Arcade

Wednesday, June 28, 2017 at 7:39 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Arcade.
Event Date and Time: 
July 2, 2017 -
12:00pm to 3:00pm

July 2 from noon to 3 p.m. the 4th annual car show will be held at the Arcade Church of God, 7893 Countyline Road, Arcade.

For more information call (585) 493-2495.

Wednesday, June 28, 2017 at 7:36 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, education, Arcade, Warsaw.

Four local students named to the dean’s list at Buffalo State College, Buffalo. Students who have completed at least 12 credit hours and who have a grade point average of 3.5 or higher qualify for the list. 

Students include:

    • Sabina Mogavero and Rory Butts, both of Arcade; and

    • Alexis Burger and Kendra Galligan, both of Warsaw.

Buffalo State offers more than 160 undergraduate programs, including business administration, education, forensic chemistry, psychology, and television and film arts. The college also offers more than 60 graduate programs.

Friday, June 23, 2017 at 12:55 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, education, Arcade.

Stephanie Hanson, of Arcade, presented original research at the Student Research and Creativity Conference recently held at Buffalo State College, Buffalo.

The conference provides students with the opportunity to explore their own academic interests through research and creative activities, and to share their findings with their peers, professors, and the larger campus community. By conducting their own research under the guidance of a faculty mentor, students deepen their understanding while they create and share new knowledge, conference officials say.

Buffalo State, part of the State University of New York, offers degrees in the arts, education, professional studies, and science. The college offers more than 160 undergraduate programs, including business administration, education, forensic chemistry, psychology, and television and film arts. Buffalo State also offers more than 60 graduate programs.

Friday, June 23, 2017 at 12:46 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, government, Arcade.

Maj. Gen. Anthony P. German, the Adjutant General, announced the recent reenlistment and promotion of members of the State National Guard in recognition of their continuing commitment to serve community, state and nation as part of the Army National Guard.

Spc. Darren Haudricourt has reenlisted to continue service with the 105th Military Police Company and Spc. Dylan Haynes has reenlisted to continue service with the 152nd Engineer Support Company. Both men are from Arcade.

Ian George, of Varysburg, and assigned to the 105th Military Police Company received a promotion to the rank of Specialist.

Calley Leitten, of Warsaw, and assigned to the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 27th Brigade Special Troops Battalion received a promotion to the rank of Sergeant.

Army National Guard promotions are based on overall performance, attitude, leadership ability, and development potential.

"New Yorkers count on our Citizen Soldiers to be ready and be there when disaster strikes," German said. "And our nation counts on our Soldiers when duty calls for overseas service. I congratulate our members for choosing to stay in service and striking that balance between military duties, education or employment commitments and family obligations.

"Every one of the men and women serving in our 16,000 strong Army and Air National Guard plays an important role and these Soldiers who continue to reenlist provide experience and continuity for whatever challenges lay ahead for our New York National Guard family."

For more information about the New York Army National Guard, visit www.dmna.ny.gov orwww.1800goguard.com.

The New York National Guard (New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs) is the state's executive agency responsible to the governor for managing New York's Military Forces, which consists of nearly 20,000 members of the New York Army National Guard, the New York Air National Guard, the New York Naval Militia and the New York Guard.

Thursday, June 22, 2017 at 3:04 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, Warsaw, Arcade, Castile, Perry.

Press release

Demonstrating its dedication to its agricultural customers, Tompkins Insurance Agencies completed a rigorous educational training program to earn distinction as a Nationwide On Your Side Farm Certified Agency.

“For more than a century, Tompkins Insurance Agencies has been committed to providing unrivaled customer service to those who have trusted us with their insurance needs, including local farms and businesses,” said Tompkins Insurance Agencies President and CEO David Boyce. “The Farm Certified program from Nationwide is a perfect fit with our commitment to serve as a long-term partner that provides the highest level of service to our customers.”

Nationwide has more than 100 years of service and the company’s commitment to agribusiness can be traced back to 1909. Farm Certified agents are trained experts in the field, helping customers take proactive steps to protect their farm or ranch. To become certified, agents complete a series of comprehensive training classes covering the specifics of farming operations, commonly found risks and associated coverages. Agents recertify every three years, keeping current with changes in agriculture and trends in farming and ranching.

Tompkins Insurance Agencies works with large and small businesses across New York State and Pennsylvania and serve industries including agriculture, municipalities, not-for-profits, fire departments, schools, technology, construction, wineries, manufacturing, hospitals, dealerships, hospitality, and more.

Tompkins Insurance Agencies operates 17 offices in Western New York, six offices in central New York and six offices in southeast Pennsylvania. A part of Tompkins Financial Corporation, (trading as TMP on the NYSE - MKT), the agency is affiliated with Tompkins Bank of Castile, Tompkins Trust Company, Tompkins VIST Bank, Tompkins Mahopac Bank and Tompkins Financial Advisors.

