Attica

Thursday, February 23, 2017 at 5:05 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, court, Perry, Warsaw, Attica, news.

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The following were in Wyoming County Court Feb. 22 before Judge Michael Mohun.

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    Charles Braun

Charles Braun, who committed a crime in Perry, was sentenced to 15 years in prison and five years post-release supervision, plus fees and surcharges. The sentence is to run concurrently with his Livingston County Sentence. He was convicted of attempted rape in the first degree, a Class C violent felony.

See related: Charles Braun pled guilty to attempted rape

The following are from State Correctional facilities in Attica. 

Bail is set for state inmate cases for two reasons:

    • In the event that the inmates current sentence is overturned on appeal or the inmates sentence is about to expire the bail will kick in on the new case and the inmate would be turned over to the Wyoming County Jail while the new case is pending; and

    • When bail is placed on an inmate it follows the inmate so when they are moved to different facilities it is one way for them to be found and also the state system knows there is another case still pending.

Rodney Webster pled guilty to conspiracy in the fourth degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled for April 12.

Javon Woods had his case adjourned to March 13.

Terrance Milton was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison. He was convicted of attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony. The sentence is to run consecutively to his current sentence. He is also responsible for all fees and surcharges incurred.

Abida McIntosh was sentenced to one-and-two-thirds to three-and-one-half years in prison, and fees and surcharges. He was convicted of attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony. The sentence is to run consecutively to his current term.

Andrew Mott pled not guilty to promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony, and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree, a Class A misdemeanor. The case has been adjourned to April 12. Bail was set at $5,000.

Pablo Sanes pled not guilty to promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony. Motions are scheduled for April 12. Bail was set at $5,000.

Darrell Carthon was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison on the conviction of attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony. He is also responsible for all fees and surcharges incurred. The sentence is to run consecutively to his current term.

Shaquor Smith pled not guilty to promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony. Motions are scheduled for April 12. Bail was set at $5,000.

Brian Atkins was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison on the conviction of attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. He is also responsible for all fees and surcharges incurred. The sentence is to run consecutively to his current sentence.

Benedict Agostini had his case adjourned to March 13.

Wesley Kirkland pled not guilty to promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony. The case has been adjourned to April 12. Bail was set at $5,000.

John Harris pled guilty to two counts of attempted assault in the second degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled April 12.

Ricky Morris pled guilty to attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled April 12.

Jayshawn Williams pled guilty to attempted assault in the second degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled April 12.

Lindell Cox had his case adjourned to March 15.

Diquan Wells was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison on the conviction of attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. He is also responsible for all fees and surcharges incurred. The sentence is to run consecutively to his current sentence.

Neil Allen was in court for motions. His case has been adjourned to March 13 for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Mohun Feb. 21.

Kenneth Fullen, who committed a crime in Perry, pled guilty to burglary in the second degree, a Class C felony. Sentencing is scheduled March 30. He is held without bail in the Wyoming County Jail.

Christian Manley, an inmate at a State Correctional facility in Attica, had his case adjourned to March 9.

Wednesday, February 22, 2017 at 2:47 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, Business, Warsaw, Attica, Arcade, Perry, Main Street.

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New York adopted the "click-through nexus" law in 2008. It requires certain out-of-state or online merchants to collect tax on sales of their own merchandise. That first-in-the-nation law is the template for statutes in nearly two dozen other states and survived court challenges, including the New York State Court of Appeals.

Within Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s executive budget is a proposal seeking to require “marketplace providers” to collect New York’s state and local sales taxes on merchandise shipped into the state from out-of-state sellers. This proposal applies the existing nexus law to a new and growing Internet sales platform.

“Online retailers put brick-and-mortar businesses on our Main streets at a competitive disadvantage,” said Wyoming County Chamber President Scott Gardner. “They (online retailers) may not be collecting the sales tax on merchandise, whereas a local merchant has to because they are located in New York.”

If the online business does not have a physical presence in the state, it can be more difficult for the state to enforce the collection of the sales tax from purchases made by New York consumers.

“It hurts people like our independent booksellers, small retailers, gift shops, clothing stores, etcetera,” Gardner said.

The budget proposal would require online marketplaces with more than $100 million in annual sales to collect and remit tax just as consignment shop owners and auction houses now do. Estimates show that improved enforcement of existing tax laws would result in some $275 million in fiscal year 2018-19.

Wyoming County Board of Supervisors Chairman Doug Berwanger was unavailable for comment.

Friday, February 17, 2017 at 5:11 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, crime, Perry, Attica, Warsaw.
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   John D. Carpenter

John D. Carpenter, 65, of Warsaw, was charged Feb. 15 with falsely reporting an incident in the third degree, and aggravated harassment in the second degree. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say Carpenter made multiple threatening and alarming phone calls to the Wyoming County 9-1-1 Center. He is accused of repeatedly calling 9-1-1 and reporting that people were going to die, among other alarming statements. Officials say, Carpenter told dispatchers at one point that he continued to call 9-1-1 because he was bored. When deputies responded to his home, he allegedly refused to come to the door. Subsequently, officers got a warrant for his arrest and took Carpenter, a convicted violent felon, into custody without incident. He was put in Wyoming County Jail on $5,000 cash bail or $10,000 bond. He is due in the Village of Warsaw Court March 6. Warsaw Police assisted deputies at the arrest scene.

