Bennington

Friday, June 23, 2017 at 1:57 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Attica, Warsaw, Bennington.

The following are from State Correctional Facilities and were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun June 21.

Pablo Sanes was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison on the conviction of attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony. The sentence is to run consecutively to his current term. He is also responsible for all fees and surcharges incurred.

Wesley Kirkland was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison on the conviction of attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony. The sentence is to run consecutively to his current term. He is also responsible for all fees and surcharges incurred.

Jamal Wilson was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison on the conviction of attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony. The sentence is to run consecutively to his current term. 

Chester Jones was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison as a second felony offender on the conviction of attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony. 

Jonathan Smith was sentenced to one-and-one-half years in prison and one year post-release supervision on the conviction of attempted criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class E felony. 

Billy Ray Staton was sentenced to one-and-one-half years in prison and one year post-release supervision on the conviction of attempted criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class E felony. He is also responsible for all surcharges incurred.

Michael Busgith had his case adjourned for a bench trial Sept. 5 and 6.

The following were in court before Mohun June 22.

Kimberly Gillard, who committed a crime in Attica, was sentenced to five years probation and fees and surcharges on the conviction of promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony.

Thomas McCabe, who is accused of a crime in Bennington, was in court for motions. The case has been adjourned to July 6 for a Huntley/Mapp Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant. A Mapp Hearing deals with the admissibility of physical evidence obtained by the police as a result of an illegal search. When there is a violation of the defendant’s constitutional rights regarding the seizure of the defendant’s physical evidence, the evidence may be suppressed.

Alex Drake, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to failure to register as a sex offender, a Class E felony. He was sentenced to one year in jail. He was also sentenced to one year in jail on a violation of probation conviction. The sentences are to run concurrently.

James Otis, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to five years probation on the conviction of criminal contempt in the first degree, a Class E felony. An order of protection was also issued and the Court ordered Otis to attend a Domestic Violence Victim Impact Panel. He is also responsible for all fees and surcharges incurred.

Tyler Tones, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to a three-year conditional discharge on the conviction of failure to register as a sex offender, a Class E felony. He is also responsible for all fees and surcharges incurred.

Shaquor Smith Sr., who is an inmate in a State Correctional Facility, was in court for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant. The case has been adjourned to July 19.

Thursday, June 22, 2017 at 2:47 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Attica, Bennington.

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(Photos submitted.)

Each year Flag Day (June 14) is celebrated in the Attica Village Park by Boy Scout Troop 474, out of Bennington. This year they were joined by members from Troop 650, Troop 60, Troop 618 and Cub Scout Pack 260, and by American Legion Harder-O’Donnell Post 734.

The boys collected old tattered and worn flags throughout the year at various locations. Then on Flag Day, with the American Legion's support, they retire them.

When the United States flag (Old Glory) becomes worn, torn, faded or badly soiled, it is time to replace it with a new flag, and the old flag should be retired. The traditional method of retirement is to incinerate the flag, but this does not mean that one should simply drop the entire flag (intact) into a fire.

The U.S. flag should be treated with respect when it’s flying, and it should be treated with respect when it’s being retired, Scout officials say. 

The American Creed states: It is my duty to my country to love it, to respect its Constitution, to obey its laws, to respect its flag, and to defend it against all enemies.

A flag ceases to be a flag when it is cut into pieces. Upon retirement, the flag is cut into four pieces: three red- and white-striped banners and the blue-star field. The blue field is left intact because no one should ever let the Union be broken. 

During the ceremony, the Scouts recited the following lines:

The U.S. flag is more than just some brightly colored cloth. It is a symbol of our nation. Seven red stripes and six white strips; together they represent the original 13 colonies that gained us liberty. 

The red stripes remind us of the lifeblood of brave men and women who were ready to die for this, their country. 

The white stripes remind us of purity and cleanliness of purpose, thought, word and deed. 

The blue is for truth and justice, like the eternal blue of the star-filled heavens. 

The stars represent the fifty sovereign states of our union. 

The Scouts maintained a vigil over the fire until no traces of the flag remnants remained. Then the ashes were collected and buried.

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Friday, May 26, 2017 at 7:10 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Wyoming, Bennington.

