Attica

Wednesday, August 16, 2017 at 8:18 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, accident, Attica.

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Wyoming County Sheriff's deputies say the driver of a small sedan swerved to avoid hitting a woodchuck and ended up hitting a cow barn. A woman traveling north on Exchange Street allegedly lost control of her vehicle attempting to avoid the rodent and crossed the roadway, went through an electric fence and hit the barn.

While neither the driver nor any cows were injured in the mishap, the building did sustain damages. However, deputies say, according to the Wyoming County Building Inspector the damages to the barn do not pose a safety hazard.

The Attica Fire Department assisted police at the scene.

No charges were filed at this time.

Friday, August 11, 2017 at 5:32 pm

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In September a fundraising committee was formed. By March they had raised close to $63,000. And in May, the Stevens Memorial Library in Attica was awarded $303,233 in funding for construction projects and upgrades to the building.

With construction looming on the horizon, Library Director Nancy Burns, members of the fundraising committee, local dignitaries, and community members gathered for a ground-breaking ceremony Wednesday at the facility.

See related: Big changes in store at Stevens Memorial Library in Attica

Friday, August 11, 2017 at 12:19 pm

Kevin M. Johnson, 32, of Gainesville, was charged Aug. 8 with: driving while intoxicated as a felony due to a previous conviction within 10 years; circumventing an ignition interlock device; aggravated unlicensed operation of a vehicle in the third degree; and speed exceeding 55 mph. Johnson was stopped on Route 238, Attica, for allegedly speeding. During the investigation, Troopers say they detected an odor of alcohol, subsequently field sobriety testing was conducted as well as a breath test. His BAC was allegedly .08 percent. He is due in the Town of Attica Court Aug. 21.

Michael S. Slocum, 29, of Silver Springs, was charged Aug. 8 with: driving while intoxicated as a felony due to a previous conviction within 10 years; circumventing an interlock device; aggravated unlicensed operation of a vehicle in the first degree; drinking alcohol in a motor vehicle on a highway; moving from lane unsafely; and unlawful possession of marijuana. Troopers responded to a vehicle in a ditch on Wethersfield Road, Gainesville, in which Slocum allegedly appeared to be intoxicated. Additionally, Troopers say a small bag of marijuana was found. He was given field sobriety testing, which he is said to have failed. He was taken to the State Police barracks in Warsaw for processing where his BAC was allegedly recorded at .17 percent. He was put in Wyoming County Jail on $1,000 cash bail or $2,000 bond.

Matthew J. Wesolowski, 23, of Cowlesville, was charged Aug. 6 with driving while ability impaired by drugs and unlawful possession of marijuana. State Troopers say they responded to a 9-1-1 call of someone screaming and a loud bang on Church Road in the Town of Bennington. When police arrived on the scene they located a vehicle in a ditch. Troopers say the driver, Wesolowski, allegedly appeared to be under the influence of drugs and a small bag of marijuana was found in the vehicle. He was given field sobriety tests, which police say he failed and taken to State Police barracks in Warsaw. He was evaluated by a drug recognition expert and charged with the above offenses. He is due in the Town of Bennington Court Aug. 14.

Nicholas J. Kinmartin, 31, of Arcade, was charged Aug. 9 with 20 counts of petit larceny. Troopers say Kinmartin was seen on video approximately 17 times shoplifting merchandise from the 7-Eleven, Route 16, Yorkshire. The value of the items he allegedly stole was approximately $1,438. He was processed at the State Police barracks in Machias and released. He is due in the Town of Yorkshire Court later this month.

Friday, August 4, 2017 at 4:39 pm

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun Aug. 2.

Steven Green, an inmate in a State Correctional Facility, pled not guilty to two counts of assault in the second degree, both are Class D felonies. Motions are scheduled Sept. 20. Bail was set at $5,000 cash and $10,000 bond. Bail is set for state inmate cases for two reasons:

    • In the event that the inmate’s current sentence is overturned on appeal or the inmate’s sentence is about to expire the bail will kick in on the new case and the inmate would be turned over to the Wyoming County jail while the new case is pending; and

    • When bail is placed on an inmate it follows the inmate so when they are moved to different facilities it is one way for them to be found and also the state system knows there is another case still pending.

Christina Dadey, who is accused of a crime in Middlebury, waived indictment and pled not guilty to aggravated driving while intoxicated, per se, and driving while intoxicated, both as Class E felonies; operating a motor vehicle without a court ordered ignition interlock device, a misdemeanor, failure to keep right, and consumption of alcoholic beverages in certain motor vehicles. The Per Se law is based not on the observations of the arresting police officer, but the results obtained from an intoxilyzer machine. The case has been adjourned to Aug. 17 for conference and Sept. 20 for motions.

The following were in court Aug. 3.