Lisa A. Strong, 34, of Attica, was charged Feb. 16 with four counts of endangering the welfare of a child. Attica Police reports that while assisting the Wyoming County Child Protective Services in investigating possible child neglect, they found four children living in “unsanitary and deplorable conditions.” The children, with cooperation from the defendant, were removed from the home and placed into foster care, officials say. Strong was put in Wyoming County Jail on $2,500 cash bail or $5,000 bond. She is due at 10 a.m. in Attica Village Court March 13.

Raymond T. Frawley, 37, of Angelica, was arrested Feb. 16 on a warrant out of Wyoming County Family Court for failure to obey a Family Court support order. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies arrested Frawley on a tip from their Warrant Wednesday program on Facebook. The tip allegedly reported the location of the defendant, who was then arrested by Allegany County Sheriff’s deputies and turned over to the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office. He is in Wyoming County Jail on $1,000 bail.

James Becker, 25, of Perry, was charged with driving while intoxicated and DWI with a BAC more than .08 percent. Becker was charged after allegedly driving himself to the Perry Police Department to turn himself in on a bench warrant for failure to appear. Officers say, while at the station, Becker had glassy eyes and a strong odor of alcohol about him. He was placed through field sobriety testing, which he allegedly failed, and a breath test showed a BAC of .16 percent. He was arrested on the warrant and put in Wyoming County Jail on $500 cash bail. He is due in Perry Village Court at a later date.

Wednesday, February 15, 2017 at 5:02 pm

James Mages, 53, of Akron, was charged Feb. 13 with criminal trespass in the second degree and petit larceny. Mages is accused of entering a home on Nesbitt Road, Attica, and taking clothing from the residence. After being confronted by the homeowner, he left the house. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say they found Mages driving from the scene. Allegedly refusing to stop, Mages led officers to a Buffalo Road address in the Town of Orangeville, where he was arrested. Additionally, deputies say he was wearing the clothing he had taken from the Nesbitt Road home. Subsequently, Mages was also charged with obstructing governmental administration in the second degree and failure to comply with a police officer. He was put in Wyoming County jail on $5,000 bond. He is due in both Attica and Orangeville town courts at a later date. New York State Police and Warsaw Police assisted with the arrest.

Keith E. Legge, 44, of Perry, was charged Feb. 15 with harassment in the second degree. Perry Police say Legge is accused of threatening a neighbor at a South Main Street address. He is due in Perry Village Court March 14.

Scott Grisewood, no age provided, of Warsaw, was arrested on a warrant issued out of Perry Village Court. He was picked up on the warrant by Warsaw Police. Grisewood was released on his own recognizance to pretrial release.

Andrew Perdock, no age provided, of Perry, was arrested Feb. 14 on a warrant issued out of Perry Village Court. He was released on his own recognizance to pretrial release.

Nicole R. Fronczak, 27, of Silver Springs, was charged Feb. 11 with failure to keep right, driving while intoxicated, driving with a BAC of .08 percent or greater, and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree. Fronczak was stopped on Route 19A, Castile, after deputies say they saw her driving across the center yellow lines of the roadway. She was arrested following an investigation and allegedly failing roadside field sobriety testing. She was taken to the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office where a breath sample allegedly showed a BAC of .14 percent. She is due in the Town of Castile Court March 6.

Wednesday, February 15, 2017 at 3:31 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Attica.
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 Leonard E. Hahn IV

A 17-yer-old Le Roy teen has been charged with multiple counts of rape after one of the victims told school officials.

Leonard E. Hahn IV was charged Feb. 9 with two counts of rape in the first degree, a Class B felony, following a joint investigation between the Attica Police Department and the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office.

During the investigation, additional victims came forward resulting in the multiple charges and due to their ages, substantiated the charged to first degree.

Police officials say Hahn is suspected of raping one victim on two separate occasions in the Village of Attica, and a different victim in Genesee County. Both victims, known to Hahn, are younger than 11 years old.

“The Attica Police Department would like to thank the youth officers of the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office and special thanks to the staff of Justice for Children Advocacy Center,” said Attica Police Chief Dean Hendershott. “The interagency cooperation and commitment resulted in the best possible outcome for the child victim(s) and their non-offending caregivers. This commitment is shared by all law enforcement agencies in both counties, the District Attorney offices and the departments of Social Service/ Child Protective Services.”

Hahn is currently in Genesee County Jail in lieu of $25,000 cash bail or $50,000 bond. Additionally, bail was set in the Village Attica Court at $100,000 cash or $200,000 bond.

“Anyone having additional information or anyone having knowledge of possible additional victims, please contact your appropriate law enforcement agency.”

Attica Police can be reached at (585) 591-0881. The Genesee County Sheriff’s Office is (585) 345-3000.

Monday, February 13, 2017 at 2:07 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Attica, Perry, Orangeville.