Mary Goodenow, 79, of Wyoming, was charged May 24 with welfare fraud in the fourth degree and offering a false instrument to file in the first degree, both are felonies. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies arrested Goodenow after an investigation by the Sheriff’s Office and Department of Social Services allegedly revealed that she failed to report all income and other people living with her. She is accused of failing to report the income she was receiving for having two people living with her. Additionally, she is accused of not reporting that the men were even in the household. Deputies say, by failing to report her income, she received $8,205.80 in county taxpayer benefits to which  she was not entitled. She is due in the Town of Warsaw Court June 26.

Jenna R. Holly, 32, of Angelica, was charged May 24 with speed in zone, consumption of alcohol beverage/possession of an open container, driving while intoxicated, and DWI with BAC more than .08 percent. Holly was stopped for allegedly speeding on Route 77, Bennington. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say she had been drinking an alcoholic beverage in the vehicle. She was put through field sobriety testing and was subsequently arrested for DWI. She was taken to the Warsaw Police Department for a breath test. Holly is due in the Town of Bennington Court at a later date.

Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at 10:02 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Attica, Bennington.
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      Devon M. Ford

Devon M. Ford, 18, of Bennington, and a 17-year-old from Attica were both charged April 29 with burglary and criminal mischief following an incident in Perrysburg. The 17-year-old was also charged with unlawful possession of marijuana. 

Troopers responded to a 9-1-1 call of trespassers at the JN Adam Complex, Peck Hill Road, Saturday night. Responding troopers say they heard the teens inside the building breaking glass and damaging the building. The two boys allegedly fled the building, but were subsequently caught by the officers. 

The two were put in Cattaraugus County Jail in lieu of $1,000 cash bail or $2,000 bond.

Friday, April 28, 2017 at 6:15 pm

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun April 27.

Thomas McCabe III, who is accused of a crime in Bennington, pled not guilty to criminal possession of a controlled substance in the second degree, a Class A-II felony. Motions are scheduled June 22. Bail was set at $100,000 cash, bond or property.

Leah McCabe, who is accused of a crime in Bennington, pled not guilty to criminal possession of a controlled substance in the second degree, a Class A-II felony. Motions are scheduled June 22. Bail was set at $25,000 cash or $50,000 bond.

Lorenzo Eaton, who committed a crime in Arcade, was sentenced to five years probation on the conviction of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony. Restitution of $200 has also been paid.

Katrina Chandler, who committed a crime in Attica, pled guilty to forgery in the second degree, a Class D felony, and petit larceny. She was sentenced to one year interim probation. Restitution of $600 has been paid.

Serena Silvernail waived indictment on forgery in the second degree, a Class D felony, and grand larceny in the fourth degree, a Class E felony. Silvernail pled guilty to the lesser charge of petit larceny. She was sentenced at the discretion of the Court to a one-year conditional discharge. Restitution of $1,700 has been paid. An order of protection was issued.

Michael Marrale, who committed a crime in Attica, pled guilty to reckless endangerment in the first degree, a Class D felony, and driving while intoxicated, a Class E felony. An order of protection was issued and the case was adjourned to July 20 for sentencing.

Grayson Stock, who committed a crime in Attica, was sentenced to three years probation, a $1,000 fine, $20 in restitution, and 75 hours in community service. He was convicted of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree, a Class A misdemeanor.

John Townley, who committed a crime in Eagle, was sentenced to one year interim probation on the conviction of criminal mischief in the third degree, a Class E felony.

Clifford Murch, who is accused of a crime in Perry, had his case adjourned to Monday.

Sarah Ingalls, who is accused of a crime in Perry, had her case adjourned for Treatment Court. Formerly called Drug Court, Treatment Court not only handles those who have a drug problem, but also those with an alcohol or mental health problem. Other assistance involves aiding with health insurance issues – oftentimes a hurdle to gaining access to treatment – for outpatient or inpatient services.

Carl Vander, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to six months in jail, five years probation, $147.31 in restitution, and fees and surcharges. He was convicted of attempted assault in the second degree and attempted burglary in the third degree, both are Class E felonies. 

Chad Main, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to driving while intoxicated, a Class E felony. Sentencing is scheduled July 20.

Tyler Tones, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to failure to register as a sex offender, a Class E felony. Sentencing is scheduled June 22. He is held in Wyoming County Jail without bail.

Ryan McDanel, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to attempted criminal possession of a weapon in the third degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled July 20.

Jeffrey Snyder II, who committed a crime in Wethersfield, pled guilty to assault in the second degree, a Class D felony. He was sentenced to one year interim probation. An order of protection was left in place. Final sentencing is April 12.

