreshments at stops throughout the event.

“This is always a fun event that brings customers to downtown businesses and offers a unique opportunity to learn more about what is available from the local business community. It’s also a great time mingling with friends and neighbors,” said Chamber & Tourism President Scott Gardner.

“By combining the off-Main and Main Street businesses, both the business owners and customers get the opportunity for exposure and networking. This has been a very successful event in past years, and I thank everyone involved for making it another great success.”

For more information on attending call (585) 786-0307 or visit  www.wycochamber.org

Friday, September 22, 2017 at 3:56 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Warsaw, Attica, Arcade, Castile, Perry.

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun Sept. 20 and are from State Correctional Facilities.

Bail is set for state inmate cases for two reasons:

    • In the event that the inmate’s current sentence is overturned on appeal or the inmate’s sentence is about to expire the bail will kick in on the new case and the inmate would be turned over to the Wyoming County jail while the new case is pending; and

    • When bail is placed on an inmate it follows the inmate so when they are moved to different facilities it is one way for them to be found and also the state system knows there is another case still pending.

Luis Pagan was sentenced to seven years in prison, five years post-release supervision, and surcharges and fees. He was convicted of assault in the second degree, a Class D felony. The sentence is to run concurrently to his current term.

Patrick Hill was sentenced to one-and-one-half years in prison and one year post-release supervision on the conviction of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class D felony. The sentence is to run consecutively with his current sentence.

James Smith had his case adjourned to Oct. 25 for a hearing.

Anthony Placido was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison on the conviction of attempted promoting prison contraband, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. The sentence is to run consecutively to his current term. Placido is also responsible for all surcharges incurred.

Calvin Benjamin pled guilty to attempted promoting prison contraband, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. He was indicted for promoting prison contraband, a Class D felony. Sentencing is scheduled Nov. 8.

Bryant Gibbs was in court for motions. His case was adjourned to Oct. 5 for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Ryan Boodhoo pled not guilty to promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony. Motions are scheduled Nov. 8. Bail was set at $5,000.

Carlos Corrales pled not guilty to promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony. Motions are scheduled Nov. 8. Bail was set at $5,000.

Dominick Coffer was in court for motions. A trial is scheduled Dec. 14.

Benedict Agostini had his case adjourned to Oct. 11 for motions and a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Donald Green was in court for motions. The case has been adjourned to Oct. 11 for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Steven Green was in court for motions. The case has been adjourned to Oct. 11 for an appearance.

Deoz Miller-Harris was in court for motions. The case has been adjourned to Oct. 11 for an appearance.

The following were in court before Mohun Sept. 20 and 21.

Jonathon Bucknam, who is accused of a crime in Perry, was in court for motions. The case has been adjourned to Oct. 4 for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Aaron Schinsing, who is accused of a crime in Arcade, had his case adjourned to Dec. 21 for pre-plea.

Cory Dahl, who is accused of a crime in Castile, had his case adjourned to today.

Eduardo Bautista-Cruz, who committed a crime in Genesee Falls, waived indictment on burglary in the second degree, a Class C felony, and unlawful imprisonment in the first degree, a Class E felony. He pled guilty to attempted burglary in the second degree, a Class D felony. He was sentenced to a conditional discharge and surcharges. An order of protection was also issued.

Stephen Harder, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to four years in prison with 10 years post-release supervision, fees and surcharges. He was convicted of attempted course of sexual conduct against a child in the second degree, a Class E felony. An order of protection was also issued.

Friday, September 22, 2017 at 3:04 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Perry, Arcade.
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      Erin True

Erin True, 34, of Perry, was charged Sept. 21 with grand larceny in the fourth degree and identity theft in the third degree. True allegedly used the credit card number from a previous boyfriend to pay $440 on her Dish Network account. Perry Police say the victim contacted police when he noticed discrepancies on his credit card account. True was arraigned in Perry Village Court and put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $1,000. She is due in court at a later date.

Stephanie Larrabee, 27, of Arcade, was charged Sept. 18 with issuing a bad check. Larrabee is accused of writing a check for $294.30, which was returned for non-sufficient funds. She is due in the Town of Sardinia Court later this month.

Thursday, September 21, 2017 at 12:52 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, accident, news, Java, Arcade, Varysburg, Strykersville.

Failure to stop at a stop sign resulted in an injury accident in Java late Wednesday morning.

Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say, Ja-Ryan Marquis Steen, 24, of Arcade, was headed east on Beaver Meadow Road when he failed to stop at the stop sign at Route 98.

The investigation showed he left the east side of Route 98, which caused the tanker to enter a deep ravine and rollover onto the driver's side of the vehicle.

Steen was extricated by emergency personnel after a heavy wrecker tow truck moved the cab of the truck. He was taken to ECMC in Buffalo via Mercy Flight for treatment of chest and leg injuries.

Officials say Steen was driving a milk tanker truck and had just left a nearby farm on Beaver Meadow Road moments before the accident.

Assisting deputies at the scene included North Java, Strykersville and Varysburg fire departments, and the Wyoming County Hazmat team and Monroe medics.

The investigation is ongoing.

Friday, September 15, 2017 at 3:16 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Arcade, Castile, Wethersfield.

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun Sept. 14.

Donald Krohn, who is accused of committing a crime in Arcade, pled not guilty to driving while intoxicated and driving while intoxicated per se, both as Class E felonies, and criminal mischief in the fourth degree, a misdemeanor. The Per Se law is based not on the observations of the arresting police officer, but the results obtained from a breath alcohol testing machine. It is this result that dictates the offense as well potential certain legal presumptions. The case has been adjourned to Dec. 7.

Maila Mattson, who is accused of committing a crime in Arcade, pled not guilty to driving while intoxicated and driving while intoxicated per se, as unclassified misdemeanors, and resisting arrest, a Class A misdemeanor. Motions are scheduled Nov. 9.

Aarni Mattson, who is accused of a crime in Arcade, pled not guilty to driving while intoxicated and driving while intoxicated per se, as Class E felonies. Motions are scheduled Nov. 9.

Phillip Goodwill, who is accused of a crime in Arcade, had his case adjourned to Oct. 12.

Cory Dahl, who allegedly committed a crime in Castile, had his case adjourned to Sept. 21.

Jeffrey Snyder, who committed a crime in Wethersfield, admitted to a violation of interim probation. Sentencing is scheduled Nov. 9.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017 at 11:53 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Java, Perry, Arcade, Warsaw, Business.

Information sourced from a press release

The Arts Council for Wyoming County (ACWC) and the Wyoming County Chamber of Commerce and Tourism announce the fourth annual Wyoming County Women's Business Summit. The event will be held from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sept. 28 at Beaver Hollow Conference Center/Biggest Loser Resort Niagara, 1083 Pit Road, Java Center. The theme of this year’s summit is “Close to Home.”

The keynote speaker for the event is local business owner and entrepreneur Keirsten Schaffer. Participants will also attend several break-out sessions, a luncheon of locally sourced foods, and a panel discussion featuring Wyoming County business women.

"We are very pleased to co-host the fourth Women's Business Summit with the ACWC at Beaver Hollow,” said Wyoming County Chamber President Scott Gardner. "Our continued goal is to bring women business owners, professionals, and entrepreneurs, a unique opportunity to hear from dynamic presenters on a wide range of issues relevant to the personal and professional lives of Wyoming County’s professional women in business."

Shaffer, the owner of Lila Pilates in Perry, began her career in community and economic development in Livingston and Wyoming counties. In 2001, she co-founded the Perry Farmers’ Market. She also spent four years as a healthcare marketing consultant for the Wyoming County Community Health System.

In 2006, Shaffer was diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia. Subsequently, she put her efforts on the study of bodywork, movement, and wellness. At the Summit, she will discuss her journey to wellness and how she found movement and massage therapy to be the key to her overall health. She says the therapy ultimately improves and enhances her work performance.

"Every year we incorporate the ACWC’s year-long theme into the Women’s Summit,” said ACWC Executive Director Jacqueline Hoyt. “I am eager to hear the different interpretations regarding ‘Close to Home’ within the context of our women owned businesses or women in the work place. I am especially eager to hear how our keynote speaker Keirsten Schaffer will weave her information about the human body into the theme.”