It is an independent insurance agency offering personal and business insurance and employee benefits services through more than 50 of the nation’s leading insurance carriers. Tompkins Insurance ranks #2 on the Rochester Business Journal’s 2017 list of top Commercial Insurance firms.

Further information is available at www.tompkinsins.com

Thursday, June 22, 2017 at 2:29 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, arts, Perry, Warsaw, Arcade, Silver Lake.

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Hailed by those in the arts community as an international phenomenon, Make Music Day made its rounds throughout Wyoming County yesterday with a stop at Yummies in Warsaw. Customers or passersby were free to stop by and learn a few hand-drumming techniques in a drum circle led by the Arts Council of Wyoming County (ACWC) Executive Director Jackie Hoyt. 

Celebrating music on the longest day of the year – June 21 – the event paired volunteer venues and musicians of all levels to play and make music. 

Events were not only held around the county – Perry, Warsaw, Arcade and Silver Lake –  but in Buffalo, Washington, D.C., Vermont, Chicago, and the United Kingdom as well.

Wyoming County's event was hosted by the ACWC.

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Monday, June 19, 2017 at 5:53 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Arcade, Castile, Warsaw, Attica, Eagle.

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun June 15.

Cheleena Green, who committed a crime in Arcade, was sentenced to one year definite jail time and restitution of $1,170.39. Additionally, a stay-away order of protection was issued. She was convicted of assault in the second degree, a Class D felony. A determinate/definite sentence is a jail or prison sentence that has a defined length and can't be changed by a parole board or other agency.

Mason Maha, who committed a crime in Castile, was sentenced to six months in jail, five years probation, and $525 restitution.

John Sprague, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to failure to register as a sex offender, a Class E felony, and forcible touching, a Class A misdemeanor. Sentencing is scheduled Aug. 3. Bail remained at $5,000 cash or $10,000 bond. 

James Smith, an inmate in a State Correctional Facility, was sentenced to nine months interim probation on the conviction of promoting prison contraband in the first degree. The case has been adjourned to March 8.

The following was in court June 16.

Robin Jones, who committed a crime in Attica, was sentenced to five years probation, and surcharges and fees on the conviction of promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony. 

The following were in court June 19.

Marie Giambra, who is accused of a crime in Eagle, had her case adjourned to June 26 for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Michael Williams Jr., who committed a crime in Wyoming County, admitted to a violation of probation. He was resentenced to four weekends in jail, one-year conditional discharge and is required to have an ignition interlock device, and probation was revoked. 

The following are from State Correctional Facilities.

Rance Dreher pled guilty to promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled Aug. 16.

Anthony Placido was granted by the Court to have his count severed from his co-defendants’ cases. His case is adjourned to July 19.

Devante Spencer had his case adjourned to July 12.

Keith Tyson pled guilty to attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled Sept. 20.

Friday, June 9, 2017 at 3:23 pm

Public Health Column from the Wyoming County Health Department:

Do you know that mammals, including humans, can contract rabies? Bats, raccoons, foxes and skunks are assumed to be infected with this deadly virus and must be avoided. In any case with animals, it is better to love your own and leave others alone!

What is rabies? How is it transmitted? What are Signs & Symptoms?

Rabies is a virus that attacks the nervous system of mammals, ultimately causing disease in the brain and death. There are more than 4,000 different species of mammals, all of which are vertebrates (they have a backbone or spine), are endothermic (“warm-blooded”), have hair on their bodies, and produce milk to feed their babies.

Transmission of the rabies virus usually begins when the saliva of an infected host is passed to an uninfected mammal. The most common way rabies is transmitted is through the bite and virus-containing saliva of an infected host. Other routes include contamination of mucous membranes (i.e., eyes, nose, mouth), aerosol transmission, and organ transplantations.

The first symptoms of rabies may be very similar to those of the flu including general weakness or discomfort, fever or headache. These symptoms may last for days. There may also be discomfort or a prickling or itching sensation at the bite site, progressing within days to symptoms of cerebral (brain) dysfunction, anxiety, confusion, agitation.

As the disease progresses, the person may experience delirium, abnormal behavior, hallucinations and insomnia. Common signs of rabies in animals are; nocturnal (night) animals active during daylight, foaming of the mouth, overly aggressive, or uncoordinated. The acute period of disease typically ends after 2 to 10 days.  Once clinical signs of rabies appear, the disease is nearly always fatal, and treatment is typically supportive.

What to do if potentially exposed to rabies?