Alex Drake, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, admitted to a violation of probation. Sentencing is scheduled June 22. He is held without bail in Wyoming County Jail.

Brandon McCoy, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, admitted to a violation of probation and was released back to probation. Final sentencing is Aug. 3.

The following are from State Correctional Facilities in Attica and were in Court before Mohun April 26 and 27. 

Jerry Gillard pled guilty to attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled May 17.

Jamal Wilson pled guilty to attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled June 21. Wilson waived appearance at sentencing.

James Smith had his case adjourned to May 3. He continues to be held without bail.

Billyray Staton pled guilty to attempted criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled June 21.

Jonathan Smith pled guilty to attempted criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled June 21.

Andrew Mott had his case adjourned to May 17.

Lindell Cox had his case adjourned to June 21 for an appearance. He is scheduled for trial July 7.

Benedict Agnostini had his case adjourned to June 21.

Patrick Hill was in court for a Huntley Hearing. The decision has been reserved. The case has been adjourned to May 17.  A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant. After the hearing of a trial or the argument of a motion a judge might not immediately deliver a decision, but instead take time to review evidence and the law and deliver a decision at a later time, usually in a written form, thus reserve decision.

Friday, March 31, 2017 at 8:28 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Boy Scouts, Bennington, Attica.

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When more than half the members of Boy Scout Troop 474 use the Stevens Memorial Library in Attica, it was a natural fit that one of their fundraising efforts benefit the local branch.

Earlier in March, the Bennington Troop hosted a spaghetti dinner, which raised $1,900 to go toward the construction projects at the library. Thursday evening, the boys presented Library Board Member Jeffrey Clark with the check at the Bennington Town Hall, Route 354, Bennington.

According to Clark, the boys approached Library Director Nancy Burns and asked about raising the funds because they “wanted to get involved.”

The Bennington Troop wanted to do something to help make the community aware that they are active and want to participate in community endeavors, says Troop 474 committee member Carl Kocsis. 

“We wanted help a community that wants to help us,” said Boy Scout Mason Hinze.

The boys chose a spaghetti dinner because they “wanted to raise money and we all like spaghetti,” says Boy Scout Joe Kubik.

“And,” said Boy Scout Eric Peters, “pasta is cheap and filling.”

With the help of local supporters, Tops Market in Attica, Little Sicily, Bennington Lanes, Twilight Meadows, O•AT•KA Butter, Upstate Co-Op Milk, the American Legion, Nino’s Pizzeria, and the SpotLight Theater in Warsaw, and Barilla, which donated the sauce and spaghetti, the boys held the feast at Saint Paul’s Church in Attica.

“It’s a wonderful thing the boys did,” Clark said. “We are awful glad for their support and participation. We like to think of the library as a place to not only find answers, but a place to ask questions too.”

When asked what the boys gained from the experience…without missing a beat, one of the boys patted his stomach, smiled and said “full bellies.”

For more information about Boy Scout Troop 474 click here

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Friday, March 17, 2017 at 2:54 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Castile, Covington, Attica, Bennington, Arcade, Eagle, Warsaw.

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun March 16.

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     Amy Goodenow

Amy Goodenow, who is accused of a crime in Castile, pled not guilty to arson in the third degree, a Class C felony, and criminal mischief in the second degree, a Class D felony. Motions are scheduled May 11. Bail continues at $5,000.

Justin Stanbro, who is accused of a crime in Arcade, had his case adjourned to April 13.

Cheleena Green, who committed a crime in Arcade, pled guilty to assault in the second degree, a Class D felony. The case has been adjourned to June 15 for sentencing. Green is held in the Wyoming County Jail without bail.

Robin Frontuto, who committed a crime in Attica, was sentenced to five years probation, plus fees and surcharges on the conviction of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class D felony.

Lonniqua Williams, who committed a crime in Attica, was sentenced to a one-year conditional discharge, plus fees and surcharges on the conviction of conspiracy in the fifth degree, a Class A misdemeanor. 

Spencer Bressette, who committed a crime in Bennington, pled guilty to criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class D felony. Bressette was sentenced to one year interim probation. Final sentencing is scheduled March 21, 2018.

Mason Maha, who committed a crime in Castile, pled guilty to attempted burglary in the third degree, a Class E felony. Released to the pretrial release program. Sentencing is scheduled June 15.

