Perry

Thursday, March 23, 2017 at 8:21 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, health, events, Perry, organ donation.

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Ed Draves had called his wife one day and asked her if he could donate one of his kidneys – thinking he was joking, she promptly replied “yes.”

The following day, Draves asked the same thing of his boss, he did, after all have to find out if his boss would agree to the time off. Again, the question was thought of as a joke and his boss replied “yes.”

“On a trip to Mexico, one of the guys there, Brother Joe, had said, ‘If you really want to pray a great prayer…' ” said Draves during a presentation on live organ donation at the Perry Rotary March meeting.

“Gary had kidney failure and was looking for an organ donor. I felt I had to do something about it. So I thought of Brother Joe’s words…’If you really want to pray a great prayer…’ So I prayed a great prayer and went and got a blood test to see if I could be a match with Gary.”

Just two years ago, Draves donated one of his kidneys to a "brother" in need.

He first found out about Gary through an “open letter” in The Masonic News, a newsletter for the Masonic Lodge Draves belongs to. 

Gary Garippo was suffering from a form of noncancerous kidney disease and was in need of a transplant. After Draves read the letter, he went to get the initial blood test to see if he was a match. 

Draves is a member of Western Star Lodge No 1185 and is on the Grand Lodge of Free And Accepted Masons of New York Blood and Organ Donor committee, partnering with Unyts. 

According to its website, Unyts is a “donor center organ, tissue, eye and blood donation service in the Western New York community." Its vision is to “advance the dynamic Donate Life” message.

Draves ended up being the second-best match for Gary. Another Western New Yorker was the best match. However, as he put it, he did “pray a great prayer.” 

“The woman who was the first match for Gary ended up having to back out. During the testing, it was found that she was prone to kidney stones. I got a call and was asked if I was still willing to donate.”

Draves said yes and soon began a battery of health exams – he had to lose a few pounds – and testing – blood tests, health tests, stress tests, and psychological testing.

“They had to ensure that I would have no regrets if the recipient ended up being a ‘jerk.’ They also had to talk with my wife and daughter to make sure they were supportive of the decision.”

According to United Network for Organ Sharing, in 2015, close to 31,000 organ transplants took place nationally. Approximately 81 percent (24,982) of the transplants involved organs from deceased donors, who can donate multiple organs. The remaining 19 percent (5,986) were made possible by living donors.

However, at one point in the testing, doctors were unsure if Draves was really healthy enough to withstand the surgery.

“Come to find out, I have a heart issue – prolapse mitral valve. Basically, I have a leaky heart.”

While his condition isn’t serious now, annual exams allow the doctors to monitor it. If at any time they notice a change, surgery can be performed before a life-threatening condition arises. However, Draves decided to get a second opinion. And while his condition was confirmed by a cardiologist, he also cleared him for live organ donation.

“I passed all the tests and surgery was scheduled. I went in on a Friday. By Saturday the nurses had me up walking around. By Saturday afternoon I wanted to go home. On Sunday, I went home.

“On Monday, I went with my wife to go get her glasses and I wanted to mall walk, so we did, and then we went to Denny’s for a ‘Grand Slam.' I didn’t take any of the prescribed pain medication, I took Tylenol instead.”

In the United States, Draves says 118,000 people are in need of an organ transplant, of those people, 22 die everyday because there is no organ for them.

“During the time we have been here, one hour and 15 minutes, someone has died.”

And the irony is, prior to Gary’s open letter and Draves's subsequent donation, Draves was not even registered as an organ donor.

As he puts it, organ donating “saves lives and leave a legacy.”

Draves and his wife live in Orchard Park with their two children. A wine manager with Premier Wine & Spirit in Orchard Park, he is also a volunteer with Unyts, Shriners, Masons, Grand Lodge Youth Committee, Zuleika Grotto (which raises money for dentistry for disabled kids), Windom Elementary Shared Decision Committee, and he's a martial arts instructor.

For more information on becoming an organ donor visit http://www.unyts.org/

Thursday, March 23, 2017 at 2:29 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Perry, Warsaw.
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       Roy A. Newton

A Perry man is facing felony drug charges following a traffic stop on Simmons Road, Perry. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies stopped Roy A. Newton, 44, for allegedly speeding. During the stop, deputies say he exhibited multiple signs of drug use. After allegedly performing poorly on field sobriety testing, he was arrested. 

Newton is accused of possessing eight morphine pills, 7.3 grams of concentrated cannabis, which is a controlled substance known as “dabbing oil,” and other drug paraphernalia. It is reported that the aggregate weight of the “dabbing oil” elevated the drug possession charge to a felony. Additionally, he is accused of possessing the concentrated cannabis with intent to sell it.

Deputies took him to the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office, where a drug recognition expert determined him to be impaired by narcotics and cannabis.

Subsequently, Newton was charged with: two counts of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, both as Class D felonies; criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree; driving while ability impaired by drugs; and driving while ability impaired by the combined influence of drugs. He was also cited for two traffic infractions, speed over 55 mph; and illegal window tint. He was put in Wyoming County Jail on $5,000 cash bail or $10,000 bond.