“If you are bitten, or if infectious material (such as saliva) from a wild or stray animal gets into your eyes, nose, mouth, or a cut, wash the area with soap/water and call your doctor or local County Health Department immediately. Please note that bats have very tiny, razor-sharp teeth so you may not feel or see a bite mark,” said Sarah Balduf, director of Environmental Health for Genesee & Orleans Counties.

IT IS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT to safely capture the suspect animal if it has or may have been in contact with people, pets or livestock so it can be tested for rabies. Capturing the suspect animal for testing is important because unnecessary medical treatment to people and confinement of pets or livestock may be avoidable.

“To diagnosis the rabies virus in animals testing the tissue of the brain is needed. Keep this in mind when capturing the animal because damage to the head/brain can cause it to be untestable. If treatment is recommended, it consists of a series of four shots, over a period of 14 days. An additional fifth dose of rabies vaccine is given on day 28 to immunocompromised patients (less capable of battling infections),” Balduf said.

*A link to a video on how to safely capture a bat is located below.

How do you to prevent rabies? 

Rabies is 100-percent preventable! Here are some ways to protect your families and animals.

·      Don't feed, touch or adopt wild animals, stray dogs or cats, including the babies.

·      Be sure your pet dogs, cats and ferrets as well as horses and valuable livestock animals are up-to-date on their rabies vaccinations. Vaccination protects pets if they are exposed to rabid animals. Pets too young to be vaccinated (under 3 months old) should be kept indoors and allowed outside only under direct observation.  Keep family pets indoors at night. Do not leave them outside unattended or let them roam free.

·      Do not attract wild animals to your home or yard. Keep your property free of stored bird seed or other foods that may attract wild animals. Feed pets indoors.  Tightly cap or put away garbage cans. Board up any openings to your attic, basement, porch or garage. Cap your chimney with screens. Bats can get in spaces as small as the width of a pencil.

·      If nuisance wild animals are living in parts of your home, consult with a nuisance wildlife control expert about having them removed. You can find wildlife control experts, who work on a fee-for-service basis, in your telephone directory under pest control.

·      Teach children not to touch any animal they do not know and to tell an adult immediately if they are bitten by any animal.

·      If a wild animal is on your property, let it wander away. Bring children and pets indoors and alert neighbors who are outside. You may contact a nuisance wildlife control expert who will remove the animal for a fee.

Upcoming Dog, Cat and Ferret Anti-Rabies Vaccination Clinics:

Clinics are free to county residents -- charges may apply for out of county residents.

Donations are appreciated -- for complete details visit the county health department’s website.

Wyoming County Clinics are held on the following dates and times:

*Registrations are not accepted the last 15 minutes.

  • Thursday, June 15th from 6 – 8 p.m., Arcade Town Highway Department, 7340 Route 98
  • Wednesday, July 19th from 6 – 8 p.m., Attica Town Highway Department, 700 Route 98
  • Saturday, Oct. 14th from 9 – 11:30 a.m, Wyoming County Highway Department, 4328 Route 19, Rock Glen

For more information on rabies, how to catch a bat safely, and much more visit, https://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/communicable/zoonoses/rabies/

Thursday, June 8, 2017 at 12:16 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, Warsaw, Perry, Arcade, Castile.

Press release

Tompkins Insurance Agencies recently was appointed to The Hanover Insurance Group’s President’s Club, an elite group of independent insurance agencies from across the country. 

Tompkins Insurance Agencies was one of only 125 independent agencies recognized with this distinction across the country.The Hanover partners with a select group of 2,200 independent agents nationwide. Agencies named to the company’s President’s Club are recognized for delivering outstanding value to their customers through insurance expertise and responsive service.

“For more than a century, Tompkins Insurance Agencies has been committed to providing unrivaled customer service to those who have trusted us with their insurance needs,” said Tompkins Insurance Agencies President & CEO David Boyce. “We’re proud to be named to the President’s Club, which is a recognition of the value we place on providing specialized insurance strategies to help the families and businesses in the communities we serve.”

The agency was formally recognized for its inclusion in the company’s President’s Club at a national business conference in Laguna Beach, Calif.

“The team at Tompkins Insurance Agencies truly understands the needs of its customers and delivers a top-of-the-line customer experience, providing expert insurance counsel and high-quality service,” said Hanover Agency Markets President John C. Roche. “We’re proud to partner with Tompkins Insurance Agencies and appreciate its commitment to going above and beyond to serve its customers.”

Wednesday, May 31, 2017 at 6:56 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, Attica, Arcade, Castile, North Java.

Nazareth College graduate students earned their degrees May 14 at the 90th Annual Commencement ceremony at the Blue Cross Arena, Rochester.

    • Morgan Monahan earned a master's degree in occupational therapy and Mary White earned a doctoral degree in physical therapy. Both are residents of Arcade; and

    • Mcleana Schwab, of North Java, earned a doctoral degree in physical therapy.