Other presenters include:

    • Negotiating Skills: Victoria Reynolds, deputy district director, U.S. Small Business Administration

    • Multi-Generational Workplaces – Finding the Strengths: JoBeth Rath, trainer/Goodwill Industries

    • Personal Branding: Kelly Tracy, recruiter, Pioneer/Navient

    • Social Media, Where do You Want to Be?: Jessica Seymour, partner MOTIV Digital Media 

 Panel discussion speakers include:

    • Sarah Keeler, owner/instructor – Genesee Dance Theatre, Perry

    • Lisa Seewaldt, owner – Ash-Lin’s Elegant Rose Florist and Gift Shop, Warsaw

    • Laura DeBadts, independent senior sales director – Mary Kay, Warsaw

    • Sarah Billings, owner / Lead Stylist – slb salon & boutique Inc., Perry

    • Sandra Pirdy, owner – Creekside Fabrics, and motivational speaker/ instructor, Arcade

 The daylong summit is co-sponsored by the Beaver Hollow Conference Center/Biggest Loser Resort Niagara, Women’s OB-GYN of Warsaw, and Silver Lake Brewing Project in Perry.

General admission is $80 per person; $70 for ACWC and Chamber members. Seating is limited.

For more information or to register email Kelly Ashcraft at kelly@wycochamber.org or call the Chamber office at (585) 786-0307.

Monday, September 11, 2017 at 11:50 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Perry, Arcade.
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     Nichole Dacey       Jessica Ruch

Nichole Dacey, 30, and Jessica Ruch, 35, both of Perry, were each charged Sept. 6 with one count of burglary in the second degree and two counts of petit larceny. The duo is accused of stealing a television from an apartment they shared with a friend. Additionally, Perry Police say they then entered the next door neighbor’s apartment while they were not home and stole their TV. Both alleged thefts are said to have happened Aug. 31. Officials also say the suspects then sold the TVs to a pawn shop in the Rochester area. Dacey and Ruch were picked up by the Livingston County Sheriff’s Office on arrest warrants and turned over to the Perry Police Department.

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    Summer Spencer

Summer Spencer, 37, of Arcade, was charged Sept. 7 with welfare fraud in the fourth degree and offering a false instrument to file in the first degree, both as felonies. Spencer is accused of failing to report everyone who was living in the household. By failing to report everyone, she collected more than $22,000 in benefits she was not entitled to. She is due in the Town of Warsaw Court Sept. 11.

Thursday, September 7, 2017 at 12:28 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Warsaw, Attica, Arcade, Perry.
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    Shawn Hunter     Jenna Josephite

Members of the Wyoming County Drug Task Force arrested two individuals for allegedly selling crack cocaine in Warsaw.

Shawn Hunter, 33, and Jenna Josephite, 28, were charged Aug. 31 with criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree, both as Class B felonies. Officials in the Sheriff’s Office say Hunter, of Rochester, and Josephite, of Batavia, are suspected of selling a large quantity of the drug to a person that had been under surveillance by the DTF.

According to officials, the incident happened in the parking lot at the Warsaw Shopping Plaza, Main Street, Warsaw.

Hunter was put in Wyoming County Jail without bail. Josephite was jailed in lieu of $20,000 cash bail.

Task Force members were assisted at the scene by uniform members of the Sheriff’s Office, the New York State, and Warsaw Village police departments.

The DTF includes officers from the Sheriff’s Office, as well as from the Arcade, Attica, Perry and Warsaw police departments.

Suspected illegal drug activity can be reported to the confidential drug tip line at (585) 786-8965.

Friday, September 1, 2017 at 4:07 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Attica, Arcade, Gainesville, Perry, Warsaw.

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun Aug. 31.

Matthew Zakrzewski, who is accused of committing a crime in Attica, pled not guilty to assault in the second degree, a Class D felony; criminal mischief in the third degree, a Class E felony; and these charges as Class A misdemeanors -- criminal mischief in the fourth degree, menacing in the second degree, and criminal trespass in the second degree. A pre-plea hearing is scheduled Nov. 30.​

Darren Tingue Jr., who is accused of a crime in Arcade, had his case adjourned to Sept. 21 for motions.

Jose Serrano, who committed a crime in Arcade, pled guilty to two counts of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony. Sentencing is scheduled Nov. 30.

Ervin Delude Sr., who committed a crime in Gainesville, was sentenced to one-and-three-quarters to three-and-one-half years in prison on each count of two counts of aggravated family offense, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. The sentences are to run concurrently. He is also responsible for all fees and surcharges.

Gerald Keech, who committed a crime in Perry, pled guilty to grand larceny in the fourth degree, a Class E felony. Sentencing is scheduled Oct. 26. Keech is being held without bail in Wyoming County Jail.