He is due in the Town of Perry Court April 5.

Monday, March 20, 2017 at 9:05 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Bliss, Attica, Perry, Gainesville, Eagle.

Richard W. Stone, 34, and Marie L. Stone, 34, both of Perry, were charged March 14 with endangering the welfare of a child. The Stones are accused of having unsafe living conditions in the home. The children were removed from the home by Child Protective Services. Richard was also charged with criminal mischief in the fourth degree following a domestic incident in the Village of Perry. He is accused of ripping a cell phone out of the victim's hand, to prevent her from calling the police. Both are due in Perry Village Court at a later date. The Perry Police Department assisted Wyoming County Child Protective Services.

Debra A. Gross, 52, of Gainesville, was charged March 9 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the third degree, unlicensed operator of a motor vehicle, and inadequate/no muffler. Gross is due in Avon Town Court at a later date.

Giovanni Alvarez, 32, of Buffalo, was charged March 19 with grand larceny in the fourth degree. Alvarez is accused of stealing a vehicle from a Main Street, Bliss, address and driving it back to Buffalo. The vehicle was then located on East Street, Buffalo, by the Buffalo Police Department. Subsequently, officers located Alvarez and arrested him without incident. He was turned over to the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office and put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $2,000 cash bail or $4,000 bond. He is due in court at a later date.

Gary Illerbrun, 52, of Perry, was charged March 17 with throwing refuse onto a highway, driving while intoxicated, and driving with a BAC of .08 percent or greater. Illerbrun was arrested following a traffic stop in the Village of Perry. He was stopped for allegedly throwing garbage onto a highway. During the investigation, Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies determined Illerbrun to be intoxicated. He was taken to the Sheriff’s Office where he supplied a breath sample which allegedly showed a BAC of .10 percent. He is due in the Village of Perry Court April 11.

Cory R. Lapp, 24, of Attica, was charged March 18 with driving while intoxicated; operating a motor vehicle with a BAC .08 percent or higher, first offense; failure to yield the right of way when entering a roadway, and failure to use turn signal. Lapp was stopped on Union Street, Batavia, and subsequently arrested for driving while intoxicated. He is due at 9 a.m. in the City of Batavia Court April 5.

Thursday, March 16, 2017 at 4:26 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Perry, Warsaw.
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  Charles J. Bozzette

The Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office arrested Charles J. Bozzette March 15 in connection with an alleged rape in the Village of Perry. The 34-year-old Perry man was charged with rape in the third degree.

Bozzette is accused of having sexual intercourse with a 16-year-old female at a home in the Village of Perry. 

He was put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $20,000 cash bail.

The Sheriff’s Office was assisted by the Perry and Warsaw police departments.

Thursday, March 16, 2017 at 9:37 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Perry, Warsaw, Attica, Bennington.

Robert S. Starling, 60, Bayville, N.J., was charged March 12 with aggravated unlicensed operation in the third degree and operating a motor vehicle while using a portable electric device. Starling was charged following a traffic stop on Route 20A, Perry for an alleged cell phone violation. During the stop, deputies say Starling was found to have had his driving privileges suspended in New York State since 2001 for failure to answer a summons. He was put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $500 cash bail. He is due in the Town of Perry Court June 14.

John M. Chaplin, 36, of Attica, was charged March 15 with moved from lane unsafely, driving while intoxicated, driving with a BAC of .08 percent or more, and aggravated DWI with a BAC of .18 percent or more. The Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office received a report of a vehicle in a ditch on Sierk Road, Bennington. During the investigation, deputies say Chaplin said he drove off the road to avoid a deer. Further investigation allegedly revealed he was driving while intoxicated. He was taken to the Sheriff’s Office for a breath test. He is due in the Town of Bennington Court at a later date.

Wesley Goerss, 26, of Scottsville, was arrested March 15 on a Wyoming County Family Court Warrant. Deputies say Goerss turned himself in at the Village of Le Roy Police Department. Subsequently, he was brought back to Wyoming County and put in Wyoming County Jail on $500 cash bail. He is due in Wyoming County Family Court at a later date.

Tuesday, March 14, 2017 at 3:01 pm

Closings and cancellations in Wyoming County for March 14, as of 2:53 p.m.:
Closed:

    • Adult Day Healthcare Center at Wyoming County Community Hospital;

    • Gainesville Public Library;

    • Warsaw Public Library. The board meeting is postponed until next week;

    • Genesee Community College -- all locations;

    • Literacy West NY, Warsaw;

    • Lumberyard Restaurant, Perry;

    • Oak Orchard Health, Warsaw;

    • Perry Library; and
    • Warsaw Head Start.

Canceled:
    • Warsaw Moose Lodge -- Bingo tonight is canceled;
    • Warsaw Planning Board has canceled its meeting;

    • Warsaw Write Connection group meeting at Warsaw Library is canceled;
    • Wyoming County Cooperative Extension -- VFD Regulations for Livestock.

  • Owners and Bee Keepers - meeting at the Wyoming County Ag Center is canceled; and

    • Wyoming County Office For the Aging: No home-delivered meals today
 and Medicare 101 class for this evening rescheduled for March 29. Call for reservations.