Nazareth students named to the spring 2017 dean's list include: 

    • John Beyer, of Arcade, is majoring in psychology;

    • Katriel DeGolyer is majoring in English Lit Conc, inclusive education and Alexandra Scharet is majoring in social work. Both are residents of Castile; and 

    • McKenzie McLaughlin, of Attica, is majoring in psychology.

Nazareth College's offers 60 majors, including education, health and human services, management, the fine arts, music, theater, math and science, foreign languages, and the liberal arts. The coeducational college supports 2,000 undergrads and 800 graduate students. Nazareth is recognized nationally for its Fulbright global student scholars and commitment to civic engagement.

Tuesday, May 30, 2017 at 3:23 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Arcade, Perry, Java.

David A. McClurg, 49, of Perry, was charged May 27 with driving while intoxicated, driving with a BAC of .08 percent or higher, and failure to keep right. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say McClurg was stopped after he was seen making an unsafe turn into the oncoming lane, swerving off the right hand side of the road and then swerving back over the centerline on Suckerbrook Road. During the stop, he was given roadside sobriety testing, which he allegedly failed. He is due in the Town of Perry Court June 21.

Michael Goss, 51, of Arcade, was charged May 28 with felony driving while intoxicated and unlawful possession of marijuana. Goss was stopped on Route 39, Sardinia, for allegedly speeding. New York State Troopers say an odor of alcohol was detected during the stop and Goss was asked to perform sobriety tests. He allegedly failed the tests and was arrested for DWI. Additionally, he is accused of possessing a small quantity of marijuana. He was taken to the trooper barracks in Holland where his breath sample allegedly showed a BAC of .11 percent. He is due June 13 in the Town of Sardinia Court. 

Stephen Trottier, 41, of Ontario, Canada, was charged May 27 with failure to yield the right of way at a stop sign, following a two-car accident on Route 78 and Youngers Road, Java. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say Trottier was traveling south on Youngers Road when he collided with a vehicle westbound on Route 78. There were three passengers that sustained non-life-threatening injuries. They were taken to ECMC and Women's & Children’s Hospital, both in Buffalo, via North Java, Bliss, and Medic 80 ambulances. Trottier is due in Java Town Court in July. Barbers Towing assisted in removing the vehicles from the scene.

Amanda M. Comstock, 27, of Perry, was charged May 19 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the third degree, unlicensed operator and speeding. She is due in Geneseo Village Court at a later date.

A 17-year-old Perry teen was charged May 28 with unlawful possession of marijuana following a complaint to the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office. The teen is accused of possessing a small quantity of marijuana. She is due in Batavia Town Court on June 26.

Tuesday, May 30, 2017 at 12:31 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, railroad, Arcade, Attica.

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There are many what ifs that could have changed the course of history for the Arcade & Attica Railroad. However, one of those what ifs can be considered the heart of the railroad – the community surrounding the A&A.

What if the community surrounding the railroad -- then called the Buffalo, Attica & Arcade -- didn’t see the rail as a link to nearby cities?

During the 1800s, the farmers of Western New York saw the perfect opportunity for a link to the big cities when railroads began stretching across the country.

In 1880, the line officially opened when the Pennsylvania Railroad bought up all the small, incomplete railroads and linked them together, thus forming the Buffalo, Attica & Arcade Railroad.

However, in 1917, when the line was in danger of shutting down, the businessmen surrounding it, along with nearby farmers, merchants and general townsfolk, bought stock and formed the Arcade & Attica Railroad Corporation, thus saving the railroad. 

“The railroad industry’s origins date back the 18- and 1900s,” said Arcade Town Historian Jeff Mason. “So it’s not really out of the ordinary that a railroad would be 100 years old. But, not many have had the same name or corporate structure for 100 years… the stocks of the Arcade & Attica have had the same name for 100 years.”

For many, the face of the A&A Railroad is the passenger steam excursion to the Chaffee Road depot (Curriers Corners). However, in its early years, the train connected businesses and farmers in rural Western New York to nearby cities as a freight line.

“Everything is built around the railroad in this town (Arcade),” said longtime A&A employee Pat Connors. “Lots of industry that was developed here because of the railroad is still here today.”

Although the A&A doesn’t haul as much freight as it once did, the weekend and special event rides keep the train rolling.

“The railroad survived because of the people who use it, enjoy it, and who work here,” Connors said. “It is the people…we do it because we love it and want you all to enjoy it.”

The A&A Railroad is the second-oldest tourism asset in Wyoming County – Letchworth State Park is number one – says Wyoming County Chamber President Scott Gardner. Throughout the train’s history, 1.5 million people have come to Arcade because of the railroad.