William A. Shearin Jr., 57, of Philadelphia, Pa., was charged Feb. 12 with driving while ability impaired by drugs, driving while ability impaired by the combined influence of alcohol and drugs, consumption of alcohol in a motor vehicle, unlicensed operator of a motor vehicle, and speed over 55 mph. Shearin was stopped for allegedly speeding on Route 20A, Orangeville. During the stop, Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies smelled marijuana and alcohol coming from inside his vehicle. Through investigation it was learned that his Pennsylvania driver’s license was suspended, allegedly since 2004. Deputies say he failed standardized field sobriety testing and was then taken to the Sheriff’s Office for a drug influence evaluation. The drug recognition expert determined Shearin to be impaired by alcohol and cannabis. He was put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $500 cash bail or $2,000 bond. He is due in the Town of Orangeville Court March 15.

Wayne L. Pierce, 75, of Alexander, was charged with forcible touching. Pierce was arrested over the weekend for an incident that happened at Ben Go’s gas station, Main Street, Attica, in late November. He is accused of inappropriately grabbing a female employee. He was released on his own recognizance. He is due in Attica Village Court at 10 a.m. March 13.

Robert A. Steavens, 49, of Attica, was charged with two counts of scheme to defraud in the second degree. Attica Police say Steavens obtained cigarettes from both the 7-Eleven and Ben Go’s gas station, both in Attica, under false pretenses. He is due in Attica Village Court at 10 a.m. March 13.

Dakota O. Irvin, 25, of Attica, was charged Feb. 11 with criminal contempt in the first degree, unlawful imprisonment in the second degree, and endangering the welfare of a child. Attica Police responded to a domestic incident on Main Street in the village. The investigation showed Irvin violated a complete stay away order of protection issued by Genesee County Family Court. He was put in Wyoming County Jail on $5,000 cash bail or $10,000 bond. He is due in Attica Village Court at 10 a.m. March 13. The Attica Police were assisted by the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Department.

Heather Foote, 39, of Perry, was charged Feb. 13 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the third degree, and inadequate tail lamps. Foote was stopped on North Center Street in the Village of Perry. During the investigation it was allegedly found that her license was suspended for failure to answer a summons out of Monroe County. She is due in Perry Village Court at a later date.

Toupoc Allen, 22, of Warsaw, was charged Feb. 8 with driving while intoxicated, driving with a blood alcohol content above .08 percent, driving while impaired by drugs, driving while impaired by drugs and alcohol combined, and failure to use headlights after dark. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say Allen was seen driving on Main Street and East Buffalo Street without any headlights on. Additionally, his vehicle was said to have broken down in the driving lane on East Buffalo Street. During the investigation, he was given field sobriety tests, which he allegedly failed, and submitted a breath test which allegedly showed a BAC above .08 percent. Allen was also given a drug influence evaluation by a Wyoming County Drug Recognition Expert, who determined he was also impaired by drugs. He was put in Wyoming County Jail on $1,000 cash bail. He is due in court March 6. Warsaw Police Department assisted with the investigation.

Friday, February 10, 2017 at 4:05 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Warsaw, Attica, Wethersfield.

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The following was in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun Feb. 7.

Crystal Colon-Rosado, who committed a crime in Attica, pled guilty to promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony, and conspiracy in the fifth degree, a Class A misdemeanor. Additionally, she waived her right to appeal and is scheduled for sentencing May 18.

The following were in court before Mohun Feb. 9.

Jerod Trebain, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to five years in prison and five years post-release supervision each on the convictions of attempted burglary in the second degree and assault in the second degree; both are Class D felonies as a second felony offender. Additionally, he is required to pay $690 in restitution, and fees and surcharges. An order of protection was also issued. The sentences are to run concurrently.

Brandon McCoy, who is accused of a crime in Warsaw, had his case adjourned to April 6.

Jeffrey Snyder, who is accused of a crime in Wethersfield, pled to guilty to: assault in the second degree, a Class D felony; criminal obstruction of breathing or blood circulation; unlawful imprisonment in the second degree; and assault in the third degree. The case is adjourned to April 27.

Thursday, February 9, 2017 at 3:57 pm

The State University of New York (SUNY) at Geneseo has announced its dean's list for the fall 2016 semester. To be on the list, a student must have achieved at least a 3.5 grade point average while taking a minimum of 12 credit hours.

Students named to the dean’s list include:

    • Maura Cupicha, of Wyoming;

    • Elijah Buck, of Warsaw;

    • Jamie Irwin, of Perry;

    • Samantha Pawlicki, of North Java;

    • Spencer Head and Kassandra Johnston, both of Attica; and

    • Ryan Madden, of Arcade.

Tuesday, February 7, 2017 at 4:36 pm

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The following were in Wyoming County Court Jan. 31 before Judge Michael Mohun.

Tyler Jennings was in court for motions. His case was adjourned to Feb. 15 for an appearance and March 8 for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Chad Staley was in court for motions. His case was adjourned to Feb. 15 for an appearance and March 8 for a Huntley Hearing. 

The following were in county court Feb. 1 before Mohun.

