Attica

Tuesday, June 27, 2017 at 7:59 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Attica, law enforcement.

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The State of New York takes great pride in recognizing those individuals who have distinguished themselves professionally by substantially contributing to the safety and well-being of their community, read Assemblyman David DiPietro from a proclamation earlier today in Attica. Three Attica Police officers were recognized by DiPietro for their actions on three different dates that saved the lives of three fellow village residents. 

In recognition of their heroic actions, Attica Police Chief Dean Hendershott recommended the officers for the Medal of Valor award – one of the highest awards of service for the Department. Although the awards were given to the officers earlier this year in a ceremony held in the Village office, DiPietro says he personally wanted to recognize the two men and one woman.

On the evening of Oct. 23, Officer Stephanie A. Ingles, an eight-year veteran of the Attica PD, responded to a reported unresponsive individual with a suspected drug overdose. She was on the scene in under a minute and was advised that CPR instructions were being conveyed over the phone to a person inside the home.

At great personal risk to herself without backup available, the proclamation stated, she grabbed her CPR equipment and located the victim unresponsive on the kitchen floor. 

Ingles continued CPR and assisted the Attica Fire Department and EMS when they arrived to use the AED (Automated External Defibrillator) and administer Naloxone to revive the victim. 

If not for her swift response and quick thinking, the victim would not be alive today, read DiPietro. This victim is incredibly grateful for the efforts of Ingles to save his life, he continued.

James E. Prusak Jr. joined the Attica PD 18 months ago. On the evening of May 13, 2016, he was beginning his overnight patrol shift when he received a dispatch call reporting an individual attempting suicide after a domestic dispute. He began a search for the subject and upon locating the person, discovered he was not breathing. He called for EMS assistance and successfully administered CPR, which allowed the victim to begin breathing on his own before EMS arrived. 

Karl E. Zufall, a two-year veteran of the Attica PD, received word of an urgent dispatch call for EMS assistance Sept. 4 for a severe leg laceration. Although outside of his patrol jurisdiction, he responded to the location to render additional assistance, given the severity of the injury. 

When he arrived on scene, he found an elderly man lying on the steps of his garage – a trailer hitch fell from his vehicle, causing the severe laceration and heavy bleeding. Zufall applied a pressure dressing to attempt to stem the bleeding. When the victim stopped breathing, he carried the man down the stairs and administered CPR. The victim began breathing on his own and was taken to Wyoming County Community Hospital. 

Although the gentleman succumbed to his injuries a week later, the swift response and quick thinking of Zufall saved his life that day, giving the victim’s family members an opportunity to be with him to say goodbye when the time came, DiPietro said.

“All three officers embody the true calling of a rural police officer who is ready at a moment's notice to come to the assistance of community residents.”

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Friday, June 23, 2017 at 1:57 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Attica, Warsaw, Bennington.

The following are from State Correctional Facilities and were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun June 21.

Pablo Sanes was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison on the conviction of attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony. The sentence is to run consecutively to his current term. He is also responsible for all fees and surcharges incurred.

Wesley Kirkland was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison on the conviction of attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony. The sentence is to run consecutively to his current term. He is also responsible for all fees and surcharges incurred.

Jamal Wilson was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison on the conviction of attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony. The sentence is to run consecutively to his current term. 

Chester Jones was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison as a second felony offender on the conviction of attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony. 

Jonathan Smith was sentenced to one-and-one-half years in prison and one year post-release supervision on the conviction of attempted criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class E felony. 

Billy Ray Staton was sentenced to one-and-one-half years in prison and one year post-release supervision on the conviction of attempted criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class E felony. He is also responsible for all surcharges incurred.

Michael Busgith had his case adjourned for a bench trial Sept. 5 and 6.

The following were in court before Mohun June 22.

Kimberly Gillard, who committed a crime in Attica, was sentenced to five years probation and fees and surcharges on the conviction of promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony.