Not only did the A&A celebrate its 100th anniversary with a ribbon cutting and special train excursion Saturday, for the first time in its history the steam engine hauled passengers running in reverse to the Chaffee Road depot.

In addition to celebrating its 100 years in business, the A&A was also named Tourism Business of the Year by the Chamber & Tourism Department at a recent awards dinner. 

See related: Recognizing businesses for their contributions to Wyoming County

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Thursday, May 25, 2017 at 5:01 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, announcements, Business, Warsaw, Attica, Perry, Arcade.

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Each year, the Wyoming County Chamber & Tourism recognizes three businesses for their contributions to the economic vitality and quality of life in the county.

The three businesses celebrated at a recent Chamber Awards Dinner held at The Lodge at Hidden Valley Animal Adventure, Varysburg. They include: Harding’s Attica Furniture and Flooring, Small Business of the Year; Complete Payroll, Large Business of the Year; and Arcade & Attica Railroad – Chris Lester, Tourism Business of the Year.

Other criteria for the award include: capital investments, business expansions, job growth and retention, community involvement, and contributions that strengthen its business sector here in the county.

Harding’s Attica Furniture and Flooring

Harding’s dates back three generations when Gordon “Gub” Harding opened the business in 1973. Gub and his wife, Sally, have since passed the family business on to their children and grandson –Ted, Mike, Debbie and Luke.

“The Harding family is an institution in the Attica area and it’s because of their strong roots and the quality business they run,” said Chamber President Scott Gardner. “They are family oriented because they are family. You can see it in how they work together and relate to their customers. They’re friendly and inviting and always willing to go the extra mile for almost anyone they meet.”

But the heart of the business doesn’t just end at the family name, they contribute much of their success to their employees.

Sam McKenzie’s tenure with the company spans 15 years and Amy Cramer’s hit the decade mark. Other employees include Mike Stengel, James Manarite, and Brendon Burg.

In 2003 they added a new flooring warehouse to the business and in 2007 the store entrance was updated. 

Along with remodeling the front showroom in 2014 and the Flexsteel showroom in 2015, the company renovated the flooring warehouse, and remodeled again in 2016.

Starting at some point late this, early next year, a new furniture warehouse is expected to be constructed.

“You know a small business is good, when people drive in from other counties just to shop with them. That’s absolutely true of Harding’s.

“Earlier in the year I ran into one of their customers who said after the great experience, they had they wouldn’t go anywhere else. That in and of itself is the true mark of success.”

Complete Payroll

“Since its inception in 1992, Complete Payroll has processed millions of checks, billions in tax payments and earned a following of thousands of loyal clients. Today they are regarded as one of the top payroll processing firms in the United States. At the end of 2016, Complete Payroll had 1,700 clients and 50-plus employees working across their several locations. In 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2017 Complete Payroll was nominated by Buffalo Business First as one of Western New York’s best places to work.”

The company, located in Perry, was founded in 1992 by Rick Fish Sr., Jim Genduso and John LaFever. 

Early on, Fish identified a need for an accurate, affordable, customer-driven payroll company that could compete with the payroll giants in the United States.

In 2008, Fish’s son, Rick, took the reins of the company. In early 2012, his other son, Austin, took over the position of chief operating officer. Both men have worked in various positions throughout the company prior to their current positions.

“While Complete Payroll is still owned and managed by two generations of the Fish family, they have expanded to welcome an amazing array of talent to their strategy group of well-rounded and well-versed professionals specializing in payroll and human capital management. They include Kevin F. Herbek, director of Finance; and directors include Jason M. Pearl, director of Sales and Marketing; and Richard White, director of Client Services. They are also known as the Fab Five.”

In 2001 Complete Payroll underwent a major software upgrade. By 2004 the conversion was completed.

Since 2012, the company has opened offices in Henrietta, Amherst, and a second location in Perry on Lake Street.

This year marks the 25-year anniversary of Complete Payroll. As a way to celebrate the milestone, and give back to the Perry community, the company recently planted 25 trees in and around the Village.

Arcade & Attica Railroad

Not only was the railroad named Tourism Business of the Year, it is also celebrating its 100th anniversary this year.

Small, incomplete railroads were scattered across the countryside throughout Western New York during the 1800s. With railroads stretching across the country, Western New York farmers saw a link to the cities. 

The Buffalo, Attica & Arcade Railroad was formed when the Pennsylvania Railroad bought the incomplete railroads and linked them together. This allowed the rail to connect Attica, through Arcade, to the Pennsylvania state line then onto Pittsburgh.

“The rails passengers ride today were first spiked down in 1881 and standardized in 1895 to connect with the Pennsylvania Railroad.”

When the railroad was in danger of shutting down in 1917, businesses along the rail sold stock to farmers, merchants and others and raised $79,000 and formed the Arcade & Attica Railroad Corporation.