Christopher King, who committed a crime in Warsaw, successfully completed interim probation. He was sentenced to three years probation on the reduced charge of conspiracy in the fifth degree, a misdemeanor. Restitution was paid in full.

Jeffrey Snyder II, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, had a violation of probation hearing set for Sept. 13. He is being held without bail in Wyoming County Jail.

Franklin Cook, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, admitted to a violation of probation. The case has been adjourned to Oct. 12.

Joelle Good, who committed a crime in Warsaw, had a violation of probation hearing set for Sept. 22.

Wednesday, August 30, 2017 at 2:16 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Attica, Arcade, Perry, Warsaw.

In a report dated Aug. 21 by New York Upstate, Wyoming County ranks fourth in the least crime-ridden counties in New York State. The county reports 797 violent and property crimes combined per 100,000 people. Nearby Allegany County boasts 11 fewer and Putnam County has the least number of violent/property crimes with 609.

According to information culled from the Crime in New York State 2015 Preliminary Data report, statewide crime per 100,000 people between 2006 and 2015 dropped 20.7 percent – from 2,475.7 to 1,964.1. Violent Crime dropped 13 percent – from 434.2 to 378 per 100,000, and property crime decreased 22.3 percent – from 2,041.5 to 1,586.1.

Wyoming County had a total of 1,032.2 crimes – 141.9 violent and 890.3 property – in 2015, per 100,000 people.

The report states that crime reached an all-time low in 2015 since statewide reporting began in 1975.

Nearby Genesee and Erie counties were counted in the top 25 most crime-ridden counties, with Genesee ranking 14 – 2,040.7 total crimes – 195.9 violent and 1,844.8 property, and Erie County coming in at the fifth most crime-ridden county with a total of 2,829.8 crimes, of which 410.8 are violent and 2,418.9 are property crimes.

Additionally, more than half of Western New York counties are ranked in the top 25 most crime-ridden counties in the state. Of the five counties listed including Erie and Genesee, Orleans (1,614.3 total crimes per 100,000 people) is the least crime ridden and Niagara County (2,778.2) ranks number one. Chautauqua came in at number eight with 2,515.5 total violent and property crimes per 100,000 people.

What makes Wyoming County one of the safest places in the state to live? Local law enforcement and the District Attorney’s office credit its community.

“First of all we live in a community with hard-working people who take pride in their families, property and their community as a whole,” said Wyoming County District Attorney Donald O’Geen. “Second, the one thing that stands out to me when you mention the other counties and their crime rates is that in Wyoming County we (the chiefs, sheriff, troopers, probation, and my staff) take the approach that we are all on the same team, so we generally are all pulling in the same direction.”

“I agree with District Attorney O'Geen with respect that our community here in Wyoming County is a very hard-working group of people who do take pride in their families, property and the community as a whole,” said Attica Police Chief Dean Hendershott. “The core values of the citizens in our county is amazing.”

The joint cooperation and investment into its communities are equally shared in all aspects of law enforcement throughout the county and beyond, officials say. The interagency communication, partnering and general idea of "let's get the job done" are paramount. 

“We have all but eliminated ‘turf’ issues among departments,” O’Geen said. “We embrace new ideas and technologies such a treatment courts, re-entry programs, body cameras, aggressive welfare fraud investigations, and a lean but highly efficient drug task force.”

“I believe the residents of Wyoming County believe in public safety and that it is a core function of government on every level, which in turn garnishes support at their respective legislature or boards,” said Wyoming County Sheriff Greg Rudolph. “Additionally, Wyoming County law enforcement agencies have the vast majority of their deputies, officers and troopers living here in their community. They have a vested interest and pride in serving and protecting the area where they grew up and where their children are being raised.”

Wyoming County finds itself leading on public safety issues, as opposed to following, says O’Geen. Additionally, the Board of Supervisors gives its full support to public safety issues.

“They recognize that public safety is one of the primary functions of government and they fully support a unified criminal justice system,” O’Geen said. “My perception is that our village governments take that same position.”

There is a combined total of 49 full-time and 32 part-time officers in Wyoming County, which includes law enforcement from the villages of Attica, Arcade, Perry, and Warsaw, and the Sheriff’s Office. Additionally, there are eight full-time and seven part-time employees in the Communications Division of the Sheriff’s Office, and 32 full-time and 11 part-time officers in the Jail Division. The numbers do not reflect the civilian clerks in the respective departments, nor the crossing guards.