Thomas McCabe, who is accused of a crime in Bennington, was in court for motions. The case has been adjourned to July 6 for a Huntley/Mapp Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant. A Mapp Hearing deals with the admissibility of physical evidence obtained by the police as a result of an illegal search. When there is a violation of the defendant’s constitutional rights regarding the seizure of the defendant’s physical evidence, the evidence may be suppressed.

Alex Drake, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to failure to register as a sex offender, a Class E felony. He was sentenced to one year in jail. He was also sentenced to one year in jail on a violation of probation conviction. The sentences are to run concurrently.

James Otis, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to five years probation on the conviction of criminal contempt in the first degree, a Class E felony. An order of protection was also issued and the Court ordered Otis to attend a Domestic Violence Victim Impact Panel. He is also responsible for all fees and surcharges incurred.

Tyler Tones, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to a three-year conditional discharge on the conviction of failure to register as a sex offender, a Class E felony. He is also responsible for all fees and surcharges incurred.

Shaquor Smith Sr., who is an inmate in a State Correctional Facility, was in court for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant. The case has been adjourned to July 19.

Thursday, June 22, 2017 at 2:47 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Attica, Bennington.

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(Photos submitted.)

Each year Flag Day (June 14) is celebrated in the Attica Village Park by Boy Scout Troop 474, out of Bennington. This year they were joined by members from Troop 650, Troop 60, Troop 618 and Cub Scout Pack 260, and by American Legion Harder-O’Donnell Post 734.

The boys collected old tattered and worn flags throughout the year at various locations. Then on Flag Day, with the American Legion's support, they retire them.

When the United States flag (Old Glory) becomes worn, torn, faded or badly soiled, it is time to replace it with a new flag, and the old flag should be retired. The traditional method of retirement is to incinerate the flag, but this does not mean that one should simply drop the entire flag (intact) into a fire.

The U.S. flag should be treated with respect when it’s flying, and it should be treated with respect when it’s being retired, Scout officials say. 

The American Creed states: It is my duty to my country to love it, to respect its Constitution, to obey its laws, to respect its flag, and to defend it against all enemies.

A flag ceases to be a flag when it is cut into pieces. Upon retirement, the flag is cut into four pieces: three red- and white-striped banners and the blue-star field. The blue field is left intact because no one should ever let the Union be broken. 

During the ceremony, the Scouts recited the following lines:

The U.S. flag is more than just some brightly colored cloth. It is a symbol of our nation. Seven red stripes and six white strips; together they represent the original 13 colonies that gained us liberty. 

The red stripes remind us of the lifeblood of brave men and women who were ready to die for this, their country. 

The white stripes remind us of purity and cleanliness of purpose, thought, word and deed. 

The blue is for truth and justice, like the eternal blue of the star-filled heavens. 

The stars represent the fifty sovereign states of our union. 

The Scouts maintained a vigil over the fire until no traces of the flag remnants remained. Then the ashes were collected and buried.

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Wednesday, June 21, 2017 at 2:58 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Attica.
Event Date and Time: 
June 24, 2017 -
12:00pm to 5:00pm
Run for Faith Barrel Race fundraiser to benefit Gateway Home, Main Street, Attica, will be held at Twin Ponds Ranch, 10755 Sandpit Road, Alexander, from noon to 5 p.m. June 24.
Events include barrel racing, horse rides, cattle sorting on foot, hay rides, face painting and more. There will also be a chicken barbecue and a food stand.
For more information visit www.gatewayhomeattica.org or call (585) 343-1042.
 
Monday, June 19, 2017 at 6:35 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Attica.
Event Date and Time: 
June 21, 2017 - 6:30pm

Persons diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia will undergo changes in the brain that will affect their ability to communicate, including limiting the ability to speak. The Alzheimer’s Association Western New York Chapter is offering a free educational program aimed at helping bridge the communication gap that is inevitable as the disease progresses at 6:30 p.m. June 21 at Stevens Memorial Library 146 Main St., Attica.

Monday, June 19, 2017 at 5:53 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Arcade, Castile, Warsaw, Attica, Eagle.

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun June 15.