While the railroad went through many changes throughout its 100 years, it still runs regular freight service and passenger excursions from Arcade to its Curriers Road depot.

The Arcade & Attica Railroad will be holding a ribbon cutting and other special events on Saturday beginning at 10 a.m.. For more information visit gowyoming.com.

For information about the Chamber or Tourism departments visit wycochamber.org/

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Thursday, May 18, 2017 at 6:31 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, education, crime, Warsaw, Attica, Arcade, Perry, Castile.

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Local youths traversed the county placing neon green warning stickers on multi-packs of alcoholic beverages at grocery and convenience stores throughout the county. Project Sticker Shock serves as a reminder to adults that providing alcohol to minors is illegal. 

Partners for Prevention (P4P), a group of youth and adults working together to address issues surrounding alcohol and other drug use in Wyoming County, participate in the annual event to raise awareness about underage drinking. 

With the upcoming graduations, P4P officials reminds residents that alcohol-related deaths or injuries are all too often associated with special events or holiday seasons. The stickers remind consumers that it is illegal for any person 21 years old or older to purchase or provide alcohol to minors, and offenses are punishable with fines up to $1,000 or one year in jail.

Participating stores include: 

    • Tops Markets in Attica, Warsaw and Arcade;

    • Rite Aid and BenGos Express Mart, Attica;

    • Brass’ Shurfine, Arcade;

    • Arrow Mart, Warsaw;

    • Perry Market Place, Rite Aid, Arrow Mart, Perry; and 

    • Carney’s Market and Arrow Mart, Castile.

For more information about P4P visit http://www.wycop4p.com/

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Thursday, May 18, 2017 at 1:20 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Silver Springs, Bliss, Arcade.

Brittany M. Copeland, 22, of Silver Springs, was charged May 14 with failure to keep right, driving while intoxicated, DWI with a BAC of .08 percent or more, and aggravated DWI – .18 percent BAC or higher. Copeland was stopped on Sowerby Road, Perry, for allegedly failing to keep right. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say further investigation showed her to be driving while intoxicated. Subsequently, she was arrested and taken to the Perry Police Department for a breath test. She is due in the Town of Perry Court at a later date. 

Adam K. Barber, 38, of Bliss, was charged May 5 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the second degree and speeding. He is due in Avon Town Court at a later date.

Heather E. Gearman, 31, of Arcade, was charged May 15 with petit larceny. Gearman is accused of stealing merchandise from Dollar General in Pembroke. She is due in the Town of Pembroke Court at a later date.

Wednesday, May 17, 2017 at 10:52 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, announcements, fire, Warsaw, Arcade, Castile.

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Firefighters and emergency responders with the Warsaw, Castile and Arcade fire departments recently received equipment to save a pet’s life.

Amy Pusater, of Project Breathe of NY, stopped by the Warsaw Fire Department earlier today to present officials with two sets of pet oxygen mask kits. The kits includes small-, medium- and large-size masks.

The donation is part of Invisible Fence Brand’s commitment to saving the lives of pets, Pusater says. The company created the pet oxygen mask donation program to provide fire departments and other first responders across the United States and Canada the equipment to save the lives of pets. Fire departments are eligible to receive one kit per station.

According to the Invisible Fence Brand website: Although the U.S. Fire Administration does not keep an official statistic, industry sources estimate 40,000 to 150,000 pets die each year in fires. Most succumb to smoke inhalation.

Officials say the program has saved an estimated 10,000 pets from fires and smoke inhalation.

“We’re excited to be able to add these masks to our organization,” said Warsaw Fire Chief Joe Cummins. “We hope that we don’t have to use them, but it’s a great tool to have if needed.

"To many people, myself included, their pet is their four-legged child. If we can help save them, it’s like saving part of the family. We would like to thank Invisible Fence and its Project Breathe Program for the donated masks.”

Fire departments can request a mask kit by clicking here.

Monday, May 8, 2017 at 5:54 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Warsaw, Genesee Falls, Perry, Arcade, Portageville.

Corrie L. Mann, 36, of Portageville, was charged May 5 with not having transparent windows, driving while intoxicated, driving while ability impaired by a drug, and driving while ability impaired by a combination of drugs and alcohol, all as felonies. Mann was stopped on Route 436, Genesee Falls, for a window tint violation. Following a roadside investigation, she was arrested for driving while intoxicated. She was taken to the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office where she supplied a breath sample which allegedly showed a BAC that did not match the observed impairment. She was then evaluated by a certified drug recognition expert who determined she was impaired by stimulants and alcohol. Due to a prior DWI conviction in 2012, her arrest became a felony. She was released on her own recognizance and is due in the Town of Genesee Falls Court at a later date.