Cory Dahl, who is accused of a crime in Castile, had his case adjourned to Sept. 14 for motions.

Ervin Delude Sr., who committed a crime in Gainesville, pled guilty to two counts of aggravated family offense, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled Aug. 31. He is being held without bail in the Wyoming County Jail.

Carl Vander, who committed a crime in Perry, was sentenced to two-and-one-half to five years in prison on the conviction of grand larceny in the third degree, a Class D felony. He was also sentenced to two to four years in prison for grand larceny in the fourth degree, a Class E felony. The sentences are to run concurrently with each other and with violations of probation. He is also jointly responsible with his co-defendant for $4,630 in restitution, and fees and surcharges.

Tylor Phinney, who committed a crime in Sheldon, was sentenced to five years probation, $1,456.41 in restitution, and fees and surcharges on the conviction of attempted assault in the second degree, a Class E felony.

Brandon McCoy, who committed a crime in Warsaw and previously admitted to violating interim probation, was sentenced to five years probation, $1,104.54 in restitution and 170 hours of community service. He was convicted of grand larceny in the fourth degree, a Class E felony, and conspiracy in the fifth degree.

John Sprague, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced on the conviction of failure to register as a sex offender, a Class E felony, and forcible touching, a misdemeanor, to one year in jail on both charges. The sentences are to run concurrently. Additionally, an order of protection was issued, an agreement of registering as a Level 2 sex offender was ordered, and he is responsible for $1,425 in restitution, and fees and surcharges.

Go Go, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was arraigned on an indictment for driving while ability impaired by drugs and DWAI – combined influence of drugs or of drugs and alcohol, both are Class D felonies; aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the first degree, a Class E felony, and operating a motor vehicle without a court ordered ignition interlock device, a misdemeanor. Go Go pled guilty to DWAI – drugs, a Class D felony. Sentencing is scheduled Oct. 26. They are being held without bail in the Wyoming County Jail.

Cheyenne Kimbrell, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, was arraigned on a violation of probation. The case has been adjourned to Wednesday. Kimbrell is being held without bail in the Wyoming County Jail.

Elizabeth Mattingly, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, admitted to a violation of probation. Probation was revoked and she was sentenced to nine months in jail.

Carl Vander, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, admitted to two violations of probation and was sentenced to one-and-one-third to four years in prison on both charges. The sentences are to run concurrently.

Friday, August 4, 2017 at 2:54 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Attica Rodeo, Attica.

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The 60th annual Attica Rodeo kicked off Thursday evening to a small but mighty crowd.

Performances at the rodeo grounds, Exchange Street, Attica, begin at 8 tonight and Saturday – gates open at 6 p.m., with matinee performances Saturday at 1 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. – gates open at 11 a.m. and noon, respectively.

Contestants compete in more than eight rodeo events including bareback and saddle bronc riding, tie-down roping, cowgirls breakaway, barrel racking, bull riding and more. Although all performances contain the same events, participants are different.

Tickets are $18 for adults, $8 for children 6 to 12 years old, and free for kids 5 years old and younger.

For more information visit http://www.atticarodeo.us/index.html

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Thursday, August 3, 2017 at 6:02 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Perry, Attica.

Nicholas D. Maroney, 20, of Perry, was charged Aug. 3 with endangering the welfare of a child, a Class A misdemeanor. Maroney, now a former camp counselor at YMCA Genesee/Camp Hough on West Lake Road, Castile, is accused of returning to the campground intoxicated and going into the wrong cabin to sleep. State Police say he was seen by other staff and campers exiting the occupied bunk bed of a 7-year-old female camper in the morning. At this time there is no report of sexual contact. He was arrested without incident and arraigned in the Town of Castile Court. He was jailed in lieu of bail or bond in the Wyoming County Jail. He is due in the Town of Castile Court Monday.

Michael A. Young, 36, of Attica, was charged Aug. 3 with driving while intoxicated – first offense, driving to the left of pavement markings and speed in excess of 55 mph. Young is accused of traveling in excess of 75 mph and crossing the center line on Main Street in Alexander. Further charges are pending on the results of a blood test. He is due in the Alexander Town Court Oct. 3.

Thursday, August 3, 2017 at 10:21 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, weather, flooding, Attica.

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Press release from Wyoming County Emergency Managment, file photo:

The New York State Department of Financial Services Mobile Command Center will be on site today in the Village of Attica. They will be located at the Department of Public Works facility, 43 Exchange St.

The purpose of this command center is to help residents and businesses with the recovery process from the severe flooding that occurred in Wyoming County on July 13. They intend to be on site until 8 p.m.

Wednesday, August 2, 2017 at 6:54 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, education, announcements, Arcade, Attica, Perry, Warsaw.