Cheleena Green, who committed a crime in Arcade, was sentenced to one year definite jail time and restitution of $1,170.39. Additionally, a stay-away order of protection was issued. She was convicted of assault in the second degree, a Class D felony. A determinate/definite sentence is a jail or prison sentence that has a defined length and can't be changed by a parole board or other agency.

Mason Maha, who committed a crime in Castile, was sentenced to six months in jail, five years probation, and $525 restitution.

John Sprague, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to failure to register as a sex offender, a Class E felony, and forcible touching, a Class A misdemeanor. Sentencing is scheduled Aug. 3. Bail remained at $5,000 cash or $10,000 bond. 

James Smith, an inmate in a State Correctional Facility, was sentenced to nine months interim probation on the conviction of promoting prison contraband in the first degree. The case has been adjourned to March 8.

The following was in court June 16.

Robin Jones, who committed a crime in Attica, was sentenced to five years probation, and surcharges and fees on the conviction of promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony. 

The following were in court June 19.

Marie Giambra, who is accused of a crime in Eagle, had her case adjourned to June 26 for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Michael Williams Jr., who committed a crime in Wyoming County, admitted to a violation of probation. He was resentenced to four weekends in jail, one-year conditional discharge and is required to have an ignition interlock device, and probation was revoked. 

The following are from State Correctional Facilities.

Rance Dreher pled guilty to promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled Aug. 16.

Anthony Placido was granted by the Court to have his count severed from his co-defendants’ cases. His case is adjourned to July 19.

Devante Spencer had his case adjourned to July 12.

Keith Tyson pled guilty to attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled Sept. 20.

Thursday, June 15, 2017 at 4:50 pm
posted by Billie Owens in Sports, softball, GCC, Perry, Attica.

Press release:

The Genesee Community College softball program announced several additions to its recruiting class, signing seven local student athletes to letters of intent.

Grace Zandrowicz (Attica), Tatiana Draper (Elba), Mikayla Bush (Perry), Kennedy Lampart (Batavia), Samantha Tatarski (Pembroke), Katie Haefele (Pembroke) and Jaclyn Guzdek (Oakfield) will all join the Cougars beginning in the fall after recently committing to Genesee.

Tatarski earned a place on this spring's All-Genesee Region All-Star team and helped lead the Pembroke High School softball team to the sectional semifinals. She won 11 games on the mound and batted over .400 for the Dragons. Fellow Dragon Haefele will add to Genesee's corner infield, joining the Cougars as a third baseman after a season that garnered her All-GR Honorable Mention.

Guzdek, Draper and Zandrowicz were also named All-GR Honorable mention and will bolster the GCC offense and defense. Guzdek, also committed to the Genesee CC women's soccer program, played shortstop for Oakfield-Alabama High School on the diamond and goalkeeper on the pitch. Draper joins the Cougars outfield after playing right field for Elba's sectional championship team this spring and Zandrowicz, who was a member of the Attica High School volleyball team, played third base for the Blue Devils.

Bush was selected an All-Livingston County Athletic Association (LCAA) Division III All-Star as a catcher for Perry High School and also participated in the Exceptional Senior girls soccer game. Fellow catcher Kennedy Lampart will join GCC after helping the Batavia High School softball team to the sectional finals and 12 wins this spring.

Genesee graduates five sophomores from a team that advanced to the Region III-A Finals series this spring. The Cougars won 19 games and set the school record for most home runs (23) in a season and tied the mark for most doubles (66).

Genesee Community College athletics program endeavors to provide a quality and competitive intercollegiate athletics program consistent with the National Junior Collegiate Athletics Association (NJCAA) philosophy and the overall educational mission of Genesee Community College. Participation in collegiate athletics should be an extension of the total educational experience for the student athlete. The inherent philosophy emphasizes the athletic setting as a classroom used to teach character, commitment, work ethic, respect for differences, and the importance of sacrifice, teamwork, and cooperation.

For further information and pictures go to Genesee's Athletic webpage, which is updated regularly with game results, team rosters, photographs and information about Genesee's overall athletic program.  http://www.geneseeathletics.com.