Closings and cancellations for Tuesday:
    • Silver Springs food pantry; and
    • St. Mary's Senior Lunch in Silver Springs is canceled.

Monday, March 13, 2017 at 9:41 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, announcements, Business, education, Perry.

A message from the Perry Central School District (PCSD): 

We would like to make our local business owners and community members aware that the Perry Central School District is not soliciting funds in support of PCSD through the All American T-shirt Company. 

Its representatives worked with the district Friday to end the solicitations.

We have asked that if businesses did purchase advertising, that any payments already made be refunded. All American T-shirt agreed to do so and we thank them for working with us to correct this situation.

We greatly appreciate the support of our local businesses and community members and apologize for the confusion. 

In instances that the District is engaged in fundraising efforts, we will inform you directly. Should you receive any calls soliciting your support in the future, you can contact the district Business Office at (585) 237-0270, ext. 1001, to verify the validity of the efforts before giving any information to the caller.

Friday, March 10, 2017 at 6:32 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Warsaw, Perry, Gainesville.

Jeremiah J. Cieszynski, 50, of Warsaw, was arrested March 9 on a warrant out of Cattaraugus County for failure to pay support. He is being held at the Cattaraugus County Jail, Little Valley.

Benishio C. Coger, 21, of Albion, was charged March 9 with criminal contempt in the second degree. Perry Police report Coger was found at the home of a female acquaintance who has an order of protection barring him from having contact with her. Police allegedly found him at the residence by Wyoming County Probation when they were checking on a probationer and assisted in the investigation. Coger was put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $2,000 cash bail. He is due in court at a later date.

Debra A. Gross, 52, of Gainesville, was charged March 9 with aggravated unlicensed operator of a motor vehicle in the third degree, unlicensed operator, and inadequate plate lamp. Perry Police say Gross was stopped on Covington Street, Perry, following a license check which determined her driver’s license was suspended. She is due in Perry Village Court March 14.

Friday, March 10, 2017 at 6:09 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Perry, heroin, opioids, education, drugs.

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The pain in Avi Israel’s voice was evident as he described his son Michael’s spiraling decent into addiction and subsequent death. 

“Michael died at 20 years old. You see, my son suffered from Crohn’s disease. It was very painful for him. When he was 18, he was prescribed narcotics to deal with the pain, the Xanax was to help him cope with anxiety issues, as well as various other drugs for depression,” Israel said. “The medical community didn’t really know too much about addiction back then… Not a day that goes by…that I don’t miss my kid.”

Students from Perry Central School – seventh through 12th grade –  sat in rapt attention earlier this week as Israel spoke of his son and his struggle with addiction. The program was sponsored by Perry Rotary Club, with the support of the Perry Police Department, and the Wyoming County District Attorney’s Office. 

“We have a safety committee and the chief (Perry PD) gave us information about the statistics of opioid use,” said Middle/High School Principal Becky Belkota. “And we’ve seen the articles and the like, and it’s something we want to get ahead of…prevention as oppose to reaction. We wanted to give an insight to addiction, not just heroin.”

The question is asked: “How many of you know someone who died because of addiction?” 

The majority of students in attendance raised their hands.

“Addiction is how you get there (dead). If you’re aware of the pitfalls; maybe you’ll be a little more cautious.

“There has been a four-fold increase in addiction since 1999. When you think of an addict or a junkie, what do you think of?… You may think of the dirty strung-out man hanging out on a street corner… Does my son look like that to you?… Addiction doesn’t discriminate.”

Opioids are a prescription form of heroin, Israel says, and “said to be more intense than heroin.”

“It’s a selfish addiction. You may be doing it to yourself, but you are hurting everyone else. There are more than 100,000 tombstones related to opioid deaths in this country.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “overdose deaths involving prescription opioids have quadrupled since 1999…From 1999 to 2015, more than 183,000 people have died in the United States from overdoses related to prescription opioids.”

Today, nearly half of all opioid overdose deaths nationwide involve a prescription opioid. More than 15,000 people died from overdoses involving prescription opioids in 2015, the most recent data available.

Between November and December Perry law enforcement has responded to four heroin/opioid overdoses. All were saved by using Narcan, which is the brand name for the generic drug naloxone, which is a medication used to block the effects of opioids, especially in overdoses. (Intravaneously, it works in two minutes and when injected into muscle, it works within five minutes.)

However, in the last year, the village has one confirmed death due to overdose, Police Chief Mike Grover says. Just recently there were three overdoses in Perry. In all three of the incidents naloxone was administered. In two of the incidents, the victim was revived. In the third incident, the victim was unable to be saved. The irony of these three victims, two of the overdoses happened to the same person in the span of a week. During the second overdose, he succumbed to the drugs.

In Warsaw, Chief of Police Pete Hoffmeister says there have been 10 overdoses in the past year, with two ending up in deaths. While naloxone was used to save eight of those who overdosed, two were dead before law enforcement arrived. Of those 10, two were in September, two in October, and two in December – as of Dec. 30. The youngest person they encountered was 17 years old and the oldest 55.