More than 1,000 students completed their baccalaureate studies at State University of New York at Oswego in spring 2017 and were recognized during commencement in May.

A student who graduates with honors is indicated by the traditional Latin phrases summa cum laude, with highest honor (grade averages of 3.8 to 4.0); magna cum laude, with great honor (grade averages of 3.6 to 3.79); and cum laude, with honor (grade averages of 3.30 to 3.59).

Graduates from the area include:

    • Benjamin G. Aylsworth, of Attica, earned his degree in history, summa cum laude;

    • Haley R. Parker, of Perry, earned her degree in adolescence education, cum laude;

    • Alyssa R. Aldrich, of Warsaw, earned her degree in biochemistry; and

    • Teraisa S. Matuszak, of Arcade, earned her degree in career and technical education.

U.S. News Media Group counts SUNY Oswego among the top public regional universities in the North for 2017, and the Princeton Review includes Oswego in its 2017 college guidebook "The Best Northeastern Colleges" and in its national list of "Green Colleges."

A 156-year-old comprehensive college in the SUNY system, Oswego enrolls about 8,000 students in its College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; School of Business; School of Communication, Media and the Arts; and School of Education.

Visit oswego.edu/gradstudies for more information.

 

Monday, July 31, 2017 at 1:33 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Perry, Attica, Wyoming.

Adam M. Jellison, 39, of Attica, was charged July 30 with two counts of aggravated harassment, two counts of assault in the third degree, criminal mischief in the fourth degree, unlawful imprisonment in the second degree, and strangulation in the second degree. Attica PD responded to a violent domestic incident on Prospect Street in the predawn hours Sunday. Following an investigation, Jellison was charged with the noted offenses. He was arraigned in the Village of Attica Court where bail was set at  $20,000 cash or $40,000 bond. A full stay-away order of protection was also issued. He is due in court Aug. 21.

Ryan J. Mosher, 24, of Perry, was arrested July 28 for endangering the welfare of a child. Perry Police say Mosher is accused of abusing a 3-year-old girl. He was arraigned in Warsaw Town Court. He was put in Wyoming County Jail on $2,500 cash bail or $5,000 bond. He is due in the Village of Perry Court Aug. 1.

Charles H. Woodworth, 71, of Perry, was charged July 25 with criminal mischief in the fourth degree and endangering the welfare of a child. Woodworth is accused of throwing a coffee cup at a female, causing it to break during a domestic dispute. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say the incident took place in front of a 3-year-old child. He is due in the Town of Perry Court Aug. 23.

Christian J. Finkney, 29, of Wyoming, was charged July 26 with: aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the second degree – alcohol-related revocation; aggravated unlicensed operation in the second degree – three or more dates; aggravated unlicensed operation in the third degree; operating a motor vehicle without an ignition interlock device; and unlicensed operator. Deputies say, around 9:30 p.m. July 26 Finkney’s vehicle was seen at a closed business in the Village of Wyoming and he was walking around the exterior of the building. During the investigation, it was found he had permission to be at the business. However, deputies say he drove there with a revoked New York State non-driver identification card. Finkney was arraigned in the Village of Warsaw Court where bail was set at $500 cash or $2,000 bond. He is due in the Town of Middlebury Court July 31.

Friday, July 28, 2017 at 5:09 pm

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Press release, photo submitted:

Shake on the Lake, Wyoming County’s Professional Shakespeare Festival celebrates its sixth season by producing its first tragedy, "Romeo & Juliet." This year’s tour is the largest to date and takes the company to eight counties – Wyoming, Livingston, Genesee, Orleans, Erie, Niagara, Monroe and Cattaraugus.

Josh Rice, co-founder and producing artistic director of Shake on the Lake, organized the company in 2012 to fulfill a life’s dream to bring professional theater to his hometown of Silver Lake. Since then, this rural-based company has grown from three professional theater artists to nearly a dozen and from four live shows to 16 during this year’s "Romeo & Juliet: tour.

“After producing comedies for the first five seasons, this year we are doing our first tragedy,” Rice said. “ 'Romeo & Juliet' is Shakespeare’s best-known play and is actually quite funny for the first three acts. Then, things get really interesting. We are excited to show people how we can put a mirror up to these 400-year-old plays and reflect back to audiences things that are still as relevant now, in 2017.”

Chad Bradford, associate artistic director, and founding company member is directing this year’s performance. He has helped shape the creative and collaborative process that Shake on the Lake is known for in their fast, physical, and fun style of adapting Shakespeare.

“When wrestling with a play as beautiful, iconic and famous as 'Romeo & Juliet,' one is tempted to take the bits and pieces of their favorite productions and cram them into a single performance,” Bradford said. “However, with the collaborative, ensemble-based working model that we have established here at Shake on the Lake, I’m learning things about the play that I never knew before.”