“We also receive a lot of information and cooperation from our community, which in turn results in both deterrence and prosecution,” Rudolph said. “As Don mentioned, our law enforcement community has a team approach and worries more about doing the right things and doing a professional job than receiving credit. A perfect example is the Drug Task Force.”

With the heroin/opioid epidemic that is hitting all communities, even the rural ones, the Drug Task Force does its fair share in keeping the crime rate lower, officials say. Each law enforcement agency is represented on the task force, however, it is not a full-time position. 

“More time and funding needs to be put towards the task force to help mitigate the flow of illegal drugs into our communities that is poisoning our youth, our future, but also individuals, family members and parents,” Hendershott said. 

“As the sign in my office says, ‘It is amazing what you can accomplish if you don't care who gets the credit’ (Harry S. Truman). This is the common goal and purpose of law enforcement in Wyoming County. In my 27 years as a police officer I can't recall such cooperation, not only within the county but with the State, Federal and out of county law enforcement. Sept. 11 forged such relationships and cooperation.”

The District Attorney’s office continues to be highly aggressive with the most dangerous criminals by holding them accountable for their actions. The Office takes a strong stance against heroin dealers, burglars and domestic-violence perpetrators, which make a difference in keeping crime down, officials say.

“By holding them accountable, we are creating a culture where they know it will not be tolerated and in some cases that culture is driving criminals right out of the county,” O’Geen said. 

The jail runs a highly disciplined operation to ensure accountability, Rudolph says, but also boasts a school and 14 programs that range from religious to substance abuse rehab to parenting to assist in rehabilitation.

All law enforcement officials in the county agree, they approach every call as problem solvers, putting the community first.

“In light of the attacks against law enforcement officers around the country, the people of Wyoming County have been nothing but kind, cordial and extremely supportive of our mission and work,” Rudolph said. “As with any group of people, there is a 1-percent rule that does make our duties extremely difficult at times, however, the constant professionalism displayed by the men and women in law enforcement in our county provides for a safe result nearly every time.”

Tuesday, August 29, 2017 at 12:05 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Arcade.
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     Hal E. Meacham

A Cattaraugus County man was arrested Aug. 25 following an investigation by the Arcade Village Police Department and the New York State Police, Machias Barracks.

Arcade Police officers say, as one of the officers was walking back to his vehicle following a traffic stop on Route 98 near Brown School House Road Aug. 23, Hal E. Meacham, of Farmersville, pulled up behind the patrol car. Meacham allegedly got out of his vehicle and began a “dialog” with the officer, saying he was “out of his jurisdiction.”

As a result of the investigation, not only was he allegedly found to have impersonated a police officer, several items of police equipment were seized as well.

He was charged with criminal impersonation in the second degree.

He was arraigned in the Town of Freedom Court and released on his own recognizance pending further court proceedings.

Tuesday, August 29, 2017 at 11:40 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, Business, Perry, Castile, Warsaw, Arcade.

Information based on a press release:

Tompkins Bank of Castile has announced the results of the fourth and final round of its quarterly Community Minute Challege.

Friends of Letchworth State Park, the local fourth-round participant, was not chosen.

That honor went to Gilda’s Club Rochester. Each quarterly winner is awarded $2,500.

Gilda’s has been serving the Greater Rochester community since 1959, first as Cancer Action Inc., and then in 2000 as Gilda’s Club. Its mission is to create welcoming communities of no cost support to those living with cancer – men, women, teens and children – along with their families and friends.

The winning organization for each Community Minute Challenge is determined by public voting on the Tompkins Bank of Castile Facebook page. Visitors watch one-minute videos produced by participating nonprofits and then vote for their favorite.

The first-round and third-round winners were both in Wyoming County. Respectively, they were Going to the Dogs Rescue, Main Street, Perry, an organization dedicated to helping homeless pets find loving forever homes; and Community Action for Wyoming County, which seeks to improve the quality of life of all people they serve by focusing on their needs, and encouraging them to realize their goals and become self-sufficient.

The second-round winner was Arc of Genesee Orleans, a resource of choice for people with disabilities and their families in both Genesee and Orleans counties.

Other organizations that participated in round four included:

    • Delphi Drug and Alcohol Council Inc. (Monroe County)

    • Friends of the Richmond Memorial Library (Genesee County)

    • Genesee Cancer Assistance (Genesee County)

    • Geneseo Parish Outreach Center (Livingston County)                         

“As proud members of the communities where we operate, we’re thankful for the important services that are provided by not-for-profit organizations in our area,” said Bank of Castile President and CEO John McKenna. "We’re thrilled to be able to bring attention to their positive work.”