Friday, June 9, 2017 at 3:23 pm

Public Health Column from the Wyoming County Health Department:

Do you know that mammals, including humans, can contract rabies? Bats, raccoons, foxes and skunks are assumed to be infected with this deadly virus and must be avoided. In any case with animals, it is better to love your own and leave others alone!

What is rabies? How is it transmitted? What are Signs & Symptoms?

Rabies is a virus that attacks the nervous system of mammals, ultimately causing disease in the brain and death. There are more than 4,000 different species of mammals, all of which are vertebrates (they have a backbone or spine), are endothermic (“warm-blooded”), have hair on their bodies, and produce milk to feed their babies.

Transmission of the rabies virus usually begins when the saliva of an infected host is passed to an uninfected mammal. The most common way rabies is transmitted is through the bite and virus-containing saliva of an infected host. Other routes include contamination of mucous membranes (i.e., eyes, nose, mouth), aerosol transmission, and organ transplantations.

The first symptoms of rabies may be very similar to those of the flu including general weakness or discomfort, fever or headache. These symptoms may last for days. There may also be discomfort or a prickling or itching sensation at the bite site, progressing within days to symptoms of cerebral (brain) dysfunction, anxiety, confusion, agitation.

As the disease progresses, the person may experience delirium, abnormal behavior, hallucinations and insomnia. Common signs of rabies in animals are; nocturnal (night) animals active during daylight, foaming of the mouth, overly aggressive, or uncoordinated. The acute period of disease typically ends after 2 to 10 days.  Once clinical signs of rabies appear, the disease is nearly always fatal, and treatment is typically supportive.

What to do if potentially exposed to rabies?

“If you are bitten, or if infectious material (such as saliva) from a wild or stray animal gets into your eyes, nose, mouth, or a cut, wash the area with soap/water and call your doctor or local County Health Department immediately. Please note that bats have very tiny, razor-sharp teeth so you may not feel or see a bite mark,” said Sarah Balduf, director of Environmental Health for Genesee & Orleans Counties.

IT IS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT to safely capture the suspect animal if it has or may have been in contact with people, pets or livestock so it can be tested for rabies. Capturing the suspect animal for testing is important because unnecessary medical treatment to people and confinement of pets or livestock may be avoidable.

“To diagnosis the rabies virus in animals testing the tissue of the brain is needed. Keep this in mind when capturing the animal because damage to the head/brain can cause it to be untestable. If treatment is recommended, it consists of a series of four shots, over a period of 14 days. An additional fifth dose of rabies vaccine is given on day 28 to immunocompromised patients (less capable of battling infections),” Balduf said.

*A link to a video on how to safely capture a bat is located below.

How do you to prevent rabies? 

Rabies is 100-percent preventable! Here are some ways to protect your families and animals.

·      Don't feed, touch or adopt wild animals, stray dogs or cats, including the babies.

·      Be sure your pet dogs, cats and ferrets as well as horses and valuable livestock animals are up-to-date on their rabies vaccinations. Vaccination protects pets if they are exposed to rabid animals. Pets too young to be vaccinated (under 3 months old) should be kept indoors and allowed outside only under direct observation.  Keep family pets indoors at night. Do not leave them outside unattended or let them roam free.

·      Do not attract wild animals to your home or yard. Keep your property free of stored bird seed or other foods that may attract wild animals. Feed pets indoors.  Tightly cap or put away garbage cans. Board up any openings to your attic, basement, porch or garage. Cap your chimney with screens. Bats can get in spaces as small as the width of a pencil.

·      If nuisance wild animals are living in parts of your home, consult with a nuisance wildlife control expert about having them removed. You can find wildlife control experts, who work on a fee-for-service basis, in your telephone directory under pest control.

·      Teach children not to touch any animal they do not know and to tell an adult immediately if they are bitten by any animal.

·      If a wild animal is on your property, let it wander away. Bring children and pets indoors and alert neighbors who are outside. You may contact a nuisance wildlife control expert who will remove the animal for a fee.