Both men are both alumni of the National Arts Strategies Creative Community Fellowship program, which specializes in creative placemaking through the arts.

Rice’s program, the Mnemonic Theatre Project (MTP), develops theater programs for seniors living with Alzheimer’s and dementia. After four years of successful programs in Westchester County, he is launching the inaugural MTP workshops in Wyoming County in conjunction with the Office of the Aging, and Alzheimer’s Caregiver Partnership of WNY.

Bradford’s project, Voices UnCaged, brings theater to inmates in New York and Arkansas. For the second year, he will bring this program to Groveland Correctional Facility in Livingston County. The one-week theater outreach program, with teaching artists from Shake on the Lake, will culminate in an original performance by the students for an audience of their fellow inmates and prison administrators.

The company returned for its residency in Silver Lake in mid-July. In addition to performing, the company has a full schedule of K-12 educational programming (Perry, Lyndonville, Belmont and Niagara Falls), community outreach, and performances throughout Western New York.

“We’re thrilled that Shake on the Lake is welcomed in so many communities throughout Western New York,” said Managing Director Pilar McKay. “This year we also joined the Theatre Alliance of Buffalo to strengthen our ties to the regional theater community and to represent professional theatre in rural areas.”

Performances in Wyoming County are scheduled as follows:

    • Attica: July 31 at the Attica Historical Society, Main Street. Performance is free;

    • Arcade: Aug. 1 at the Village of Arcade Park (sledding hill), Main Street, rain location at the Hope Lutheran Church, Main Street. Performance is free; and

    • Silver Lake: Aug. 3, 4 and 5 at the Public Beach, with a rain location at Epworth Hall, Silver Lake. Cost is $10 per person or $35 for five people.

All performances begin at 6:30 p.m.

Shake on the Lake partners with organizations in many of the tour venues including Lyndonville Area Foundation, Lyndonville; Niagara Falls Air Force Base, Niagara Falls; Springville Center for the Arts, Springville; Ellicottville Chamber of Commerce, Ellicottville; Western Monroe Historical Society, Brockport; GO ART!, Batavia; Orleans County Tourism, Point Breeze; Arts Council for Wyoming County (Wyoming County shows), Perry; Wyoming County Tourism (Wyoming County shows), Warsaw; and Dansville Rotary, Dansville.

Shake on the Lake is a live theater festival and is the first live outdoor theater festival in Wyoming County. The mission of the festival is to entertain, engage and enrich those in the community by creating professional theater productions in a natural, outdoor setting.

This program is supported by the NYSCA-A.R.T./New York Creative Opportunity Fund (a statewide Theatre Regrant Program), the Lyndonville Area Foundation, the Conable Family Foundation, and the Austin Community Foundation.

For more information on Shake on the Lake, including updates on events and fundraising, volunteer, and sponsorship opportunities visit www.shakeonthelake.org or email shakeonthelake@gmail.com.

Thursday, July 27, 2017 at 9:02 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, events, Attica, Warsaw.

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Photo provided by the Sheriff's Office.

He has the kind of voice akin to one's favorite song – an old familiar sound that can be listened to over and over and never becomes tiresome. For more than the past four decades, Jay Myers has been that song with the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office Dispatch Division.

Well, maybe he is more like a favorite crooner… Familiar. Reassuring. And for the county's residents who listen to the police and fire scanner calls, he is more recognized by the sound of his voice than what he looks like.

Although his last official day isn’t until July 30, on Tuesday, friends, family, and coworkers – past and present, gathered at the Vets Club in Warsaw to wish Senior Dispatcher Myers a happy retirement. 

“I do notice it more when Jay is not on (the scanner). It’s kind of weird,” said Bliss Fire Chief Clarence George. “He just has everything down. He’s got two ends to run on accident calls, he has to coordinate all the backup as well… not just calling the ambulance to an accident, but he also has the responsibility of relaying the information to other authorities. I really hate to see him go but…retirement is nice.”

He sits in his chair before a bank of computers, under dim lights and with a headset secure in place. He is an unassuming man. Quiet. Shy. Modest about his impact as a dispatcher and almost bashful when one recognizes his voice.

Myers can not only claim the title of the longest employee with dispatch – although Myers does dispute this, he is just about positive there was one guy who was a dispatcher for the county for about 42 years – he is also the last original employee from the Bureau of Fire.

At some point during the early 1980s, the Bureau was changed to a Civil Service job, thus being renamed to the Communications Division of the Sheriff’s Office. Even though by that point Myers had been doing the job for half-a-dozen years – give or take – he was required to apply for, take and pass the Civil Service test to keep his job.

He also began his career before the 9-1-1 emergency system was in effect and teletypes were the norm, as opposed to the wall of computers he sits in front of now. Calls were recorded on a reel-to-reel audio tape recorder – its tapes had to be changed nightly, a card file system was used, and calls were taken with pen and paper – a habit Myers carries to this day.