Launched in August 2016, the challenge has awarded $10,000 in funds to local not-for-profit organizations. The program has helped organizations with much-needed money, and has increased exposure within their communities. 

“Winning the Community Minute Challenge was a huge boost for our organization in multiple ways,” said Going to the Dogs Rescue President Melissa Nichols-Henchen. “The monetary prize went a long way in purchasing vaccines and microchips for community dogs, giving us the ability to provide some basic care for animals who might not have had it otherwise."

Likewise, Community Action of Wyoming County Executive Director Connie Kramer was also grateful.

“Like many non-profits, we are able to provide programs through grants and designated donations,” Kramer said. “Of course, we also have day-to-day expenses that allow us to deliver our programs, so we were thrilled to be selected as a winner and apply the prize towards our operating budget." 

Tompkins Bank of Castile is a community bank with 16 offices in the five-county Western New York region. Services include complete lines of consumer deposit accounts and loans, business accounts and loans, and leasing. In addition, insurance is offered through an affiliate company, Tompkins Insurance Agencies, Wealth management, trust and investment services are provided through Tompkins Financial Advisors. Further information about the bank is available at www.bankofcastile.com.

Friday, August 18, 2017 at 3:07 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Arcade.

A multi-agency burglary investigation resulted in the arrests of two 18-year-olds and five juveniles Aug. 17.

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Chester Piwowarczyk      Dyllian S. Taggart

Dyllian S. Taggart, 18, of Delevan, and Chester F. Piwowarczyk, 18, of Springville, were each charged with multiple counts of burglary in the third degree, endangering the welfare of a child, criminal trespass, and criminal mischief.

Two juvenile females and three juvenile males were also arrested and petitioned to Family Court.

The New York State Police, Village of Arcade Police Department and the Cattaraugus County Sheriff’s Department arrested the seven suspects accused of burglarizing businesses, trespassing and criminal mischief in Wyoming and Cattaraugus counties.

The alleged crime spree spanned seven days and seven businesses: the Little Red Caboose Ice Cream Shop, Arcade; the Barbershop, Fresh Vapes, and Addie’s Custard Ice Cream Shop, all in Yorkshire; Pierce Milling, Delevan; and the Lime Lake Snack Shack, and Lakehouse Restaurant, both in Machias.

Taggart was put in Cattaraugus County Jail on $50,000 bail and Piwowarczyk was put in Wyoming County Jail on $10,000 bail.

Friday, August 11, 2017 at 12:19 pm

Kevin M. Johnson, 32, of Gainesville, was charged Aug. 8 with: driving while intoxicated as a felony due to a previous conviction within 10 years; circumventing an ignition interlock device; aggravated unlicensed operation of a vehicle in the third degree; and speed exceeding 55 mph. Johnson was stopped on Route 238, Attica, for allegedly speeding. During the investigation, Troopers say they detected an odor of alcohol, subsequently field sobriety testing was conducted as well as a breath test. His BAC was allegedly .08 percent. He is due in the Town of Attica Court Aug. 21.

Michael S. Slocum, 29, of Silver Springs, was charged Aug. 8 with: driving while intoxicated as a felony due to a previous conviction within 10 years; circumventing an interlock device; aggravated unlicensed operation of a vehicle in the first degree; drinking alcohol in a motor vehicle on a highway; moving from lane unsafely; and unlawful possession of marijuana. Troopers responded to a vehicle in a ditch on Wethersfield Road, Gainesville, in which Slocum allegedly appeared to be intoxicated. Additionally, Troopers say a small bag of marijuana was found. He was given field sobriety testing, which he is said to have failed. He was taken to the State Police barracks in Warsaw for processing where his BAC was allegedly recorded at .17 percent. He was put in Wyoming County Jail on $1,000 cash bail or $2,000 bond.

Matthew J. Wesolowski, 23, of Cowlesville, was charged Aug. 6 with driving while ability impaired by drugs and unlawful possession of marijuana. State Troopers say they responded to a 9-1-1 call of someone screaming and a loud bang on Church Road in the Town of Bennington. When police arrived on the scene they located a vehicle in a ditch. Troopers say the driver, Wesolowski, allegedly appeared to be under the influence of drugs and a small bag of marijuana was found in the vehicle. He was given field sobriety tests, which police say he failed and taken to State Police barracks in Warsaw. He was evaluated by a drug recognition expert and charged with the above offenses. He is due in the Town of Bennington Court Aug. 14.