Upcoming Dog, Cat and Ferret Anti-Rabies Vaccination Clinics:

Clinics are free to county residents -- charges may apply for out of county residents.

Donations are appreciated -- for complete details visit the county health department’s website.

Wyoming County Clinics are held on the following dates and times:

*Registrations are not accepted the last 15 minutes.

  • Thursday, June 15th from 6 – 8 p.m., Arcade Town Highway Department, 7340 Route 98
  • Wednesday, July 19th from 6 – 8 p.m., Attica Town Highway Department, 700 Route 98
  • Saturday, Oct. 14th from 9 – 11:30 a.m, Wyoming County Highway Department, 4328 Route 19, Rock Glen

For more information on rabies, how to catch a bat safely, and much more visit, https://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/communicable/zoonoses/rabies/

Monday, June 5, 2017 at 12:41 pm

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Friday’s fire on Devinney Road still remains under investigation.

The dispatch center received an emergency call around 3:30 p.m. June 2, about a house fire at 0 Devinney Road, Wethersfield, which was totally consumed by flames, say officials with Wyoming County Emergency Services.

Crews from North Java, Gainesville and Varysburg fire departments were on the scene for three hours putting out the blaze.

Fire Chief in Charge, North Java Assistant Fire Chief Brian Boorman was assisted at the scene by Emergency Services. Fire departments standing by at empty stations included Attica and Strykersville. 

There were no injuries reported.

The house and contents are deemed a total loss.

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Monday, June 5, 2017 at 11:49 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, crime, Warsaw, Perry, Attica.

The following were in Wyoming County Court June 1 before Judge Michael Mohun.

Christian Coffta, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to failure to register as a sex offender, a Class E felony. He was sentenced to a three-year conditional discharge and fees and surcharges.

Clifford Murch, who is accused of a crime in Perry, had his case adjourned to June 20 for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Patrick Gugliuzza, who is accused of a crime in Warsaw, had his case adjourned to June 22.

Michael Williams, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, was arraigned on a violation of probation charge. The case has been adjourned to June 19. He was released on his own recognizance.

Lindell Cox, an inmate in a State Correctional Facility in Attica, had his case adjourned to Aug. 16 for plea cut-off. A trial is scheduled Sept. 22.

Friday, June 2, 2017 at 5:56 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, fire, Gainesville, Java, Varysburg, Strykersville, Attica.

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A fire on Devinney Road in Gainesville broke out early this afternoon, sending crews from Gainesville, Java and Varysburg fire departments to the scene.

Standing by at empty stations included Attica and Strykersville fire departments. Wyoming County Emergency Services assisted on scene.

There were no injuries reported at the time of this post.

The cause of the fire is still under investigation.

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Thursday, June 1, 2017 at 3:40 pm
posted by Billie Owens in FFA, Warsaw, Attica.

Press release:

Thirteen Batavia Career and Technical Education (CTE) Center students represented the Western Region at the New York State FFA Convention in Leadership Development Events in May at the State University of New York at Morrisville. Five of them reside in Wyoming County.

Melissa Keller (Pembroke) placed second in the Employment Skills event and will represent New York State at the Big E Fair next fall in Massachusetts. This event is the Eastern States Exposition Fair where students from throughout the Northeastern United States come to compete. Melissa earned a $1,500 national FFA scholarship called the America’s Farms Grow Ag Leaders/Monsanto Fund.

The team of Melissa Keller, Cole Hudson (Notre Dame) and Cherie Glosser (Warsaw), placed third in the Marketing Plan event. Four students, Rebecca Semmel (Warsaw), Stella Glosser (Warsaw), Sarah Lippert (Attica), and Elizabeth Jurs (Elba), competed as the Food Science team and placed ninth out of 27 teams.

Allison Pajda (Attica) placed sixth in the People in Agriculture event.

The Batavia CTE Center FFA program focuses on leadership, personal growth and career success. The co-advisors are Richardson and Holly Partridge, Animal Science instructor.