“It is not easy keeping up with the technological advances,” said Sheriff Greg Rudolph. “When Jay started there was a microphone and calls were handwritten and documented on cards. Now everything is computerized (phone, radio, computer-aided dispatch). To put it in perspective, he started when 9-1-1 was cutting technology and most phones had stickers on them with local emergency numbers.”

Throughout his career, major technological advances have simplified (meaning less paperwork) his job and streamlined communication between dispatchers and emergency personnel.

Yet, technology wasn’t the only upgrade to the division.

“I started in 1976 in a small 10 (foot) by 10 (foot) workspace. During the winter we’d put plastic on the windows to keep warm. During the summer, the AC would freeze up,” Myers said. “And Arcade had their own dispatcher for fire and police. That was her business right in her home. If an incident warranted, she would then call dispatch.”

“Jay has gone from the tiny little room in the old jail to the nice spacious room that we are in today. He has seen the advent of computers and the major changes in the county radio system,” said Fire and Emergency Management Director Tony Santoro. “When he started there was only one tower location in the county – that was not very reliable – to the eight-tower system that we have today. He went through the implantation of the E9-1-1 system and from not having a CAD (computer-aided dispatch) and map system to having a system that is very automated.”

The only thing that had not changed since Myers started his job was the two dispatchers per shift schedule. During any given shift in the Communications Division, there are two dispatchers on duty. However, if the emergency warrants it, such as the recent weather events, a third dispatcher is brought in.

“Back then, we had to call each and every car to know where they were. The only computers we had at the time were teletypes for getting the information to the patrol cars,” Myers said. “We were also responsible for taking bail money for inmates and were the point of contact for inmate visitors. But the visits were only on Saturdays and Sundays.”

“He’s kept up with the technology,” said Emergency Management Fire Coordinator Bill Streicher. “Taking us older individuals and throwing a computer in front of us…He’s kept up. He’s always maintained a level of professionalism.”

Myers said he didn’t set out for communications as a career choice – he majored in Criminal Justice at Genesee Community College. But, it was an opportunity he says he had taken advantage of at the time and it sounded interesting.

“I was there when Jay first came on board,” said retired dispatcher Betty Fancher. “He’s a nice guy. That’s all there is to it.”

Fancher had been a dispatcher from 1976 until 1999 and has known Myers since he was a little kid.

“I was one of the dispatchers that trained Jay. He’s a very caring person; always wanted to learn.”

Sandy Tiede had worked with Myers for more than 30 years and says they couldn’t get to the call quick enough because he was already on top of it.

“We worked so many holidays together and it was somewhat quiet and it was nice to share a holiday with a friend when you can't be at home,” Tiede said.

While the job has intense moments at times, sometimes a bit of comedic relief is bound to inadvertently happen.

“One night right after briefing…we went in at 10:45 for briefing…we got into the office and Jay started cleaning. He liked to make sure everything was clean,” Tiede said. “While he was cleaning, he accidentally hit all the fire department buttons in the county. Sirens all over the county went off and people kept calling in and he just told them all to disregard. Fortunately, it was late at night instead of 4 a.m.”

“He’s a fireman so he knows what we are going through when we are on a call,” George said. “He knows what you’re going through when you get to a scene and knows what you have to do. He is someone with experience that’s nice to have on the other end.”

In addition to his “day job,” Myers is also the fire chief for the Attica Fire Department, beginning his career when he was 16 years old. However, as is the case now, he says there were special restrictions for the younger firefighters.

For as much as Myers had to learn and adapt to the ever changing technology, he was a teacher as much as he was a student.

“There are certain calls or complaints that are very frustrating and very stressful despite the number of years on the job,” Rudolph said. “But Jay never portrays that to the public. He may show it privately when the call is over, but never to someone seeking assistance….never!”

“Perseverance is the biggest one,” Streicher said. “And to remain as calm as possible through major events. Being clear in what is being said and say it in a precise manner.”

Myers says one of the most challenging aspects of his job is getting a location when people don’t really know where they are.

“It’s most difficult to get accurate information and understanding the caller when they are in a tense situation,” Myers said. “But it’s satisfying getting help to people who need it.”

While he says he’s going to miss some of the people – but generally sees them anyway – he is looking forward to a less complicated day.

But then again…

“I’m not really looking forward to it (retirement) because it’s a big change after doing the same schedule for the past 40 years of my life.”

“Jay will sincerely be missed at the Sheriff’s Office, not only for his reliable dispatching skills but because of the person he is and positive attitude and enjoyment he brings to the Division and Office,” Rudolph said. “We all have made the comment many, many times, ‘I want to go in and see what Jay is up to today.’ To me, there is no greater compliment to the type of person he is.”