Nicholas J. Kinmartin, 31, of Arcade, was charged Aug. 9 with 20 counts of petit larceny. Troopers say Kinmartin was seen on video approximately 17 times shoplifting merchandise from the 7-Eleven, Route 16, Yorkshire. The value of the items he allegedly stole was approximately $1,438. He was processed at the State Police barracks in Machias and released. He is due in the Town of Yorkshire Court later this month.

Thursday, August 10, 2017 at 5:04 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Arcade, Business.

The Little Red Caboose, Main Street, Arcade, is asking the community to keep its “eyes and ears open” due to alleged vandalism that had occurred at the business Aug. 5 and 6.

Owners of the business said the following on their Facebook page:

We were vandalized Saturday night and then broken into and vandalized Sunday night. They broke the door open to our storage shed and stole some things, cut and broke some things in mini golf, ripped up signs and Arcade & Attica Railroad pictures, cut holes into the new deck canopy, stole the mask from the “train guy” and broke things on top of the caboose.

“We are just a simple family trying to make ends meet while trying to create a place where friends and families can enjoy time together.”

Anyone with any information is asked to call the Arcade Police Department at (585) 492-3111.

Arcade Police officials are investigating the matter.

Thursday, August 3, 2017 at 11:54 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Shakespeare, play, Perry, Arcade.

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“Two households, both alike in dignity, In fair Verona, where we lay our scene, From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.”

The very first line in Shakespeare’s play “Romeo & Juliet” not only shapes the direction of the play itself but was the inspiration to this year’s stage setup of Shake on the Lake’s performance of the tragedy held Tuesday night in the Arcade Village Park.

Shake on the Lake performers have used several stage variations over the years including in the round – the audience is placed on at least three sides of the stage, a semicircle, and thrust – a stage that extends into the auditorium so that the audience is seated around three sides.

This year was the first year they used an "alleyway" configuration – the audience is set on two sides of the stage facing each other. In the case of this production, it allows the audience on both sides to play off each other's reactions. It creates a circular energy, says Director Chad Bradford.

“The walls in the set represent the ‘wall’ between two families and the riffs they have. With the climate in the world as an ‘us’ versus ’them’ kind of world, the play mirrored what is relevant now,” Bradford said.

Shake on the Lake’s production of “Romeo & Juliet” continues tonight at 6:30 at the Public Beach on Silver Lake, Perry. The cost is $10 per person or $35 for five people.

For more information on Shake on the Lake, including updates on events and fundraising, volunteer, and sponsorship opportunities visit www.shakeonthelake.org or email shakeonthelake@gmail.com.

See related: Shake on the Lake presents Shakespeare’s ‘Romeo & Juliet’

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Wednesday, August 2, 2017 at 6:54 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, education, announcements, Arcade, Attica, Perry, Warsaw.

More than 1,000 students completed their baccalaureate studies at State University of New York at Oswego in spring 2017 and were recognized during commencement in May.

A student who graduates with honors is indicated by the traditional Latin phrases summa cum laude, with highest honor (grade averages of 3.8 to 4.0); magna cum laude, with great honor (grade averages of 3.6 to 3.79); and cum laude, with honor (grade averages of 3.30 to 3.59).

Graduates from the area include:

    • Benjamin G. Aylsworth, of Attica, earned his degree in history, summa cum laude;

    • Haley R. Parker, of Perry, earned her degree in adolescence education, cum laude;

    • Alyssa R. Aldrich, of Warsaw, earned her degree in biochemistry; and

    • Teraisa S. Matuszak, of Arcade, earned her degree in career and technical education.

U.S. News Media Group counts SUNY Oswego among the top public regional universities in the North for 2017, and the Princeton Review includes Oswego in its 2017 college guidebook "The Best Northeastern Colleges" and in its national list of "Green Colleges."

A 156-year-old comprehensive college in the SUNY system, Oswego enrolls about 8,000 students in its College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; School of Business; School of Communication, Media and the Arts; and School of Education.

Visit oswego.edu/gradstudies for more information.