Aaron Gillard, who committed a crime in Covington, pled guilty to driving while intoxicated and aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the first degree, both are Class E felonies. He was sentenced to one-year interim probation and paid $577.03 in restitution. Final sentencing is scheduled March 1. 

Marie Giambra, who is accused of a crime in Eagle, pled not guilty to burglary in the second degree, a Class C felony, and grand larceny in the fourth degree, a Class E felony. A stay away order of protection was issued. Motions are scheduled May 11. 

Patrick Gugliuzza, who is accused of a crime in Warsaw, pled not guilty to: assault in the second degree, a Class D felony; resisting arrest and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree, both are Class A misdemeanors; and disorderly conduct, a violation. Motions are scheduled May 11. Bail was set at $50,000 cash or $100,000 bond.

The following are from State Correctional Facilities in Attica. 

Bail is set for state inmate cases for two reasons:

    • In the event that the inmates current sentence is overturned on appeal or the inmates sentence is about to expire the bail will kick in on the new case and the inmate would be turned over to the Wyoming County jail while the new case is pending; and

    • When bail is placed on an inmate it follows the inmate so when they are moved to different facilities it is one way for them to be found and also the state system knows there is another case still pending.

Jayme Frontuto is scheduled for sentencing April 27. He is held without bail.

Cesar Aguayo was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison as a second felony offender, plus fees and surcharges. He was convicted of attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony.

Yhury Marcelo pled not guilty to criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fourth degree, a Class C felony; promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony; and conspiracy in the fourth degree, a Class E felony. Motions are scheduled for today. Bail was set at $5,000.

Jerry Gillard had his case adjourned to April 12.

James Smith pled guilty to promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony. Interim sentencing is scheduled June 15.

Thursday, March 16, 2017 at 9:37 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Perry, Warsaw, Attica, Bennington.

Robert S. Starling, 60, Bayville, N.J., was charged March 12 with aggravated unlicensed operation in the third degree and operating a motor vehicle while using a portable electric device. Starling was charged following a traffic stop on Route 20A, Perry for an alleged cell phone violation. During the stop, deputies say Starling was found to have had his driving privileges suspended in New York State since 2001 for failure to answer a summons. He was put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $500 cash bail. He is due in the Town of Perry Court June 14.

John M. Chaplin, 36, of Attica, was charged March 15 with moved from lane unsafely, driving while intoxicated, driving with a BAC of .08 percent or more, and aggravated DWI with a BAC of .18 percent or more. The Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office received a report of a vehicle in a ditch on Sierk Road, Bennington. During the investigation, deputies say Chaplin said he drove off the road to avoid a deer. Further investigation allegedly revealed he was driving while intoxicated. He was taken to the Sheriff’s Office for a breath test. He is due in the Town of Bennington Court at a later date.

Wesley Goerss, 26, of Scottsville, was arrested March 15 on a Wyoming County Family Court Warrant. Deputies say Goerss turned himself in at the Village of Le Roy Police Department. Subsequently, he was brought back to Wyoming County and put in Wyoming County Jail on $500 cash bail. He is due in Wyoming County Family Court at a later date.

Tuesday, March 14, 2017 at 2:49 pm

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The Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office reports last week’s windstorm prompted approximately 700 calls to the 9-1-1 center between 11 a.m. to midnight March 8. In a span of three hours – from noon to 3 p.m. – dispatchers fielded 282 calls. 

The Communications Department maxed out its allowable staffing with three dispatchers on duty from 7 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., and four during the hours of 2:30 to 6 p.m.. By comparison, normal operations require just two, Sheriff Gregory Rudolph says.

With a mere six-second wait time on calls, dispatchers prioritized and coordinated the response of law enforcement, fire and highway departments, and multiple utility companies.

“Professional dispatching, strong teamwork from the public and private sectors, and the skilled volunteerism from the fire, EMS, and Red Cross communities, provided the finest in public safety amid the commotion of this daylong incident and its aftermath,” Rudolph said.

Rudolph reports the most severe damage was seen in the towns of Attica, Bennington, Covington, Java, Orangeville, Sheldon, and Wethersfield, and the Village of Attica. Some businesses and residents in those areas were without power until Monday. At the peak of the storm, more than 8,000 customers were without power in the county. 

While no injuries were reported related to the storm, four tractor-trailers blew over from the force of the wind, along with countless trees and approximately 50 utility poles throughout the county.