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Above photo provided by the Sheriff's Office.

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Tuesday, July 25, 2017 at 10:28 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Arcade, Attica, Castile, Sheldon, Warsaw, Covington.

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun July 20.

Aaron Schinsing, who is accused of a crime in Arcade, pled not guilty to: burglary in the second degree, a Class C felony; criminal possession of stolen property in the fifth degree; and petit larceny. Motions are scheduled Sept. 14. Pre trial release continues.

Jose Serrano, who is accused of a crime in Arcade, has his case adjourned to Aug. 3.

Michael Marrale, who committed a crime in Attica, was sentenced to six months in jail and five years probation on each charge of: reckless endangerment in the first degree, a Class D felony; and driving while intoxicated, a Class E felony. The sentences are to run concurrently. Marrale is also responsible to pay a $2,500 fine and his driver’s license has been revoked.

Cory Dahl, who is accused of committing a crime in Castile, had his case adjourned to Aug. 3.

Scott Moulton, who committed a crime in Covington, pled guilty to criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony, and driving while ability impaired by drugs as a misdemeanor. Sentencing is scheduled Aug. 17.

Carlos Silva, who committed a crime in Sheldon, pled guilty to aggravated unlicensed operation in the first degree, a Class E felony. He was sentenced to time served, a $500 fine, and fees and surcharges.

Melissa Preen, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to one year in prison, two years post-release supervision with Willard, and fees and surcharges. Willard is a Drug Treatment Campus (DTC) operated by the NYS Department of Correctional Services and Community Supervision (DOCCS) in collaboration with OASAS (Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services). It was created in 1995 as a new sentencing option for low-level drug offenders and parole violators who previously would have been sent to a traditional prison. The Willard program was created as an intermediate sanction to deal with the problem of relapse. In Preen's case, an order of protection was also issued. She was convicted of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony.

Chad Main, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to five years probation, driver’s license revocation, ignition interlock device imposed, a $1,500 fine, and 250 hours of community service. He was convicted of driving while intoxicated as a Class E felony.

Eugene Matteson, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, was in court for a modification of a condition discharge. It has been extended to May 4, 2019.

Monday, July 24, 2017 at 11:04 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Attica, Warsaw.
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   Dominick F. Coffer

New York State Police, Warsaw, arrested prison inmate Dominick F. Coffer July 19 for the attempted murder of a fellow inmate April 22.

Coffer, 21, currently housed at Southport Correctional Facility, Pine City, was charged with: attempted murder in the second degree; assault in the first degree; criminal possession of a weapon in the third degree; and promoting prison contraband in the first degree. All are felonies.

He is accused of attacking another inmate while housed in Attica Correctional Facility, Attica.

State Police say the victim suffered numerous stab wounds and was hospitalized for multiple injuries including a right side "hemopneumothorax with a pigtail placement." Hemopneumothorax is a combination of two conditions: pneumothorax – air in the chest cavity, and hemothorax – blood in the chest cavity. The condition happens when the chest wall is punctured. Due to the nature of the victim's injuries, the pigtail placement, or small-bore chest tubes, were used to drain the lungs.

Coffer was arraigned in Wyoming County Court and returned to the custody of NYSDOCCS (New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision).

He is due in Wyoming County Court at a later date.

Coffer is currently serving a sentence for criminal possession of a weapon in the second degree out of Dutchess County.

Thursday, July 13, 2017 at 1:35 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, weather, flood, Attica, news.

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Tonawanda Creek couldn’t hold the deluge of rain this morning, subsequently forcing the closure of Dunbar Road between Route 98 and Exchange Road in Attica due to flooding.

According to two local residents, the areas just west of, and on both sides of, the bridge on Dunbar are a farmer’s fields, which were recently planted.

Currently, the Village park is under water and crews are clearing the debris left on Main Street from earlier flooding.

UPDATE 2:27 p.m.: The National Weather Service has extended the flood warning until 8 p.m. for Northern Wyoming and Livingston, Northeastern Erie, Southern Orleans and Niagara counties. Local law enforcement has reported widespread flooding throughout the region, including the closure of many roads due to high water, debris or washouts. 

While the heavy rain has ended, it will take some time for the water to recede across the area, weather officials say.

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Tonawanda Creek on Dunbar Road.

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The above two photos are taken on Exchange Road.

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The above three photos are at Attica Village Park.

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Dunbar Road off Route 238

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Tonawanda Creek

Sunday, July 9, 2017 at 10:44 pm

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Press release

The New York State Police in Warsaw, along with the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office and Wyoming County District Attorney’s Office are investigating a fatal motor-vehicle accident that occurred earlier today on Route 20A in the Town of Orangeville.