Nationwide, every 17 minutes someone dies from an opioid overdose. About two years ago, there were 100 deaths in Erie County. In 2015, it more than doubled. In 2016, that number could reach over 500. That’s about 10 per week. February alone recorded 23 overdose deaths in just one week.

In Wyoming County, between 2010 and 2014 the number of opioid-related emergency department admissions increased 47.6 percent – 42 and 62. The number of opioid-related inpatient hospital admissions rose from 61 to 91 respectively – a 49.2-percent increase. 

During that same time period, those who were admitted for treatment for any opioid in Western New York was 7,679 in 2010. By 2014, the number of people seeking treatment rose by almost a third – 10,154 – a 32-percent increase.

Across the state, those in treatment for heroin use was 55,900 in 2010; in 2014, the number was 77,647. Deaths across the state due to heroin overdose increased 163 percent (215 in 2008, and 637 in 2013) and opioid overdoses increased 30 percent (763 to 952).

Six years ago, Wyoming County didn’t see a heroin issue in the county as much as today. Deputies say they’ve dealt with the drug 30 to 35 times in 2016. The county saw five deaths related to heroin overdoses and 26 overdose incidents law enforcement knows about that are from opioids.

“If this was the flu, we’d all be under quarantine,” Israel said. “Since it’s not the flu, people look at those who are addicts as…they did it to themselves.

“When you think of the word addict, what comes to mind? Someone sleeping in the street? A loser? Those who have lost someone…did they look like losers? They are not the picture of what addiction looks like today.”

Israel says roughly 10 percent of people have an addiction. A misnomer is that to be an addict, one had to use every day. An addict is when you do use, you have difficulty controlling it.

“You don’t have to have cravings to have an addiction,” Israel said. “Addiction isn’t about how easy it is to use. It’s how easy it is to stop.”

Michael suffered with a lot of pain because of Crohn's disease, which is commonly found at the end of the small intestine where it joins the beginning of the large intestine, is when the digestive or gastrointestinal tract is chronically inflamed.The first prescription he was given for pain relief was hydrocodone – an addictive narcotic, especially to a young person, Israel says.

“In 2010, Michael told me he was addicted to his pain pills. In January 2011, we went to the doctor and he told them he was an addict. They told him they had it under control… Michael died June 4, 2011. It took six months before Michael died. That’s how quick an addiction can grab you. He couldn’t kick his habit. He couldn’t let go. I kept asking him…'Michael, why don’t you just quit?’ "

Israel cautions the students, telling them an addiction at their age is “deadly and it’s your life.” 

“Your brain is still developing…It’s like combining peanut butter and jelly and stirring it all together then trying to separate it. It doesn’t happen.”

According to officials, you may be more prone to addiction if you have a family history of addiction. But family history and genetics do not negate the company you keep. 

“Addiction robbed me of my kid,” Israel said. “I blame myself… partly because I didn’t know enough about addiction. I knew everything about Crohn’s disease. But I didn’t know about addiction… It robs you of everything you hold dear; everything you love goes away. Your friends – when you start acting like a jerk – will go away. Your family starts not inviting you to get-togethers.

“Micheal came up to me one time; he needed a hug. I found it hard because I just thought he was destroying our family. It wasn't because I didn't love him. It's because I didn't understand his addiction.”

When your brain only focuses on one thing you become incapable of making even the simplest decisions, Israel says. Once you get into this kind of addiction it doesn't let go. The only escape is to use again, but you fall deeper and deeper into the rabbit hole. And sometimes, you lose the fight.

“I can't stress how important it is to not start with anything. Don't give into peer pressure. I cannot impress upon you how painful it is to lose someone you love. It is one of the worst pains I have ever experienced. And still feel.

“I miss my son so bad it keeps me up at night. The pain just cuts me like a knife. Think of that pain you'd inflict to your parents if something happened to you. My three daughters miss their brother. They don't talk very much about it. At the holidays there is always an empty seat. He will never be there anymore. 

“You have the option of saying no to heavy painkillers. You can say you are OK with taking just a Tylenol. Once you start it grabs you and pulls you down so fast; you may think you have it under control, but you really don't unless you get help.”

Israel says the fear addicts have is the fear of withdrawal. It’s akin to having the flu…”only one hundred times worse.”

“What I wanted to impress on you is what addiction does to you and your family and how severe it is today and the pain it leaves behind,” Israel said. 

“I’m a little worried about upcoming surgery and medications after,” said Perry Sophomore Chelsea Pascoe. “It definitely impacted us to just stay clear.

“We are told a lot about what would happen (if you become addicted) but we saw, sort of firsthand on what it will do… And when he found his son, I don't know how you'd cope with something like that.”

“You don't see it very often… the story (of addiction),” said Freshman Russ Johnson. “You hear about it, but you never really get to see how it affects the families and see what happens… I want to be the one that just stays clean. It's who I am. I want it to mean something to me. It's important.”

“I’m not whole because I miss someone really bad. I hope you never have to go through it,” Israel said.

For more information on Michael story and addiction, visit savethemichaels.org.