Law enforcement fielded 95 calls, with deputies responding to 52 calls for service and the village departments handling 43. The Attica Fire Department covered 12 of the 37 calls that came into the county’s fire departments. Additionally, Varysburg Fire Department was the site of the emergency shelter put in place from the evening of March 9 through the morning of March 11.

Members of the Bennington and Cowlesville fire companies, and the Pavilion Fire Department opened and manned their halls for afternoon and evening hours to use as warming shelters throughout the ordeal.

Finally, the county and town highway departments spent countless hours cutting and clearing tree debris from obstructed roadways.

Monday, March 13, 2017 at 10:07 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, weather, Bennington, Sheldon, Wethersfield, Attica.

As of this posting, NYSEG and National Grid report a combined total of approximately 25 to 30 customers are still without power.

According to their respective websites, the towns of Bennington, Sheldon, Wethersfield, and Attica are affected. 

While NYSEG is not showing an estimated time of restoration, National Grid anticipates electrical services to be restored around 10:45 a.m..

Friday, March 10, 2017 at 7:12 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, weather, news, Bennington, announcements.

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Photo from Bennington Fire Company.

A message from Bennington Fire Company, Clinton Street (Route 354), Bennington, as seen on their Facebook page:

"Our little helpers have been working hard and dinner is ready! Come on in, warm up and enjoy a hot meal. We will be here until 10 p.m.."

Thursday, March 9, 2017 at 6:43 am

High winds yesterday left thousands of residents without power. While power was restored to many customers, power companies report 6,350 residents are still without power as of 6:15 a.m..

RG&E customers without power: 

    • Arcade – 25 

    • Eagle – 27

NYSEG customers without power:

    • Bennington – 1,526

    • Castile – 10

    • Gainesville – 46

    • Java – 1,199

    • Middlebury – 29

    • Sheldon – 1,341

    • Warsaw – 1

National Grid customers without power:

    • Eagle, Bliss, Java, Gainesville area – approximately 589

    • Varysburg, Warsaw, Attica area – approximately – 1,557.

Power companies have been working through the night to restore electricity to county homes and continue this morning.

Wednesday, March 8, 2017 at 5:16 pm

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The above photos were taken in the Village of Perry early this afternoon. 

Trees were reported to have fallen across power lines, and power lines were reported down at the "Five Corners" near the Arrowmart at Leichester and Lake roads.

Responding to the scene included Perry and Perry Center fire departments, and Perry Police.

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The above photos were taken earlier this afternoon at the corner of routes 77 and 20A. 

Officials say the winds were reported to have peaked at 102 mph, causing three tractor-trailers to get blown over. 

No injuries were reported in these three incidents.

Responding to the scene included the Wyoming County Sheriff's Department, and Harris Corners, Varysburg, Bennington, Sheldon, Strykersville, and North Java fire departments.

Route 77 was closed for a short time while crews removed the vehicles from the road.

UPDATE 6:25 p.m.: Authorities report Route 77 has been reopened to traffic, the scene has been cleared. However, the light at routes 20A and 77 is still not functioning.

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The two photos above are from Route 354 in Bennington. 

One of the trees blocked the eastbound lane of traffic for a short time.

Responding to the scene was the Wyoming County Sheriff's Department and a county highway worker.

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The three photos above were taken in Attica, in which the Village is reported to have a widespread power outage, along with closed roads due to fallen trees and power lines across roadways.

Responding to the scenes was the Attica Police Department.

Monday, February 27, 2017 at 4:10 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, accident, news, Cowlesville, Bennington.

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Photo submitted by the New York State Police

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    Nicholas Price

Nicholas Price, 29, of Batavia, was arrested in connection with a hit-and-run accident that happened Jan. 27 in the Town of Bennington.

According to the original report, around 11:50 a.m. a black Hyundai Accent was traveling eastbound when it went off the road on Route 354 in the Hamlet of Cowlesville. 

The car was said to have struck a mailbox, then a red GMC Sierra pickup truck before coming to rest against a tree. 

The driver is accused of fleeing the scene and driving the Hyundai eastbound with extensive damage to the front end.

On Feb. 17, New York State Troopers responded to a medical call on Halstead Road in the Town of Batavia. While at the scene, troopers say they saw a black Hyundai Accent with front end damage similar to what was reported in the Cowlesville incident. 