At approximately 11:45 a.m., a vehicle being driven by Joshua D. Huntress, of Mayville, was traveling west on Route 20A when he crossed into the eastbound lane and struck two oncoming motorcycles, each with a passenger.

One of the motorcycle passengers, Tomasa Martinez, 66, of North Tonanwanda, was taken to Wyoming County Community Hospital where she succumbed to her injuries. The three other bikers were transported to Erie County Medical Center, Buffalo, where they are being treated for their injuries.

The investigation is ongoing and charges are pending against Huntress.

See related: Fatal accident temporarily shut down Route 20A in Orangeville

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Sunday, July 9, 2017 at 4:56 pm

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An accident involving two motorcycles and a car shut down Route 20A at Route 98 in Orangeville for approximately four hours this afternoon.

New York State Troopers say a sedan traveling westbound on Route 20A crossed over the centerline of traffic and struck two motorcycles headed east. Of the five people involved in the collision, four were on motorcycles.

Two people were taken via Mercy Flight and one via North Java Ambulance to ECMC in Buffalo. Two others were taken via Warsaw Ambulance to Wyoming County Community Hospital, where one person died as a result of their injuries.

Assisting State Police on the scene included the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Department, Varysburg Fire Department, Attica Ambulance, and Warsaw and North Java ambulance and traffic control. Wyoming Fire Department also provided aid as they were coming from the Jam in the Valley event at Buffalo Hill, Varysburg.

The investigation into the accident is ongoing.

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Monday, July 3, 2017 at 4:51 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Business, Attica, health.

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When Ryan LaVarnway was a child, 2 Market St., Attica, was Jim’s Deli and a general store. On Friday the Wyoming County Chamber of Commerce welcomed LaVarnway, owner of Attica Pharmacy, to the address with a ribbon-cutting ceremony.

Local dignitaries, family and friends gathered at the corner of Market and Main streets to celebrate the official opening of Attica’s new independent pharmacy. The last time residents of the village and surrounding town had the option of pharmacies was in 1996 when Burling Drug closed its doors. 

“I had worked for Walgreens for 15 years and decided I didn’t want to be a staff pharmacist,” LaVarnway said. “I didn’t want to have to uproot my family to move up the corporate ladder.”

So, about four years ago he opened up his first pharmacy in Hamburg – a purchase he made from David Brooks. 

“Before I bought Brooks’ I thought about opening the pharmacy here, in this same building I’m in now, but it wasn’t doable at the time. But the real cool coincidence was in buying the store in Hamburg, the Brooks family used to live in this area.” 

The brick building that sits kitty-corner from the pharmacy was called the Duoform Company – a manufacturer of home remedies and medicines during the 1800s. David’s grandfather, Sewell Brooks, built the building. David’s father, Chester, was a pharmacist at a shop in the village. Sometime during the 1940s Chester moved his family to Hamburg to open up his own store – Brooks Pharmacy.

During the 1970s, David had taken over the pharmacy and in 2013 sold it to LaVarnway. While he still owns the shop in Hamburg, a couple of years ago he felt he could finally take the leap of bringing an independent pharmacy back to Attica. But he had a lot of work to accomplish first. 

“It’s totally different starting from new. There is a lot more involved in the process of starting a business from scratch.”

Licensing had to be obtained, a computer system needed to be installed and the building itself needed a bit of work.

“The building was a bank in the '60s and then sold to a store owner who had moved the door a few feet to the right, more in the center of the space. I wanted to make the front look like the old bank building.”

He not only renovated the interior, he restored the entrance back to its original facade – projects that were almost a year in the making. He also retained all the original woodwork and even repurposed an old door that he found in the basement that was labeled for the employee lunch room.

“This is my hometown. I saw a big need. The community hadn’t had a choice in pharmacies for 20-plus years. It’s a great community to open up in. To have done it on my own is rewarding, but the best part is seeing the people come in and the positive response of the customers.”

Attica Pharmacy leans toward a more traditional pharmacy in the sense that it sells prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications and medical equipment. The shop has five employees: three pharmacists, of which LaVarnway is one, and a couple of part-time employees. 

The store is open from 9 a.m.  to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays. For information call (585) 591-1111.

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Friday, June 30, 2017 at 6:35 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Arcade, Attica, Bennington, Castile, Warsaw.

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun June 29.

Phillip Goodwill, who is accused of a crime in Arcade, pled not guilty to: criminal possession of precursors of methamphetamine in the third degree, a Class D felony; aggravated unlicensed operation in the first degree, a Class E felony; criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree; and driving while ability impaired by drugs. The case has been adjourned to Aug. 31 for motions. Bail is continued at $10,000 bond.

Darren Tingue, who is accused of a crime in Arcade, pled not guilty to criminal possession of precursors of methamphetamine in the third degree, a Class D felony; and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree, a Class A misdemeanor. Motions are scheduled Aug. 31. Bail is continued at $10,000 cash and $50,000 bond.