For resources on addiction and recovery in Wyoming County visit Recovery.org or Spectrum Human Services or Smart Recovery of Warsaw.

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Friday, March 10, 2017 at 10:38 am

Morrisville State College, Morrisville, recently announced the students who were named to the dean's list for the fall 2016 semester. To be named to the dean's list, a student must achieve an average of 3.0 to 3.99 for the semester and complete 12 credit hours.

The list includes:

    • Sara Haggerty, Patricia Hulton, and Patricia Hulton, all of Arcade;

    • Grace Book of Bliss;

    • Emily Jurek and Patricia Hulton, both of Perry; and

    • Christopher Bush of Silver Springs.

The college was ranked among the Best Regional Colleges in the North by U.S. News and World Report Best Colleges 2017 issue and was also recognized in the Top Public Schools, Regional Colleges North in the 2017 Best Colleges rankings. For more information about Morrisville State College, visit www.morrisville.edu.

Thursday, March 9, 2017 at 4:25 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Perry, Gainesville, Sheldon, Attica, Warsaw.
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 Dennis Rawleigh Jr.

Dennis N. Rawleigh Jr., 46, of Batavia, formerly of Perry, was charged March 7 with one count of scheme to defraud in the second degree, a Class A misdemeanor. Rawleigh is accused of not completing work he received payments for in November. At that time, he was doing business as Rawleigh’s Tear Down and allegedly received more than $15,000 in payments from a Town of Gainesville woman to perform work on two houses she owns in Perry and Gainesville. The woman reportedly told Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies that very little work was completed on the Perry home and none on the Gainesville residence. A second victim, a male from the Town of Sheldon, reported paying Rawleigh a $3,200 down payment to tear down a barn. It is said that he attempted to pull the large barn down with a chain and his pickup truck with negative results. He is accused of making no further attempts at pulling the barn down since June 2015. Rawleigh is due in Gainesville Town Court later this month.

Daniel Thomas Henning, 36, of Attica, was charged March 8 with driving while intoxicated, driving with a BAC of .08 or higher, inadequate exhaust, driving on sidewalk, and unlicensed operator of a motor vehicle. Genesee County Sheriff’s deputies arrested Henning following a car accident on Route 5 in the City of Batavia. He is due in the City of Batavia Court April 19.

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     Michael A. Young      Victoria L. Young

Michael A. Young, 35, and Victoria L. Young, 22, both of Attica, were charged March 7 with multiple offenses following a traffic stop on North Main Street, Warsaw. Victoria was charged with falsely reporting an incident in the third degree. Michael was charged with criminal contempt in the second degree, operating a vehicle while registration suspended, and operating a motor vehicle without insurance. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say they stopped the pair because the vehicle was allegedly found to have no insurance and a suspended vehicle registration. Although the car was registered to Victoria, deputies say Michael was driving the car and Victoria was the passenger. It is alleged that she told deputies she was 38 weeks pregnant and was in labor, at which time the vehicle was escorted directly to the hospital. According to the report, after being treated it was determined that she was not pregnant and she had lied to the police about it. Deputies also found Victoria was wanted on a warrant by the Olean Police Department on a petit larceny charge. She was subsequently arrested and turned over to Olean Police. Police also say there was an active stay away order of protection in place on Michael, which ordered him to stay away from Victoria. Both are due in the Village of Warsaw Court April 10. The vehicle was towed from the scene, and the license plates seized and returned to the Department of Motor Vehicles. 

Thursday, March 9, 2017 at 4:13 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, accident, Perry.

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Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies responded to a two-car accident on Route 20A just east of the Perry-Warsaw Airport, Perry.

A silver Subaru was parked on the shoulder of the road when the driver of a Volkswagon Beetle veered out of the lane and struck the Subaru at full speed.

The driver of the Volkswagon was cited for moving from lane unsafely.

Minor injuries were reported.

Deputies were assisted at the scene by Perry Ambulance and Perry Police.

Wednesday, March 8, 2017 at 5:16 pm

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The above photos were taken in the Village of Perry early this afternoon. 

Trees were reported to have fallen across power lines, and power lines were reported down at the "Five Corners" near the Arrowmart at Leichester and Lake roads.

Responding to the scene included Perry and Perry Center fire departments, and Perry Police.

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The above photos were taken earlier this afternoon at the corner of routes 77 and 20A. 

Officials say the winds were reported to have peaked at 102 mph, causing three tractor-trailers to get blown over. 

No injuries were reported in these three incidents.

Responding to the scene included the Wyoming County Sheriff's Department, and Harris Corners, Varysburg, Bennington, Sheldon, Strykersville, and North Java fire departments.

Route 77 was closed for a short time while crews removed the vehicles from the road.

UPDATE 6:25 p.m.: Authorities report Route 77 has been reopened to traffic, the scene has been cleared. However, the light at routes 20A and 77 is still not functioning.

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The two photos above are from Route 354 in Bennington. 

One of the trees blocked the eastbound lane of traffic for a short time.

Responding to the scene was the Wyoming County Sheriff's Department and a county highway worker.