Chivone Gheorghe was in court for a Huntley Hearing. The decision has been reserved and the case adjourned to March 2.

Heidi Hopkins, who is accused of a crime in Perry, pled not guilty to two counts of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree and two counts of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree, all are Class B felonies. Motions are scheduled March 30. Bail was set at $50,000 cash or $100,000 bond.

Roy Lawrence, who is accused of a crime in Perry, pled not guilty to two counts of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree and two counts of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree, all are Class B felonies. Motions are scheduled March 30. Bail was set at $25,000 cash and $50,000 bond.

The following were in county court Feb. 2 before Mohun.

Grayson Stock, who committed a crime in Arcade, pled guilty to criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree, a misdemeanor. He waived his right to appeal and is scheduled for sentencing April 27.

Jody Nelligan, who committed a crime in Arcade, was sentenced to five years probation and restitution of $26,075.55. She was convicted of attempted arson in the third degree.

Katrina Chandler, who is accused of a crime in Attica, pled not guilty to two counts of forgery in the second degree, both are Class D felonies, and two counts of petit larceny, a misdemeanor. The case is adjourned to April 27 for pre plea investigation.

Tammy Miller, who is accused of a crime in Attica, had her case adjourned to March 3 for trial.

John Townley, who committed a crime in Eagle, pled guilty to criminal mischief in the third degree, a Class E felony. He waived his right to appeal. The case was adjourned to April 27 for sentencing.

Jerod Trebian, who committed a crime in Silver Springs, had his case adjourned to Thursday for sentencing.

Ryan McDanel, who is accused of a crime in Warsaw, pled not guilty to two counts of attempted criminal possession of a weapon in the second degree, both as Class D felonies, and attempted criminal possession of a weapon in the third degree, a Class E felony. Motions are scheduled for March 30. Bail continues at $2,500.

Dekota Leiser is accused of a crime in Warsaw. Leiser's case is adjourned to Wednesday. 

Chastity Brace, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to a one-year conditional discharge and a five-year order of protection was issued. She pled guilty to criminal possession of a weapon in the fourth degree. Brace, who waived the right to appeal, was also arraigned on criminal possession of a weapon in the third degree, a Class D felony; unlawful imprisonment in the first degree, a Class E felony; and menacing in the second degree, a misdemeanor. Additionally, she admitted to a violation of probation which caused her probation to be revoked and she was resentenced to one year in prison with one year post-release supervision.

Julie Dutton, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to obstruct emergency medical services, a misdemeanor. She waived her right to appeal. She is scheduled for sentencing March 16.

Cory Goodenow, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to one-and-one-half years in prison and three years post-release supervision. An order of protection was issued, and he is responsible for court fees and surcharges. He was convicted of attempted rape in the second degree, a Class E felony.

Tracy Phillips, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to a three-year conditional discharge. She was convicted of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class D felony.

Eugene Matteson Sr., who is accused of a crime in Wyoming County, had his case adjourned to March 30.

The following were in county court before Mohun Feb. 6 and are from State Correctional Facilities in Attica.

Ronald Montgomery pled guilty to assault in the second degree, a Class D felony. He waived his right to appeal. Sentencing is scheduled April 12.

Billy Ray Staton was in court for motions. The case has been adjourned to March 2.

Jonathan Smith was in court for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant. The case has been adjourned to March 2.

Monday, February 6, 2017 at 3:33 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Perry, Eagle, Attica, news.
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       Ryan McDanel

Ryan D. McDanel, 33, of Perry, was charged Feb. 4 with arson in the fourth degree, a Class E felony. In the early morning hours of Feb. 4, Perry Police and the Perry Fire Department responded to 45 Watrous St. for a report of a deck fire. Following an investigation, Perry Police say the deck was set on fire by McDanel. He was put in Wyoming County Jail on $10,000 cash bail or $50,000 bond. He is due in Perry Village Court at a later date.

Ivy J. Hnat, no age provided, of Perry, was charged Feb. 4 with petit larceny and criminal possession of a forged instrument in the third degree. Hnat is accused of signing and cashing a check that was not hers. She is due in Perry Village Court Feb. 14.

Ronald Dedominces, 51, of Lakeview, was charged Feb. 4 with snowmobiling while intoxicated and snowmobiling with a BAC over .08 percent, both as misdemeanors. Dedominces was stopped at a snowmobile crossing on Route 39, Eagle, for a registration check. During the check, he was allegedly found to have been drinking. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say he failed field sobriety testing and was arrested. His snowmobile was towed from the scene and the suspect was taken to the Sheriff’s Office. He is due in the Town of Eagle Court Feb. 27.

Kelly Plowe, 46, of Akron, was arrested Feb. 2 on a violation of probation warrant out of the Town of Attica Court. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say she was located following a tip from their “Warrant Wednesday” program on Facebook. She was put in Wyoming County Jail without bail.

Friday, February 3, 2017 at 2:01 pm

Genesee Community College (GCC), including all seven campus locations in Warsaw, Arcade, Batavia, Albion, Dansville, Lima, and Medina, recently announced the dean’s list, provost’s list, and president’s list for the fall 2016 semester.