Edward Gauthier, who committed a crime in Arcade, was sentenced to one year in jail and fees and surcharges on the conviction of aggravated family offense, a Class E felony. An eight-year order of protection was also issued.

Shawna Martino, who committed a crime in Attica, was sentenced to five years probation and fined $588. She is also responsible for fees and surcharges. Martino was convicted of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class D felony, and aggravated unlicensed operation in the second degree, a Class A misdemeanor. 

Cory Dahl, who is accused of a crime in Bennington and Castile, pled not guilty to criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fourth degree, a Class C felony, and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class D felony. Motions are scheduled Aug. 31.

Melissa Preen, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony. Sentencing is scheduled July 20.

Matthew Kurtz, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced on the conviction of criminal sale of marijuana in the second degree, a Class E felony, to five years probation, fees and surcharges.

Rachel Lafferty, who is accused of a committing a crime in Warsaw, had her case adjourned to July 12.

Thomas Grinnell, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, admitted to a violation of probation. Probation was revoked and he was resentenced to six months in jail.

Friday, June 30, 2017 at 1:23 pm
posted by Billie Owens in weather, Attica, Bennington, Covington, Wyoming, Wyoming County.

A Special Weather Statement issued a couple of minutes ago by the National Weather Service says: "An area of strong thunderstorms will bring torrential rains to Northern Wyoming and Southern Genesee counties. 

"Strong thunderstorms were clustered near Attica, or eight miles south of Batavia, moving east at 15 mph.

"These storms will bring very heavy rainfall to Attica and nearby locations with more than an inch of rain possible in an hour or less. Locations impacted include... Darien Lakes State Park, Le Roy, Bennington, Attica, Pavilion, Stafford, Covington, Alexander, Wyoming and East Bethany. This includes Interstate 90 near exit 47. Torrential rainfall is also occurring with this storm, and may cause localized flooding. Do not drive your vehicle through flooded roadways."

These conditions are expected until 2 p.m.

Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at 7:59 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Attica, law enforcement.

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The State of New York takes great pride in recognizing those individuals who have distinguished themselves professionally by substantially contributing to the safety and well-being of their community, read Assemblyman David DiPietro from a proclamation earlier today in Attica. Three Attica Police officers were recognized by DiPietro for their actions on three different dates that saved the lives of three fellow village residents. 

In recognition of their heroic actions, Attica Police Chief Dean Hendershott recommended the officers for the Medal of Valor award – one of the highest awards of service for the Department. Although the awards were given to the officers earlier this year in a ceremony held in the Village office, DiPietro says he personally wanted to recognize the two men and one woman.

On the evening of Oct. 23, Officer Stephanie A. Ingles, an eight-year veteran of the Attica PD, responded to a reported unresponsive individual with a suspected drug overdose. She was on the scene in under a minute and was advised that CPR instructions were being conveyed over the phone to a person inside the home.

At great personal risk to herself without backup available, the proclamation stated, she grabbed her CPR equipment and located the victim unresponsive on the kitchen floor. 

Ingles continued CPR and assisted the Attica Fire Department and EMS when they arrived to use the AED (Automated External Defibrillator) and administer Naloxone to revive the victim. 

If not for her swift response and quick thinking, the victim would not be alive today, read DiPietro. This victim is incredibly grateful for the efforts of Ingles to save his life, he continued.

James E. Prusak Jr. joined the Attica PD 18 months ago. On the evening of May 13, 2016, he was beginning his overnight patrol shift when he received a dispatch call reporting an individual attempting suicide after a domestic dispute. He began a search for the subject and upon locating the person, discovered he was not breathing. He called for EMS assistance and successfully administered CPR, which allowed the victim to begin breathing on his own before EMS arrived. 

Karl E. Zufall, a two-year veteran of the Attica PD, received word of an urgent dispatch call for EMS assistance Sept. 4 for a severe leg laceration. Although outside of his patrol jurisdiction, he responded to the location to render additional assistance, given the severity of the injury. 

When he arrived on scene, he found an elderly man lying on the steps of his garage – a trailer hitch fell from his vehicle, causing the severe laceration and heavy bleeding. Zufall applied a pressure dressing to attempt to stem the bleeding. When the victim stopped breathing, he carried the man down the stairs and administered CPR. The victim began breathing on his own and was taken to Wyoming County Community Hospital. 

Although the gentleman succumbed to his injuries a week later, the swift response and quick thinking of Zufall saved his life that day, giving the victim’s family members an opportunity to be with him to say goodbye when the time came, DiPietro said.

“All three officers embody the true calling of a rural police officer who is ready at a moment's notice to come to the assistance of community residents.”

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