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The three photos above were taken in Attica, in which the Village is reported to have a widespread power outage, along with closed roads due to fallen trees and power lines across roadways.

Responding to the scenes was the Attica Police Department.

Monday, March 6, 2017 at 9:30 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, education, Warsaw, Wyoming, Attica, Perry, Arcade.

The following local residents made the dean's list at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) for fall semester 2016-2017:

    • Katie Adinolfe, who is studying in the diagnostic medical sonography program; Nicholas Henderson, who is studying in the game design and development program: Monika Mc Keown, who is studying in the computing security program; Tyler Perry, who is studying in the mechanical engineering technology program; and Hanna Tangeman, who is studying in the graphic design program, all of Warsaw;

    • Dylan Fisher, who is studying in the packaging science program; and Matthew Santullo, who is studying in the mechanical engineering program, both of Wyoming;    

    • Justin Napieralski, of Attica, who is studying in the mechanical engineering program;

    • Konner Narowski, who is studying in the packaging science program; and Noah Wilson, who is studying in the game design and development program, both of Perry; and

    • Sam Tillinghast, of Arcade, who is studying in the computer science program.

Degree-seeking undergraduate students are eligible for dean's list if their term grade point average is greater than or equal to 3.400; they do not have any grades of “incomplete", "D" or "F"; and they have registered for, and completed, at least 12 credit hours

Founded in 1829, RIT enrolls about 19,000 students in more than 200 career-oriented and professional programs, making it among the largest private universities in the United States.

The university is internationally recognized and ranked for academic leadership in business, computing, engineering, imaging science, liberal arts, sustainability, and fine and applied arts. RIT also offers unparalleled support services for deaf and hard-of-hearing students. The cooperative education program is one of the oldest and largest in the nation. Global partnerships include campuses in China, Croatia, Dubai and Kosovo.

Friday, March 3, 2017 at 12:47 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Attica, Perry, Warsaw, Middlebury.

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The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun March 2.

Chivonne Gheorghe, who committed a crime in Attica, pled guilty to criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fourth degree, a Class C felony. Sentencing is scheduled July 6.

Roy Lawrence, who committed a crime in Perry, pled guilty to criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony. Sentencing is scheduled April 6. He is held in the Wyoming County Jail without bail.

Patrick Wheeler, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to five years probation and restitution of $60, which has been paid. He was convicted of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class D felony.

Matthew Hadfield, who is accused of a crime in Middlebury, had his case adjourned to April 6.

Jonathan Bucknam, who is accused of a crime in Perry, had his case adjourned to April 6. 

Heidi Hopkins, who committed a crime in Perry, pled guilty to criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony. Sentencing is scheduled April 6. She is held in the Wyoming County Jail without bail.

Dutch Bryndle, who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to attempted tampering with physical evidence and driving while ability impaired by drugs, both as misdemeanors. Bryndle was sentenced to a one year conditional discharge on both, paid a $1,000 fine, and his license was revoked.

Richard Greene Jr., who committed a crime in Warsaw, pled guilty to criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class D felony as a second felony offender. He was released on pretrial release.

Jonathan Bucknam, who is accused of a crime in Warsaw, had his case adjourned to April 6.

Kristen Bartholomew, who is accused of a crime in Warsaw, had her case adjourned to April 27 for motions.

Tiffany Baker, who committed a crime in Warsaw, successfully completed interim probation. She was sentenced on the reduced charged of promoting prison contraband in the second degree, a misdemeanor to three years probation, and fees and surcharges.

Jennifer Galioto, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, was in court for a violation of probation appearance. The case has been adjourned to March 10.

The following are from State Correctional Facilities in Attica.

Jonathan Smith had his case adjourned to April 27 for conference.

Billyray Staton had his case adjourned to April 27 for conference.

The following are from State Correctional Facilities in Attica and were in court before Mohun Feb. 28.

Mark Maussner had his case adjourned to March 7.

Jerry McLamore was in court for a bench trial. The decision has been reserved and the case is adjourned to March 15. After the hearing of a trial or the argument of a motion a judge might not immediately deliver a decision, but instead take time to review evidence and the law and deliver a decision at a later time, usually in a written form, thus reserve decision.

Friday, March 3, 2017 at 11:59 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Perry, Arcade, Warsaw.
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     Tylor J. Phinney

Tylor J. Phinney, 21, of Cheektowaga, was arrested March 1 following an investigation of an assault that happened on July 3 in the parking lot at the Jam in the Valley Concert, Varysburg. He is charged with assault in the second degree. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say Phinney is accused of striking an Angola man in the face with a beer bottle causing serious injuries. It was also said that Phinney had fled the scene of the incident. However, his DNA was obtained from the bottle, which was recovered from inside the victim’s vehicle following the assault. Phinney is currently on probation out of Wyoming County from other unrelated charges and was released back to the Wyoming County pretrial probation program. He is due in the Town of Sheldon Court at a later date. Wyoming County Probation and detectives from the Erie County Sheriff’s Department assisted with the investigation. 

Ryan J. Mosher, no age provided, of Perry, was charged March 1 with harassment in the second degree and endangering the welfare of a child. Mosher is accused of getting into a physical altercation with a female with a child present. He was released on his own recognizance.