Dean's list honorees include:

    • Summer Beitz, Alicia Dylag, and Joelle Reiner, all of Attica;

    • Quinn Konfederath and Candace Bliss, both of Bliss;

    • Briona Terray, of Cowlesville;

    • Alyssa Witkowski, of Java Center;

    • Caitlin Pietron, of Pike;

    • Megan Gerde and Angela George, both of Strykersville;

    • Leanna Smith, Bethany Messe, Ciera Rinehart, Alicia Rast, Marissa Allard, and Caleb Miller, all of Perry;

    • Ashley Davis, of Portageville;

    • Heather Herrmann, of Silver Springs;

    • Shelagh Neeley, Makayla Irwin, Samantha Flint, Michael Cedrone, Manoj Rai, Allison Robb, and Sondra Lucas, all of Warsaw;

    • Kali Wright, Samantha Parsons, and Kaeleigh Bean, all of Wyoming;

    • Kaitlin Erb, Dylan Smoot, William Plume, Craig Fitzgerald, Amanda Fuller, and Tyler Marble, all of Arcade; and

    • Kory Debeau, of North Java.

Students named to the dean's list have earned a quality point index of 3.50 to 3.74.

Provost's list honorees include:

    • Abigail Skillman, of Arcade;

    • Casey Callahan, Nathaniel Washington, Shirl Clark, Marilyn-Lacy Leto, Lisa Deahn, and Julie Slepinski, all of Attica;

    • Stephanie Kehr, of Java Center;

    • Julia Chojnacki and Rachel Werner, of Varysburg;

    • Andrea Harter, Andrea Prince, and Hillary Shaffer, all of Perry;

    • Kristen Stephany, Zachary Brewer, Ashley Carney, and Delores Cedrone, all of Warsaw; and

    • Christopher Herrmann, of Wyoming.

Students named to the provost's list have maintained part-time enrollment and earned a quality point index of 3.75.

President's list honorees include:

    • Zachary Harrigan, Steven Boje, Katie Simar, Andrew Hyman, Zachary Wiedemann, Courtney Westberg, Ashley Miller, and Meghan Potter, all of Arcade;

    • Brittany Anderson, Nicholas Shadbolt, Gina Glor, Sydney Breton, Ryan Napieralski, John Burek, Rachel Beck, Courtney Schaller, Savannah Bartosik, Matthew Langerman, Samantha Long, and Brandon Storch, all of Attica;

    • Padraic Brazeau, of Cowlesville;

    • Barbara Brown and Brooke Tisdale, both of Gainesville;

    • Holly Benkleman and Adrian McMahon, both of North Java;

    • Anthony Wolowiec, Madeleine Weisenburg, and Olivia Herrmann, all of Strykersville;

    • Jeffrey Mincer, of Varysburg;

    • Patrick Rice and Adam DeLaVergne, both of Perry; 

    • Paul Torrey, of Silver Springs; and

    • Megan Hollister, Michelle LaBelle, Collyn Frank, Jennifer Cummins, Sarah Ushurova, Aaron Almeter, Micaela Van Buren, Amanda Pahuta, and Tracy Stevenson, all of Warsaw.

Those on the president's list comprised of full-time students who earned a quality point index of 3.75.

GCC offers over 65 academic programs and certificates, including the new Marketing and Social Media concentration within the Business Administration program. Additionally, the new Nanotechnology degree with ECC focus’s on the microscopic scale for jobs in biology, chemistry, electrical engineering, medicine, and photovoltaics.

The college has seven campus locations throughout Western New York, as well as through its online learning program. College housing is available at College Village, Batavia. 

For further information about all of GCC's opportunities, go to www.genesee.edu.

Friday, February 3, 2017 at 12:31 pm

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File photo.

The Arcade & Attica Railroad Corp recently received $1.3 million through the governor’s Passenger and Freight Rail Assistance Program. The funding will be used to rehabilitate a bridge and six miles of track to accommodate heavier rail cars.

“These investments not only support safe and reliable rail transportation, they also promote economic development and ensure growth in communities across the state,” said Sen. Patrick M. Gallivan, (R-C-I, Elma). 

New York awarded $25 million to 19 applicants through a competitive solicitation process. These investments will support track rehabilitation, capacity expansion, railroad bridge repairs, and economic development opportunities. 

Gallivan also says the Livonia, Avon & Lakeville Railroad Corp. in Livingston County received $1.1 million to rehabilitate yard tracks in Lakeville and Avon.

“I’m pleased that rail projects in Wyoming and Livingston counties are among those being funded.”

Additionally, $5.4 million in private and local funding is being leveraged through this state initiative. The funding will support projects that strengthen infrastructure and economic development throughout the state.

Wednesday, February 1, 2017 at 12:05 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, court, crime, Attica, news.

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The following are from State Correctional Facilities and were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun Jan. 30. 

Bail is set for state inmate cases for two reasons:

    • In the event that the inmates current sentence is overturned on appeal or the inmates sentence is about to expire the bail will kick in on the new case and the inmate would be turned over to the Wyoming County jail while the new case is pending; and

    • When bail is placed on an inmate it follows the inmate so when they are moved to different facilities it is one way for them to be found and also the state system knows there is another case still pending.