Ryan Fisher, 28, Perry, was charged May 3 with driving while impaired by drugs and unregistered motor vehicle. Fisher was stopped on North Main Street, Warsaw, for an alleged expired registration. During the stop, he was given roadside field sobriety testing, which he subsequently failed, Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say. Additionally, was then evaluated by a drug recognition expert who determined him to be impaired by a stimulant. He is due in the Village of Warsaw Court May 22. New York State Police assisted with the roadside investigation.

Kevin Haynes, 47, of Arcade, was charged May 6 with criminal contempt in the first degree and an aggravated family offense in the Village of Arcade Court. Haynes was arrested following an investigation of a violation of an order of protection. Deputies say Haynes came into contact with a subject where there was an active stay away order of protection. Additionally, it was also found that he had been charged and convicted of criminal contempt within the last five years. He was put in Wyoming County Jail without bail. He is due in the Village of Arcade Court at 8 a.m. June 15.

Friday, April 28, 2017 at 6:15 pm

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun April 27.

Thomas McCabe III, who is accused of a crime in Bennington, pled not guilty to criminal possession of a controlled substance in the second degree, a Class A-II felony. Motions are scheduled June 22. Bail was set at $100,000 cash, bond or property.

Leah McCabe, who is accused of a crime in Bennington, pled not guilty to criminal possession of a controlled substance in the second degree, a Class A-II felony. Motions are scheduled June 22. Bail was set at $25,000 cash or $50,000 bond.

Lorenzo Eaton, who committed a crime in Arcade, was sentenced to five years probation on the conviction of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony. Restitution of $200 has also been paid.

Katrina Chandler, who committed a crime in Attica, pled guilty to forgery in the second degree, a Class D felony, and petit larceny. She was sentenced to one year interim probation. Restitution of $600 has been paid.

Serena Silvernail waived indictment on forgery in the second degree, a Class D felony, and grand larceny in the fourth degree, a Class E felony. Silvernail pled guilty to the lesser charge of petit larceny. She was sentenced at the discretion of the Court to a one-year conditional discharge. Restitution of $1,700 has been paid. An order of protection was issued.

Michael Marrale, who committed a crime in Attica, pled guilty to reckless endangerment in the first degree, a Class D felony, and driving while intoxicated, a Class E felony. An order of protection was issued and the case was adjourned to July 20 for sentencing.

Grayson Stock, who committed a crime in Attica, was sentenced to three years probation, a $1,000 fine, $20 in restitution, and 75 hours in community service. He was convicted of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree, a Class A misdemeanor.

John Townley, who committed a crime in Eagle, was sentenced to one year interim probation on the conviction of criminal mischief in the third degree, a Class E felony.

Clifford Murch, who is accused of a crime in Perry, had his case adjourned to Monday.

Sarah Ingalls, who is accused of a crime in Perry, had her case adjourned for Treatment Court. Formerly called Drug Court, Treatment Court not only handles those who have a drug problem, but also those with an alcohol or mental health problem. Other assistance involves aiding with health insurance issues – oftentimes a hurdle to gaining access to treatment – for outpatient or inpatient services.

Carl Vander, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to six months in jail, five years probation, $147.31 in restitution, and fees and surcharges. He was convicted of attempted assault in the second degree and attempted burglary in the third degree, both are Class E felonies. 

Chad Main, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to driving while intoxicated, a Class E felony. Sentencing is scheduled July 20.

Tyler Tones, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to failure to register as a sex offender, a Class E felony. Sentencing is scheduled June 22. He is held in Wyoming County Jail without bail.

Ryan McDanel, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to attempted criminal possession of a weapon in the third degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled July 20.

Jeffrey Snyder II, who committed a crime in Wethersfield, pled guilty to assault in the second degree, a Class D felony. He was sentenced to one year interim probation. An order of protection was left in place. Final sentencing is April 12.

Alex Drake, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, admitted to a violation of probation. Sentencing is scheduled June 22. He is held without bail in Wyoming County Jail.

Brandon McCoy, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, admitted to a violation of probation and was released back to probation. Final sentencing is Aug. 3.

The following are from State Correctional Facilities in Attica and were in Court before Mohun April 26 and 27. 

Jerry Gillard pled guilty to attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled May 17.

Jamal Wilson pled guilty to attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled June 21. Wilson waived appearance at sentencing.

James Smith had his case adjourned to May 3. He continues to be held without bail.

Billyray Staton pled guilty to attempted criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled June 21.

Jonathan Smith pled guilty to attempted criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled June 21.

Andrew Mott had his case adjourned to May 17.

Lindell Cox had his case adjourned to June 21 for an appearance. He is scheduled for trial July 7.

Benedict Agnostini had his case adjourned to June 21.