Upon further investigation, and evidence collected from the scene, officers say they were able to match the suspect vehicle to the original accident.

Subsequently, Price was charged Feb. 24 with criminal mischief in the fourth degree, leaving the scene of property damage accident, reckless driving, moved from lane unsafely, and drove across hazard markings.

He is due in the Town of Bennington Court sometime in March.

See related: Police seeking information in hit and run collision in Cowlesville

Tuesday, February 7, 2017 at 4:08 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, accident, news, Cowlesville, Bennington.

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2007 Hyundai Accent – not actual vehicle in this case.

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2011 Hyundai Accent – not actual vehicle in this case.

Photos supplied by the New York State Police.

The New York State Police are investigating a hit and run collision that happened at approximately 11:50 a.m. Jan. 27 in Cowlesville.

Police say they are looking for a black Hyundai Accent between the model years of 2007 and 2011. 

According to reports, the vehicle was traveling eastbound when it went off the road striking a mailbox, then a red GMC Sierra pickup truck before coming to rest against a tree. 

The Hyundai fled the scene traveling eastbound, with extensive front-end damage.

Anyone with any information regarding this collision is asked to contact the New York State Police: (585) 344-6200.

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Scene of collision. 

Tuesday, January 17, 2017 at 11:51 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, announcements, Warsaw, Arcade, Perry, Attica, Bennington.

Highlighting a decade of economic development growth for the county, the Wyoming County Business Center Inc. (WCBC) recently celebrated its 10th anniversary.

Established in 2006 by the county’s Board of Supervisors, the WCBC became the small business economic development agency in the county.

The not-for-profit local development corporation works with county economic development partners – the Industrial Development Agency (IDA), the Planning Department, the Chamber of Commerce & Tourism, and the Business Education Council (BEC) –  “to provide opportunities for business growth by promoting and assisting economic development projects that result in capital investments and job creation and retention in Wyoming County.”

The WCBC plays a vital role in the development of entrepreneurs, assistance of retail projects, micro lending, marketing for business attraction, and real estate redevelopment projects. It also plays an integral role in the development of shovel ready sites (at the stage where workers can be employed and construction can begin), and of both green sites (the practice of maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings and sites while minimizing the impact on human health and the environment) and “environmentally challenged” (contaminated) property for expanding businesses and businesses considering locating in the county.

Recently, Buffalo Business First recognized five Wyoming County communities, among 77, for having the strongest entrepreneurial spirit in Western New York, stating “the entrepreneurial spirit is alive and well in these communities.”

Of the 77 communities listed, locally they include, in order of ranking:

    • #21 the Town of Arcade – population 4,158, of which 1,216 are full-time workers and 119 (9.8 percent) are self-employed;

    • #25 Town of Bennington –  population of 3,316, with 1,204 full-time workers and 114 (9.5 percent) self-employed; 

    • #28 Town of Warsaw – population 4,989, of which 1,645 are full-time workers and 136 (8.3 percent) are self-employed;

    • #32 Town of Attica – population 7,520, with 1,343 full-time workers and 108 (8 percent) self-employed; and

    • #56 Town of Perry – population 4,497, of which 1,463 are full-time workers and 81 (5.5 percent) are self-employed.

According to the report, the statistics are from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2015 American Community Survey, which compiles the data at the local level. The rankings are based on the percentage who are self-employed.

To assist community entrepreneurs, the Business Center offers the entrepreneurship development program FastTrac New Venture. This program provides participants the necessary tools to refine their innovative business idea. 

Since its inception, the program has educated more than 120 entrepreneurs. It has enabled them to overcome barriers and challenges common in starting a new business while assisting them in building a strong, solid business plan. In turn, 53 businesses have started, thus creating more than 90 jobs in the county. Additionally, these jobs provide a source of new tax base both for real property and sales tax. 

“The program has been extremely successful and FastTrac is a core component of economic development growth and job creation in Wyoming County,” said WCBC President Jim Pierce.

The Business Center also administers a low-interest micro-loan program to assist new business startups and established retail businesses. The loans coordinate financial assistance and incentives with its economic development partners. Currently there are 14 businesses in the Center’s loan portfolio. 

In 2016 it also developed a new business attraction marketing program to draw attention to the county’s assets and its location as a great place to expand or locate new business. 