James Smith had his case adjourned for trial April 7.

Chester Jones had his case adjourned for trial May 30.

Jamal Wilson had his case adjourned for trial May 30.

Jerry Gillard pled not guilty to: two counts of promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony; criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fourth degree, a Class C felony; and conspiracy in the fourth degree, a Class E felony. Motions are scheduled March 15. Bail was set at $10,000.

Christian Manley is scheduled for a Huntley Hearing Feb. 21. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Kimberly Gillard, of Attica, was in Wyoming County Court Jan. 30 and had her case adjourned to March 15 for motions.

Monday, January 30, 2017 at 7:13 pm

The following students were named to the dean's list at Paul Smith's College during the fall 2016 semester. Each earned a semester average of 3.3 or higher to receive this distinction.

Jacob Kowalewski, of Cowlesville, is majoring in fisheries and wildlife sciences, earned a semester average of 3.3 or higher to receive this distinction. He was also named an Adirondack Scholar, having achieved a cumulative average of at least 3.8.

Victoria Krolczyk, of Varysburg, is majoring in biology, earned a semester average of 3.3 or higher to receive this distinction. She was also named an Adirondack Scholar, having achieved a cumulative average of at least 3.8.

Dakotta Loft, who is majoring in fisheries and wildlife science, and James Neary, who is majoring in integrative studies, both of Attica, earned semester averages of 3.3 or higher to receive this distinction.

Paul Smith's College is the only four-year institution of higher education in the Adirondacks. Its programs include hospitality, culinary arts, forestry, natural resources, entrepreneurship and the sciences. For more information, visit paulsmiths.edu.

Tuesday, January 24, 2017 at 5:39 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, Arcade, Attica, Perry, Warsaw, education.

Several area students were named to SUNY Oswego’s fall 2016 dean’t list and president’l list.

The dean’s list recognizes students who received a grade point average of 3.3 to 3.79. Oswego students receiving a GPA of 3.8 to 4.0 earn president's list recognition.

Dean’s list honors go to:

    • Allison Jackson, of Arcade, a senior business administration major;

    • Breck J. Donohue, of Attica, a sophomore cinema and screen studies major;

    • Haley R. Parker, of Perry, a senior adolescence education major; and 

    • Brooke L. Lehr, of Warsaw, a sophomore journalism major.

President’s list honors go to:

    • Benjamin Aylsworth, of Attica, a senior majoring in history.

U.S. News Media Group counts Oswego among the top public regional universities in the North for 2017. The Princeton Review includes the college in its 2017 college guidebook "The Best Northeastern Colleges.” It’s also on the Princeton Review’s national list of "Green Colleges."

The 156-year-old college has an enrollment of about 8,000 students in its College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; School of Business; School of Communication, Media and the Arts; and School of Education.

Visit oswego.edu for more information.

 

Tuesday, January 24, 2017 at 5:25 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, education, Arcade, Castile, Perry, Attica.

Several local students made the fall 2016 semester dean’s list at Nazareth College, Rochester.

They include: 

    • John Beyer, of Arcade, who is studying psychology;

    • Katriel DeGolyer, who is studying English literature, and Alexandra Scharet, who is studying social work, both of Castile;

    • Zachary Lowery, of Perry, who is studying health sciences; and

    • McKenzie McLaughlin, of Attica, who is studying psychology.

A student's grade point average must be at least 3.5 or above, and they must complete 12 credit hours of graded work that semester in order to be included on the dean's list at Nazareth.

Nazareth College offers 60 majors, including education, health and human services, management, the fine arts, music, theater, math and science, foreign languages, and the liberal arts. The college supports 2,000 undergrads and 800 graduate students. 

Nazareth is recognized nationally for its Fulbright global student scholars and commitment to civic engagement. 

Monday, January 23, 2017 at 2:16 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, inauguration, D.C., Attica, president.

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Photos submitted by Nathan Montford.

It was the first inauguration he had gone to, saying he “had to” because of his support for now President Donald Trump and the Republican party. Nathan Montford likened it to “our generation’s political Woodstock.”

“I didn’t understand so much on how one president has so much influence on a generation,” Montford, of Attica, said. “The way this country was heading…we needed to get out of the direction we were going. We were being laughed at by how weak our country has become. I had to make the trip just to support the new president.”

Inside the arena of the inaugural event, Montford said there were “hundreds of thousands” of people – lawyers, doctors, blue-collar workers…people of all races, colors and creeds – yet it was so peaceful, he didn’t even know the protests were going on outside the event.

“(The issue of) Race is what the liberal media sites have stoked the fire about. There were a few protestors in there, but it was peaceful. It was exciting. Nobody looked at color or what they were wearing, it was like the burden of the last eight years lifted off our shoulders.”

Just the energy alone raised the hairs on his arms and brought goosebumps to his flesh.

“It was one of the most un-elite political speeches a president had ever made. The words that came out of is mouth were more of ‘We the People’ run this country, not the elites. It made you feel that there is home and everyone can be as one. It’s going to take time, but it can be done.”