 

Friday, July 28, 2017 at 5:09 pm

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Press release, photo submitted:

Shake on the Lake, Wyoming County’s Professional Shakespeare Festival celebrates its sixth season by producing its first tragedy, "Romeo & Juliet." This year’s tour is the largest to date and takes the company to eight counties – Wyoming, Livingston, Genesee, Orleans, Erie, Niagara, Monroe and Cattaraugus.

Josh Rice, co-founder and producing artistic director of Shake on the Lake, organized the company in 2012 to fulfill a life’s dream to bring professional theater to his hometown of Silver Lake. Since then, this rural-based company has grown from three professional theater artists to nearly a dozen and from four live shows to 16 during this year’s "Romeo & Juliet: tour.

“After producing comedies for the first five seasons, this year we are doing our first tragedy,” Rice said. “ 'Romeo & Juliet' is Shakespeare’s best-known play and is actually quite funny for the first three acts. Then, things get really interesting. We are excited to show people how we can put a mirror up to these 400-year-old plays and reflect back to audiences things that are still as relevant now, in 2017.”

Chad Bradford, associate artistic director, and founding company member is directing this year’s performance. He has helped shape the creative and collaborative process that Shake on the Lake is known for in their fast, physical, and fun style of adapting Shakespeare.

“When wrestling with a play as beautiful, iconic and famous as 'Romeo & Juliet,' one is tempted to take the bits and pieces of their favorite productions and cram them into a single performance,” Bradford said. “However, with the collaborative, ensemble-based working model that we have established here at Shake on the Lake, I’m learning things about the play that I never knew before.”

Both men are both alumni of the National Arts Strategies Creative Community Fellowship program, which specializes in creative placemaking through the arts.

Rice’s program, the Mnemonic Theatre Project (MTP), develops theater programs for seniors living with Alzheimer’s and dementia. After four years of successful programs in Westchester County, he is launching the inaugural MTP workshops in Wyoming County in conjunction with the Office of the Aging, and Alzheimer’s Caregiver Partnership of WNY.

Bradford’s project, Voices UnCaged, brings theater to inmates in New York and Arkansas. For the second year, he will bring this program to Groveland Correctional Facility in Livingston County. The one-week theater outreach program, with teaching artists from Shake on the Lake, will culminate in an original performance by the students for an audience of their fellow inmates and prison administrators.

The company returned for its residency in Silver Lake in mid-July. In addition to performing, the company has a full schedule of K-12 educational programming (Perry, Lyndonville, Belmont and Niagara Falls), community outreach, and performances throughout Western New York.

“We’re thrilled that Shake on the Lake is welcomed in so many communities throughout Western New York,” said Managing Director Pilar McKay. “This year we also joined the Theatre Alliance of Buffalo to strengthen our ties to the regional theater community and to represent professional theatre in rural areas.”

Performances in Wyoming County are scheduled as follows:

    • Attica: July 31 at the Attica Historical Society, Main Street. Performance is free;

    • Arcade: Aug. 1 at the Village of Arcade Park (sledding hill), Main Street, rain location at the Hope Lutheran Church, Main Street. Performance is free; and

    • Silver Lake: Aug. 3, 4 and 5 at the Public Beach, with a rain location at Epworth Hall, Silver Lake. Cost is $10 per person or $35 for five people.

All performances begin at 6:30 p.m.

Shake on the Lake partners with organizations in many of the tour venues including Lyndonville Area Foundation, Lyndonville; Niagara Falls Air Force Base, Niagara Falls; Springville Center for the Arts, Springville; Ellicottville Chamber of Commerce, Ellicottville; Western Monroe Historical Society, Brockport; GO ART!, Batavia; Orleans County Tourism, Point Breeze; Arts Council for Wyoming County (Wyoming County shows), Perry; Wyoming County Tourism (Wyoming County shows), Warsaw; and Dansville Rotary, Dansville.

Shake on the Lake is a live theater festival and is the first live outdoor theater festival in Wyoming County. The mission of the festival is to entertain, engage and enrich those in the community by creating professional theater productions in a natural, outdoor setting.

This program is supported by the NYSCA-A.R.T./New York Creative Opportunity Fund (a statewide Theatre Regrant Program), the Lyndonville Area Foundation, the Conable Family Foundation, and the Austin Community Foundation.

For more information on Shake on the Lake, including updates on events and fundraising, volunteer, and sponsorship opportunities visit www.shakeonthelake.org or email shakeonthelake@gmail.com.

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