The marketing program and collateral marketing pieces that have been developed were the results of a series of focus group meetings with stakeholders. They worked to develop a marketing strategy promoting the attractiveness of Wyoming County for new business. They include a new marketing logo and tag line, and a website that highlights the business strengths of Wyoming County.

The website features a brochure and selling points for three targeted industries – agri-business, advanced manufacturing, and recreation and tourism businesses. It headlines three short videos featuring existing companies in the county. Representatives of each company bestow the benefits and successes they have realized being located within the county’s borders.

Additionally, the videos showcase the strength and attractiveness of the workforce, why these businesses are so successful in Wyoming County and why other businesses should consider a location here.

“We are proud to enter into our next decade and thank the Wyoming County Board of Supervisors and the Business Center’s Board of Directors. We are greatly appreciative of the generous FastTrac program sponsors – Tompkins Bank of Castile and Complete Payroll (the workforce development resources available to FastTrac participants through Community Action for Wyoming County), the program facilitators Jeff Fitch and Mike Fitch, along with numerous guest speakers and support from the IDA,” Pierce said. “Thank you to everyone who has played a role in the Business Center and our collective work to improve the economic viability of Wyoming County. 

“The Business Center will continue to provide a very important role in economic development through assisting retail projects looking to grow and expand, micro lending, business attraction marketing and entrepreneurship development with the FastTrac program. We are a network, an information hub, a partner, a resource connector and an advisor all focused on strengthening economic development in the county.”

Visit wyomingcountyny.org to see the most recently added recreation and tourism business attraction video. Contact Pierce at jpierce@wycoida.org or (585) 786- 3764 for attractive incentives and resources available.

To learn more about the Kauffman Foundation’s FastTrac New Venture Program or upcoming informational open house for start-up and small businesses visit www.wycobusiness.org or contact Jennifer Tyczka at jtyczka@wycoida.org or (585) 786- 3764.

Monday, December 19, 2016 at 5:57 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Bennington, holidays.

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Around this time of year when he was a boy growing up in Cheektowaga, one of the things that Jim Dick did, as all children do, was wait for Santa Claus. However, it wasn’t so much the anticipation of Santa’s visit on Christmas Day, it was the annual visit of Santa on Rescue Hose Company #1 in Cheektowaga fire truck.

“I waited all year for that truck to come,” Dick said. “I enjoyed it as a kid and wanted to bring that same experience here to our fire district.”

Dick recruited members of the fire company and for the past three years delivers Santa and his elves to area children. In addition to the visit, Santa brings the children coloring books, candy canes, and gifts (provided by the families) in a pre-planned route that hits “all four corners” of his fire district.

“It’s something I had always looked forward to as a kid and I enjoy doing for the community now.”

And one other thing, who is Santa for Bennington Fire Company?

Chief Jim Dick.

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Friday, December 2, 2016 at 4:26 pm

The following are from State Correctional Facilities in Attica. They were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun Nov. 28.

Amanda Hoover, who committed a crime in Arcade, was sentenced to five years probation, $65 in restitution, and a fee. She was convicted of attempted criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fourth degree, a Class D felony.

Benedict Agostini had his case adjourned to Dec. 21.

Kijana Funderburk admitted to a violation of conditional discharge. He is scheduled for sentencing Dec. 21.

The following were in court before Mohun Dec. 1.

Grayson Stock, who is accused of a crime in Arcade, had his case adjourned to Jan. 12 for motions.

James Smith, who committed a crime in Arcade, was sentenced to a three-year conditional discharge, along with fees and surcharges. He was convicted of attempted criminal possession of a weapon in the second degree, a Class D felony.

Ronald Sharp, who committed a crime in Arcade, pled guilty to criminal mischief in the fourth degree, a misdemeanor. He was sentenced to a one-year conditional discharge, along with fees and surcharges. Additionally, an order of protection was also issued.

Michelle Westfall, who committed a crime in Arcade, pled guilty to criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fourth degree, a Class C felony; and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class D felony. She paid $40 in restitution and was sentenced to one year interim probation. The case has been adjourned to Nov. 16.

Saida Ali, who committed a crime in Attica, was sentenced to one-year interim probation. He was convicted of promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony; and conspiracy in the fifth degree, a misdemeanor. The case has been adjourned to Oct. 12.

Lonniqua Williams, who is accused of a crime in Attica, had her case adjourned to March 16.

Maria Maldonado, who committed a crime in Attica, was sentenced to five years probation, along with fees and surcharges. She was convicted of attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony.