During his journey in Washington he met a woman who immigrated from Asia, now lives in Michigan, and is the founder and owner of two sushi bars. He met an African-American guy on a bus and struck up a conversation after the man asked him if he rode (motorcycles); Montford said he had been wearing his Harley-Davidson coat. He met people from NYC, Syracuse and Olean.

“There was this energy of hope that we can get this country back on track. Everyone was peaceful, kind, nice and excited about the future. The opposite of what the ‘mainstream’ or liberal media wants to show. So many people came together. What creates the racial division is if we keep putting this separation on people. It’s lumping a particular group into one category that divides the nation.”

Although there were a few protesters, they were outnumbers by the president’s supporters, and for the most part, Montford says, it was “absolutely great energy, people wanted to get to know each other.”

“I was proud to represent an area that did represent Trump, and represent the Republican Committee, and of course Attica. Nobody has a crystal ball, just take a deep breath and give the man a chance. They may like the end result.”

Montford says that in the end, we – both the protesters and supporters – really want the same thing. Peace, and to just get along.

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Thursday, January 19, 2017 at 11:21 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Attica, prison.

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The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun Jan. 18. Additionally, they are from State Correctional Facilities in Attica. 

Bail is set for state inmate cases for two reasons:

    • In the event that the inmates current sentence is overturned on appeal or the inmates sentence is about to expire the bail will kick in on the new case and the inmate would be turned over to the Wyoming County jail while the new case is pending; and

    • When bail is placed on an inmate it follows the inmate so when they are moved to different facilities it is one way for them to be found and also the state system knows there is another case still pending.

A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Cesar Aguayo pled guilty to attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled March 15.

Brian Atkins Jr. pled guilty to attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled Feb. 22.

Diquan Wells pled guilty to attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled Feb. 22.

Isaiah Weathers pled guilty to attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled March 15.

Patrick Hill pled not guilty to promoting prison contraband in the first degree, criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, both as Class D felonies, and conspiracy in the fifth degree, a Class A misdemeanor. Bail was set at $10,000. Motions are scheduled March 15.

Latiff Dudley was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison, and fees and surcharges on the conviction of attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony. The sentence is to run consecutively to any current unfinished term.

Chivonne Gheorghe had his case adjourned to Feb. 1 for a Huntley Hearing. 

Jonathan Smith had his case adjourned to Feb. 6 for a Huntley Hearing.

Michael Boyd was in court for a SORA appearance. He was determined to be a Level 3 sex offender. Sex Offender Registry Act: Sex offenders are required by the SORA to verify their information in the Registry at specified intervals. There are three levels of sex offenders: Level 1 (low risk of re-offense), Level 2 (medium risk of re-offense) and Level 3 (high risk of re-offense); risk level is set by a judge after a court hearing.

Javon Woods had his case adjourned to Feb. 22.

William Townsend pled guilty to attempted assault in the first degree, a Class C violent felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled March 15.

Joshua Nieves had his case adjourned to Feb. 22 for motions.

Billyray Staton had his case adjourned to Feb. 6.

Wednesday, January 18, 2017 at 12:03 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Attica, news.

In the past few weeks several Village of Attica residents have been taken in by what are called Family Emergency Scams. This type of scam mainly focuses on the elderly in the community. 

Attica Police Chief Dean Hendershott says a few weeks ago an elderly couple was scammed out of $4,000 and yesterday another elderly couple was targeted. 

Officials say a “very alert and concerned employee” of the Walmart in Batavia intervened and prevented the couple from losing $2,500. The employee assisted the couple in verifying the phone number given to them by the alleged scammers. Subsequently, the number was indeed listed in the national data base as a scamming number, the couple’s purchase was reimbursed, and they returned home and reported the incident to police.

“If anyone receives such a phone call, please be vigilant and verify the emergency,” Hendershott said. “Scammers use very deceptive and believable tricks. Resist the urge to act immediately, no matter how dramatic the story is.”

The scam begins with a phone call, voice mail or a message sent via text by a relative or friend of the relative to wire money immediately. 

The suspect(s) in the scam will be a younger male or female identifying themselves as a grandchild or child. Stating they have been arrested out of state or have been in a terrible accident. They will present uncanny information about the person and relationship with the potential victim. The story is intended to be dramatic and the caller will have very specific information which would lead the victim to believe the story is real. 

The scam calls on the elderly to go to a chain store, purchase two identical gift cards for a specified amount then call the number back and render the gift cards numbers and security code on the back of the card. Once this was done the money was received and the money was transferred off the card immediately.

Police officials ask residents to verify the caller’s identity by asking questions that a stranger couldn’t possibly answer or check the story out with someone else in your family, circle of friends or police. 

“The scammers will make every attempt to convince you to keep it secret, this is the crux of the scam. Do not ever wire money, send a check or money order by overnight delivery, or purchase gift cards in large amounts.

“My heartfelt and professional thanks goes out to that Walmart Employee,” Hendershott said. “In my eyes, that employee is not only a hero, but an employee who has gone way above and beyond to assist a customer.”

Report all possible fraud to your local police agency. 