Evan W. Hettinger, 33, of Belfast, was arrested March 1 on a warrant out of Wyoming County Family Court for failure to obey a family court support order. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say Hettinger was located in the Town of Arcade and taken into custody. He was put in Wyoming County Jail until the next available Wyoming County Family Court date.

Dakota Jurek, 23, of Delevan, was arrested Feb. 28 on a warrant out of Wyoming County Family Court for failure to obey a child support order. Deputies say Jurek was arrested in Arcade and put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $1,000 bail. He was due in Family Court March 1 or the next available date for Family Court.

Thursday, March 2, 2017 at 9:57 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, drugs, Perry, Attica, Warsaw, Arcade, DTF.

Two Perry residents were arrested recently for allegedly selling narcotics in Wyoming County, according to the Wyoming County Drug Task Force.

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     Sarah Ingalls

Sarah Ingalls, 22, was charged Feb. 23 with two counts of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree and two counts of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fifth degree. 

Ingalls is accused of selling lisdexamfetamine and methylphenidate on two different occasions last year in the Village of Perry.

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Kristen Bartholomew

Also on Feb. 23, Kristen Bartholomew, 36, was charged with criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fourth degree and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fourth degree. 

Bartholomew is accused of selling Suboxone last year in the Village of Warsaw.

Both are currently free on bail.

The Wyoming County Drug Task Force includes members from the Sheriff’s Office, as well as the Arcade, Attica, Perry and Warsaw police departments.

Suspected illegal drug activity can be reported to the confidential drug tip line at (585) 786-8965.

Wednesday, March 1, 2017 at 2:31 pm

Chelsie Simonds, 24, of Batavia, and Ronald Sachanowski, 31, of Silver Springs, were charged Feb. 27 with endangering the welfare of a child. On Feb. 27 Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies responded to a home on Route 19A in the Town of Castile to assist with an overdose call. During the investigation, deputies say they had discovered both Simonds and Sachanowski had been using an illegal substance in the home while their 2-year-old child was present. Both are due in the Town of Castile Court at a later date. Castile Fire and Rescue assisted at the scene.

Linda L. Hotchkiss, 47, of Perry, was charged Feb. 22 with forgery in the third degree by the Livingston County Sheriff’s Department. She is due in Leicester Town Court at a later date.

William A. Roll, 57, and Jennifer L. Mather, 43, both of Attica, were arrested Feb. 25 in connection with a violent domestic incident on Washington Street in the Village of Attica. Attica Police responded to the Washington Street home around 9 p.m. Feb. 25. Roll was charged with assault in the third degree and put in Wyoming County Jail on $500 cash bail or $2,500 bond. Mather was charged with harassment in the second degree and physical contact. She was released on her own recognizance with a refrain from offensive conduct order of protection. Both are due at 10 a.m. March 13 in Attica Village Court. Assisting at the scene was the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office and the New York State Police.

Kaija Wadsworth, no age provided, of Pittsford, was charged Feb. 26 with speed in zone, driving while intoxicated, driving with a BAC of .08 percent or more, and refusal to take a breath test. Wadsworth was stopped in the Village of Perry for allegedly speeding. During the investigation officers say they smelled an alcoholic beverage coming from the car. Wadsworth allegedly failed field sobriety testing and refused to blow into a pre-screen device. A chemical test was administered at the Warsaw Police Department, which allegedly showed a BAC of .09 percent. Wadsworth is due in Perry Village Court March 14.

Zachary W. Blackmon, 30, of Perry, was charged Feb. 27 with speed not reasonable and prudent, following too closely, driving while intoxicated, driving with a BAC of .08 percent or greater, and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies responded to a two car accident on Route 39, Castile, where, during their investigation, found one of the drivers allegedly intoxicated. Deputies say Blackmon was traveling southbound on Route 39 when he struck another vehicle. Following roadside field sobriety testing, Blackmon was arrested for DWI. He was taken to the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office where he allegedly provided a positive breath sample for alcohol. He is due in the Town of Castile Court March 20.

Sabrina A. Dietz, 33, of Nunda, was charged Feb. 26 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the third degree, and use of a portable electronic device. Dietz was stopped in the Town of Perry after a Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputy allegedly saw her driving while using a portable electronic device. During the stop, she was allegedly found to have a suspended license due to a failure to answer a summons in the Town of Covington. She is due in the Town of Perry Court at a later date.

Melissa A. Sachanowski, 33, of Orangeville, was charged Feb. 20 with failure to keep right, failure to dim high beams, and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree. Sachanowski was stopped on Route 77, Sheldon, after deputies allegedly saw her failing to maintain her driving lane numerous times and failing to dim her high beams to oncoming traffic. Following a roadside investigation, deputies say she was in possession of Subutex, a controlled substance similar to Suboxone. She is due in the Town of Sheldon Court at a later date.

Tuesday, February 28, 2017 at 10:36 am
posted by Howard Owens in Perry, Sports, basketball, news.