If you know of a current junior or underclassman who is interested in business or agriculture, or is unsure of a career path, applications are now being accepted for the Agri-Business Academy at the Genesee Valley Educational Partnership. The Agri-Business Academy is a one-year partnership program between the Partnership and Genesee Community College. This college prep program is geared toward highly motivated high school seniors interested in investigating careers in the agribusiness field.

Through the Agri-Business Academy, students explore the many career opportunities available to them — locally, internationally or often it is a dynamic blend of both. Students can also earn 15 college credits through the ACE program at Genesee Community College.

Applications are available at http://www.genesee.edu/home/ace/career-pathways/agri-business-academy/. Any questions can be directed to Richardson at (585) 344-7783 or kirchardson3@gvboces.org.

The Batavia Career and Technical Education Center is a program of the Genesee Valley Educational Partnership. The Partnership operates as a Board of Cooperative Educational Services offering shared programs and services to 22 component school districts located in Genesee, Wyoming, Livingston and Steuben counties in New York State.

Thursday, June 1, 2017 at 3:32 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Attica, healthcare.
Event Date and Time: 
June 10, 2017 - 9:00am

Gateway Home Board of Directors Member Jeff Clark is going to jail June 10. 

Well, he’s not going to a real jail, but he will be held in a temporary jail as a fund raising event for Gateway Home in Attica.

The event, an all day happening, will be held at Louie’s Lounge, 38 Market St., Attica. Food and drinks will be available and raffles and live auctions will also be held.

For more information about the organization or to make a donation, visit GatewayHomeAttica.org and click on the donate button. ​

Thursday, June 1, 2017 at 3:28 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, healthcare, Attica, Business.

Gateway Home Board of Directors Member Jeff Clark is going to jail June 10. 

Well, he’s not going to a real jail, but he will be held in a temporary jail as a fund-raising event for Gateway Home in Attica.

The event, which runs from 1 to 6 p.m., will be held at Louie’s Lounge, 38 Market St., Attica. Food and drinks will be available and raffles and live auctions will also be held.

Gateway Home is a comfort care facility for the terminally ill, with three months or less to live. Admittance is based on need and age is not a factor. Additionally, residents are not charged for services, nor does the home accept insurance.

“Gateway home is a nonprofit organization that provides this care 24-hours-a-day, seven-days-a-week,” Clark said. “It is staffed by professional medical personnel and they are aided by trained volunteers. The care and the operation of Gateway Home, on Main Street in the Village, is provided by the support of our community. Funding is from donations, bequeaths, capital fund raising, and grants.”

For more information about the organization or to make a donation, visit GatewayHomeAttica.org and click on the donate button. 

See related: Gateway Home to provide comfort care for terminally ill patients

Thursday, June 1, 2017 at 1:23 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, Attica, education.

Thomas Finnigan, of Attica, recently received Second Prize, May 10, at the eighth annual Student Research Conference held in Cowles Hall at Elmira College, Elmira.

More than 40 students of the college, representing 10 disciplines and all class years, presented course projects and independent research conducted with faculty.

Cash prizes were awarded to standout papers in each of the research sessions and in each category of the poster sessions. The sessions included natural sciences, social sciences, and applied research.

The academic writing session was comprised of four exemplary papers selected for presentation from the freshmen writing courses.

Elmira College is a private, coeducational, Phi Beta Kappa college founded in 1855. The college has an undergraduate enrollment of approximately 1,200 full-time mostly-residential students, and is the guardian of Quarry Farms where Mark Twain summered for decades. Many of his most iconic novels were written there and is today a research center for visiting Twain scholars. Elmira has been ranked as a Best College in the Northeast by the Princeton Review and a Top Tier national liberal arts college by U.S. News & World Report, which also ranked Elmira College as a leading college, nationally, for student internships. The Philadelphia Inquirer cited the Elmira College campus as “picture postcard perfect.”

Wednesday, May 31, 2017 at 7:40 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, Attica, education.