Patrick Hill was in court for a Huntley Hearing. The decision has been reserved. The case has been adjourned to May 17.  A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant. After the hearing of a trial or the argument of a motion a judge might not immediately deliver a decision, but instead take time to review evidence and the law and deliver a decision at a later time, usually in a written form, thus reserve decision.

Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 4:00 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, Arcade, accident.

An ATV accident at Mockingbird Campgrounds, Genesee Road, Arcade, claimed the life of 43-year-old Jason Krull, of Buffalo.

Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say Krull had been pinned under the ATV for an unknown amount of time before he was discovered by a friend.

Crews from Arcade Ambulance and Medic 81 were the first to arrive on the scene and began performing CPR. After nearly 30 minutes, ambulance personnel were able to obtain a pulse. 

Krull was then taken to Bertrand-Chaffee Hospital, Springville, where he was later flown to ECMC where he succumbed to his injuries late Monday evening.

Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at 11:45 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Perry, Warsaw, Covington, Gainesville, Arcade, Castile.
joshua_blaskovits_mug_shot.jpg
    Joshua Blaskovits

Joshua D. Blaskovits, 35, of Huntsville, Ala., was charged April 14 with no turn signal, failure to keep right, driving while ability impaired by a drug, and aggravated driving while intoxicated – child in the vehicle. Blaskovits was stopped on Route 20A, Perry, after allegedly failing to signal a turn and his inability to maintain his lane of travel. Additionally, deputies say a 15-year-old was in the vehicle at the time of the traffic stop. Subsequently, he was arrested for aggravated DWI under Leandra’s Law. Blaskovits was taken to the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Department and evaluated by a Drug Recognition Expert who determined him to be impaired by marijuana. He was put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $5,000 cash bail or $10,000 bond. He is due in the Town of Perry Court at a later date.

Gary J. Rupert, 46, of Arcade, was charged April 21 with two counts of criminal use of a benefit card and two counts of petit larceny following an investigation by the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office and the Department of Social Services. Rupert is accused of selling his SNAP (food stamps) card for cash although he did not actually have benefits available on the card at the time. He is due in Arcade Court June 15. 

Matthew Wendt, no age provided, of Warsaw, was arrested April 22 on a bench warrant issued by the Town of Warsaw Justice Court for failure to appear. Wendt was taken into custody at his home in the Village, after which he was arraigned and paid part of his fine. He was released on his own recognizance.

Kenneth J. Shearing Jr., 35, of Perry, was charged April 13 with felony tampering with physical evidence. He was put in Livingston County Jail in lieu of $1,500 cash bail. He is due in Lima Town Court at a later date.

Bryan M. Beach, 33, of Perry, was charged April 16 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle. He is due in Avon Town Court at a later date.

Anthoney P. Passamonte, 22, of Warsaw, was charged March 31 with inadequate taillight, driving while intoxicated, and refusal to submit to a breath test. Passamonte was stopped on Route 19A, Castile, for an alleged broken taillight. Following a roadside investigation and field sobriety testing, he was arrested for DWI. Additionally, he refused a breath test. Passamonte was arraigned in the Town of Castile Court where his license was suspended pending a refusal hearing. He was put in Wyoming County Jail on $500 cash bail and is due in the Town of Castile Court at a later date.

Zachary J. Lathigee, 23, of Silver Springs, was charged April 17 with inadequate stop lamps and two counts of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree. Lathigee was stopped on Route 19, Warsaw, for inadequate brake lights. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say, during the investigation two different controlled substances were found in his vehicle, neither of which were prescribed to Lathigee. He is due in the Town of Warsaw Court May 22.

Tammy J. Hill, 41, of Covington, was charged April 24 with speeding, driving while ability impaired by a drug, and driving while ability impaired by the combination of drugs. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say Hill was stopped for speeding on Route 246, Covington. Following an investigation, she was arrested for driving while ability impaired by drugs. She was taken to the Sheriff’s Office and evaluated by a Drug Recognition Expert, who determined Hill to be impaired by multiple categories of drugs and unable to drive safely. She is due in the Town of Covington Court at a later date.

Ervin W. Delude Sr., 45, of Gainesville, was charged April 17 with unlawful possession of marijuana following a traffic stop on Route 19A, Gainesville. Delude, a passenger in the vehicle at the time of the traffic stop, allegedly turned over a small quantity of marijuana after deputies say they smelled the drug coming from the vehicle. He is due in the Town of Genesee Falls Court May 24.

Terry W. Davis, 35, of Perry, was charged April 17 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the third degree, failure to keep right, and failure to change address. Davis was stopped on Simmons Road, Perry, after deputies say he failed to keep right. During the stop, he was allegedly found to have two active suspensions on his license. His vehicle was towed from the scene by Maher Brother’s Towing. He is due in the Town of Perry Court May 14.

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