Spencer Bressette, who is accused of a crime in Bennington, had his case adjourned to Feb. 23 for plea. A pre-plea investigation has also been ordered.

Joseph Smith, who committed a crime in Eagle, was sentenced to three years probation, a five-year order of protection, along with fees and surcharges.

Amanda Washburn, who committed a crime in Gainesville, pled guilty to two counts of petit larceny as misdemeanors. She is scheduled for sentencing Feb. 23.

Eric Kingsley, who is accused of a crime in Gainesville, was in court for motions. His case has been adjourned to Dec. 14.

Chad Staley, who is accused of a crime in Genesee Falls, had his case adjourned to Jan. 12 for motions.

Michelle Jewell, who committed a crime in Perry, was sentenced to five years probation, $8,373 in restitution, along with fees and surcharges. She was convicted of grand larceny in the fourth degree, a Class E felony.

Thomas Grinnell, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to three years probation, along with an order of protection issued. He was convicted of criminal mischief in the fourth degree, a misdemeanor.

Julie Dutton, who allegedly committed a crime in Warsaw, failed to appear in court. The case has been adjourned to Dec. 15.

Lynda Brown, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony. The case has been adjourned to Jan. 12 for sentencing. She is held without bail in the Wyoming County Jail.

Brendynn Jordan, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to five years probation on the conviction of attempted reckless endangerment in the first degree, a Class E felony. She was also sentenced to three years probation on the conviction of unlawful fleeing a police officer in a motor vehicle in the third degree, a misdemeanor. For the charges of reckless driving, a misdemeanor, and two counts of speeding she is required to pay $1,175 in fines and surcharges. Probation is to run concurrently.

Steven Snyder, who committed a crime in Wethersfield, was sentenced to one to three years in prison, a three-year conditional discharge with an ignition interlock device, and fees and surcharges. He was convicted of driving while intoxicated, a Class E felony.

Brandon Matteson, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, admitted to a violation of probation. He was resentenced to one year in jail.

Jonathan Blasdell, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, admitted to a violation of probation. He was resentenced to one to three years in prison, along with fees and surcharges. 

Ryan Donnelly, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, withdrew his admission to a violation of probation. The case has been adjourned to Dec. 19 for a violation of probation hearing.

The following were in court before Mohun Dec. 2.

Jerod Trebian, who committed a crime in Silver Springs, appeared for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant. He pled guilty to attempted burglary in the second degree, a Class D felony. He admits to being a second felony offender. He is scheduled for sentencing Feb. 2. Bail continues.

Chadwick White, who committed a crime in the county, admitted to a violation of probation. He was resentenced to six months in Wyoming County Jail and a three-year conditional discharge.

Margaret Wolfe, who is accused of committing a crime in Wyoming County, had her case adjourned to Dec. 5.

Tuesday, November 29, 2016 at 11:14 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Santa, Bennington.
Event Date and Time: 
December 17, 2016 -
5:00pm to 8:30pm

Just received word from the North Pole, Santa will once again be in Bennington Fire Company's fire district from 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Dec. 17, and is willing to come visit good boys and girls in the district.

If you would like to schedule a Santa visit, call Bennington Fire Chief Jim Dick at (716) 523-1556 so we can add you to the list.

Wednesday, October 26, 2016 at 2:08 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, event, Attica, Bennington, Warsaw.

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Photos provided by Laura Friend.

It was a somber day, as people lined the streets throughout the Village of Attica and Town of Bennington, to say goodbye to one of their own, Staff Sgt. Thomas P. Seiler, who died Oct. 12 in Fort Bragg, N.C.

The Region 1 Patriot Guard Riders, along with Bennington Fire Company, Attica Fire Department were in the funeral procession with the Attica Police Department providing escort. The Warsaw and Alden fire departments had their aerial trucks set up at Water and Main streets with a large American Flag drapped above the street. Fort Drum’s 10th Mountain Division rendered the military honors.

"Staff Sgt. Thomas Seiler was a beloved member of the 1-7 ADA team and will be sorely missed," said Lt. Col. Jason Townsend, commander of 1st Battalion, 7th Air Defense Artillery, in a statement. "Thomas was an exceptional teacher, coach and mentor to our soldiers, and our thoughts and prayers are with his family during this difficult time." 

Fort Bragg will be having their own memorial service, to honor Seiler at a date to be disclosed to the family and his unit.

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