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If the Perry Yellowjackets win a sectional title this Friday, it won't be because Oakfield-Alabama didn't work hard to try and spoil their so-far-undefeated season.

The Hornets were in the game, played in Avon, until halfway through the final quarter when foul trouble took two starters off the court and Perry was able to finally pull away for a 78-63 win.

The Yellowjackets are a bigger team with Tyler Cowie, at 6' 3", 180 pounds, and Dan Elliott, 6' 4", 190 pounds, in the post, and a nearly unstoppable shot creator in Austin Croll at guard, but O-A got into their heads early, disrupting their offense with tight, aggressive coverage that led to several turnovers on steals, penalties and mental errors.

"What I noticed is a lot of teams kind of backed off them, hesitant or concerned about getting blown out, but we can’t back off," said Hornets Head Coach Ryan Stehlar. "We have to use our speed, our defense, and our intensity, so I wasn’t going to change our game plan. If we were going to go out, we were going to go out our way."

The Hornets had a lead of 16-13 at the end of the first quarter and 32-31 at the end of the half. Perry jumped out early in the third quarter, led most of the way and were head by about by five points early in the fourth quarter when O-A rallied a bit to get a single-digit lead with about five minutes left. That would be the Hornet's last lead of the night. 

"I've seen them several times this season and those guys play hard," said Perry Head Coach Phil Wyant. "We knew it was gong to be tough. They scrap, they battle, they play a lot of guys who can put it on the floor and are willing to shoot and that presented a tough match-up, especially when they’re making tough shots."

Reice Woodward and Dalton Carlsen fouled out and either because that took some defensive pressure off the Yellowjackets, or O-A fatigue or just the great talent on the Perry team, the Yellowjackets quickly pulled away and never let the Hornets get back in the game the rest of the way.

Cowie finished with 32 points, 14 rebounds, and nine blocked shots. Croll scored 24 points.

"Austin and Tyler, not only are they great players, but they do whatever it takes to find the open guy, make a play for a teammate, and get it done on the defensive end," Wyant said. "They were down there guarding two of their better players. Yeah, Austin and Tyler, I'm glad they're on our team, that's for sure."

Also for Perry, Spencer Owen scored 12 points and had 10 rebounds.

For O-A, Tylor Ohlson scored 18 points, including hitting three three-pointers. Woodward scored 15 and Carlsen scored 15.

Perry faces Cuba-Rushford on Friday for the Section V Class C title. 

"We know it's going to be a tough challenge," Wyant said.

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To purchase prints, click here.

Monday, February 27, 2017 at 10:21 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Eagle, Arcade, Gainesville, Middlebury, Perry, Warsaw.

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The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun Feb. 23.

Alan Hartman Sr., who committed a crime in Eagle, was sentenced to two-and-one-half to five years in prison and two years post-release supervision, and fees and surcharges. He was convicted of unlawful manufacture of methamphetamine in the third degree, a Class D felony. The sentence is to run consecutively to his current term.

Edward Gauthier II, who committed a crime in Arcade, pled guilty to aggravated family offense, a Class E felony. Sentencing is scheduled for May 18. An order of protection was also issued for eight years.

Nicole Fisher, who committed a crime in Arcade, was sentenced to five years probation on the conviction of attempted criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fourth degree, a Class D felony.

Tyler McMurray, who committed a crime in Eagle, was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison and fees and surcharges on the conviction of tampering with physical evidence, a Class E felony.

Amanda Washburn, who committed a crime in Gainesville, was sentenced to three years probation on the conviction of two counts of petit larceny, a misdemeanor.

Cody Eaton, who committed a crime in Middlebury, successfully completed interim probation and was sentenced on the reduced charge of driving while intoxicated. He will serve three years probation, pay a $1,000 fine, have his driver’s license revoked, and is ordered to install an ignition interlock device, plus pay fees and surcharges.

Clifford Murch, who is accused of a crime in Perry, pled not guilty to rape in the second degree, a Class D felony; and endangering the welfare of a child, a misdemeanor. An order of protection was served. Motions are scheduled April 27. Bail was set at $20,000.

Dakota Ribbeck, who committed a crime in Perry, pled guilt to rape in the third degree, a Class E felony. Sentencing is scheduled for May 18.

Chad Main, who is accused of a crime in Warsaw, pled not guilty to: aggravated unlicensed operation in the first degree; driving while intoxicated and driving while intoxicated per se, both as Class E felonies; and operating a motor vehicle without a court-ordered ignition interlock device, a Class A misdemeanor. The Per Se law is based not on the observations of the arresting police officer, but the results obtained from a breath alcohol tester. It is this result that dictates the offense as well potential certain legal presumptions. Motions are scheduled April 27. He was released on his own recognizance.

Catherine Miller, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to five years probation, 250 hours of community service, $2,189 in restitution, and fees and surcharges. She was convicted of welfare fraud in the fourth degree, a Class E felony.

Crystal Lawrence, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to three years probation and a $50 DNA fee. Restitution has been paid in full. She was convicted of welfare fraud in the fifth degree and petit larceny.

Kimberly White, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, was sentenced to 180 days in jail on the violation of conditional discharge.

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