Reports can also be called into the Federal Trade Commission Consumer Information line at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877- 382-4357). 

To report a complaint online visit ftc.gov/complaint Consumer Information, Family Emergency Scams.

Tuesday, January 17, 2017 at 11:51 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, announcements, Warsaw, Arcade, Perry, Attica, Bennington.

Highlighting a decade of economic development growth for the county, the Wyoming County Business Center Inc. (WCBC) recently celebrated its 10th anniversary.

Established in 2006 by the county’s Board of Supervisors, the WCBC became the small business economic development agency in the county.

The not-for-profit local development corporation works with county economic development partners – the Industrial Development Agency (IDA), the Planning Department, the Chamber of Commerce & Tourism, and the Business Education Council (BEC) –  “to provide opportunities for business growth by promoting and assisting economic development projects that result in capital investments and job creation and retention in Wyoming County.”

The WCBC plays a vital role in the development of entrepreneurs, assistance of retail projects, micro lending, marketing for business attraction, and real estate redevelopment projects. It also plays an integral role in the development of shovel ready sites (at the stage where workers can be employed and construction can begin), and of both green sites (the practice of maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings and sites while minimizing the impact on human health and the environment) and “environmentally challenged” (contaminated) property for expanding businesses and businesses considering locating in the county.

Recently, Buffalo Business First recognized five Wyoming County communities, among 77, for having the strongest entrepreneurial spirit in Western New York, stating “the entrepreneurial spirit is alive and well in these communities.”

Of the 77 communities listed, locally they include, in order of ranking:

    • #21 the Town of Arcade – population 4,158, of which 1,216 are full-time workers and 119 (9.8 percent) are self-employed;

    • #25 Town of Bennington –  population of 3,316, with 1,204 full-time workers and 114 (9.5 percent) self-employed; 

    • #28 Town of Warsaw – population 4,989, of which 1,645 are full-time workers and 136 (8.3 percent) are self-employed;

    • #32 Town of Attica – population 7,520, with 1,343 full-time workers and 108 (8 percent) self-employed; and

    • #56 Town of Perry – population 4,497, of which 1,463 are full-time workers and 81 (5.5 percent) are self-employed.

According to the report, the statistics are from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2015 American Community Survey, which compiles the data at the local level. The rankings are based on the percentage who are self-employed.

To assist community entrepreneurs, the Business Center offers the entrepreneurship development program FastTrac New Venture. This program provides participants the necessary tools to refine their innovative business idea. 

Since its inception, the program has educated more than 120 entrepreneurs. It has enabled them to overcome barriers and challenges common in starting a new business while assisting them in building a strong, solid business plan. In turn, 53 businesses have started, thus creating more than 90 jobs in the county. Additionally, these jobs provide a source of new tax base both for real property and sales tax. 

“The program has been extremely successful and FastTrac is a core component of economic development growth and job creation in Wyoming County,” said WCBC President Jim Pierce.

The Business Center also administers a low-interest micro-loan program to assist new business startups and established retail businesses. The loans coordinate financial assistance and incentives with its economic development partners. Currently there are 14 businesses in the Center’s loan portfolio. 

In 2016 it also developed a new business attraction marketing program to draw attention to the county’s assets and its location as a great place to expand or locate new business. 

The marketing program and collateral marketing pieces that have been developed were the results of a series of focus group meetings with stakeholders. They worked to develop a marketing strategy promoting the attractiveness of Wyoming County for new business. They include a new marketing logo and tag line, and a website that highlights the business strengths of Wyoming County.

The website features a brochure and selling points for three targeted industries – agri-business, advanced manufacturing, and recreation and tourism businesses. It headlines three short videos featuring existing companies in the county. Representatives of each company bestow the benefits and successes they have realized being located within the county’s borders.

Additionally, the videos showcase the strength and attractiveness of the workforce, why these businesses are so successful in Wyoming County and why other businesses should consider a location here.

“We are proud to enter into our next decade and thank the Wyoming County Board of Supervisors and the Business Center’s Board of Directors. We are greatly appreciative of the generous FastTrac program sponsors – Tompkins Bank of Castile and Complete Payroll (the workforce development resources available to FastTrac participants through Community Action for Wyoming County), the program facilitators Jeff Fitch and Mike Fitch, along with numerous guest speakers and support from the IDA,” Pierce said. “Thank you to everyone who has played a role in the Business Center and our collective work to improve the economic viability of Wyoming County. 

“The Business Center will continue to provide a very important role in economic development through assisting retail projects looking to grow and expand, micro lending, business attraction marketing and entrepreneurship development with the FastTrac program. We are a network, an information hub, a partner, a resource connector and an advisor all focused on strengthening economic development in the county.”

Visit wyomingcountyny.org to see the most recently added recreation and tourism business attraction video. Contact Pierce at jpierce@wycoida.org or (585) 786- 3764 for attractive incentives and resources available.

To learn more about the Kauffman Foundation’s FastTrac New Venture Program or upcoming informational open house for start-up and small businesses visit www.wycobusiness.org or contact Jennifer Tyczka at jtyczka@wycoida.org or (585) 786- 3764.

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