Emily Cayea, of Attica, was named to the spring 2017 dean’s list at SUNY Oneonta (State University of New York). She was among 1,409 students who earned a grade point average of 3.5 or higher while carrying a course load of 12 or more hours.

SUNY Oneonta, a liberal arts college, enrolls 6,000 students in its 60 undergraduate and 14 graduate programs. The college has been named to Kiplinger's list of "100 Best Values in Public Colleges" for 10 years running and sits at No. 12 on the 2017 U.S. News and World Report list of the best public institutions in the region. 

Wednesday, May 31, 2017 at 7:00 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, crime, Warsaw, Attica.

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun May 26.

Rebecca Reding, who is accused of a crime in Warsaw, pled not guilty to welfare fraud in the third degree and grand larceny in the third degree, both are Class D felonies; and four counts of offering a false instrument for filing in the first degree, all as Class E felonies. The case has been adjourned to July 20.

The following are from State Correctional facilities in Attica.

Rance Dreher was in court for motions. A Huntley Hearing is scheduled June 19. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Sean Barnhill was in court for motions. The case has been adjourned to June 26.

Devante Spencer was in court for motions. A Huntley Hearing is scheduled June 19.

Anthony Placido had his case adjourned to June 19 for motions.

Keith Tyson had his case adjourned to June 19.

Wednesday, May 31, 2017 at 6:56 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, Attica, Arcade, Castile, North Java.

Nazareth College graduate students earned their degrees May 14 at the 90th Annual Commencement ceremony at the Blue Cross Arena, Rochester.

    • Morgan Monahan earned a master's degree in occupational therapy and Mary White earned a doctoral degree in physical therapy. Both are residents of Arcade; and

    • Mcleana Schwab, of North Java, earned a doctoral degree in physical therapy.

Nazareth students named to the spring 2017 dean's list include: 

    • John Beyer, of Arcade, is majoring in psychology;

    • Katriel DeGolyer is majoring in English Lit Conc, inclusive education and Alexandra Scharet is majoring in social work. Both are residents of Castile; and 

    • McKenzie McLaughlin, of Attica, is majoring in psychology.

Nazareth College's offers 60 majors, including education, health and human services, management, the fine arts, music, theater, math and science, foreign languages, and the liberal arts. The coeducational college supports 2,000 undergrads and 800 graduate students. Nazareth is recognized nationally for its Fulbright global student scholars and commitment to civic engagement.

Wednesday, May 31, 2017 at 6:31 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, announcements, Warsaw, Perry, Attica, education.

Press release:

Assemblyman David DiPietro (R,C-East Aurora) announced a new round of funding for essential library repairs and upgrades within his district. 

In total, the New York State Education Department/New York State Library have approved 216 construction awards to public library systems in legislative districts throughout the state.

“These awards will go an incredibly long way in bringing our libraries up to legal code, rehabbing their appearances and keeping libraries at the center of our communities,” DiPietro said. “I will continue to fight for additional resources throughout the end of our legislative session to ensure our libraries receive their fair share of our tax dollars. We must continue to provide these vital resources to our community learning centers.”

Libraries to receive funding in the 147th District include:

    • Perry Public Library -- $10,807 to replace their existing air conditioning system;

    • Stevens Memorial Library in Attica -- $303,233 to upgrade the back entrance to be ADA compliant, and create a safer sidewalk doorway at the front entrance;

    • Warsaw Public Library -- $9,004 to improve access to both the elevator and fire alarm control panel; and

    • Boston Free Library -- $3,106 for interior and exterior rehab of their facilities.

There are approximately 1,000 public library buildings in communities across New York and more than half of them are more than 60 years old. Many are unable to accommodate users with disabilities, are energy inefficient and cannot provide Internet and computer technologies because of outdated and inadequate electrical wiring, officials say.

Project activities and expenditures eligible for grants from the State Aid for Library Construction Program include financing construction of new library buildings, construction of additions to existing buildings, and the renovation and/or rehabilitation of existing space.

In the 2017-18 State Budget, the Legislature provided $24 million for projects that will be announced in spring 2018.

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