Batavia

Monday, May 15, 2017 at 1:19 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Attica, Batavia.

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Ahhhhh…the senior prom – the date was set, the theme selected, the venue secured, the attire had been picked out for months. And even though it appears that some couples will naturally go to the prom together, Kristy Mell decided she didn’t want to leave things to chance, she was going to ask him. But Kristy decided to ask him in a creative way.

Kristy and Bo White are both seniors at Attica High School, who attended their final prom Friday night. 

On April 6, Kristy and Bo, who, as they admit, are huge Taco Bell fans, were enjoying a meal at the Batavia restaurant when Kristy asked Bo to the prom. Before sitting down to eat their meal, Kristy told Bo she had forgotten something in the car. When he sat down, she went out to retrieve it. When she came back to their table, she was holding a sign that read:

Bo, you are HOT, so, lets TACO Bout Prom? Think outside the Bun. Ingredients: You & Me.

The local franchise group, Hospitality Syracuse Inc, that owns the Batavia Taco Bell was so impressed with their creativity and passion for Taco Bell that they rolled out the red carpet for Bo, Kristy and eight of their friends on prom night.

“For us to be included for the process is awesome,” said Dennis Beutel, Rochester market manager for Hospitality Restaurant Group. “It’s such a big occasion for teens, we are glad we can make it even more memorable. It’s a nice feel good story.”

So on May 12, Bo, Kristy and friends were picked up in a sleek white limousine, courtesy of Taco Bell, and driven to the Batavia restaurant. When the teens arrived, they were greeted by management from the franchise, but also walked a red carpet to the front door. 

The students all received a Taco Bell swag bag loaded with a Taco Bell T-shirt, beach ball, sunglasses, a $25 Taco Bell gift card and more. Additionally, they all enjoyed pre-prom appetizers, courtesy of the establishment, before being whisked off to their prom in Buffalo.

“We are grateful for Kristy and Bo’s passion and love for Taco Bell and are honored to be able to help them celebrate this special day,” said Steve Pinkerton, Hospitality Syracuse vice president/owner.

According to Kristy’s mom, Kristen Kriger, the pair are always together and she just wanted to do something different.

“We are really surprised they did this,” Kristy said. 

“It’s really cool they did this,” Bo said. “It’s really rad. We’re super stoked.”

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Thursday, March 23, 2017 at 3:41 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Attica, Batavia.

Two men, allegedly identifying themselves as police officers, are accused of breaking into a home on Swan Street in Batavia at 2:22 a.m. today. 

Police say the pair then attacked the occupants, causing physically injury.

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      Kolton Cotter

Kolton Cotter, 22, of Albion, was charged with: robbery; burglary; coercion; conspiracy; criminal possession of a weapon; criminal impersonation; petit larceny; criminal mischief; assault; possession of burglary tools; unlawful imprisonment; criminal obstruction of breathing; obstruction of governmental administration; resisting arres; and unlawful possession of marijuana.

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      Andrew Morris

Andrew Morris, 19, of Attica, was charged with: robbery; burglary; coercion; conspiracy; criminal possession of a weapon; criminal impersonation; petit larceny; assault; possession of burglar tools; and unlawful possession of marijuana.

As reported on the Wyoming County Free Press sister site The Batavian, officers Darryl Streeter and Frank Klimjack responded to the report of a break-in in progress and found Morris inside the residence and took him into custody. Cotter fled and was chased by Klimjack.  

Klimjack caught up with him on Graham Street and deployed a Taser to help subdue him. Cotter was transported by Mercy EMS to UMMC for evaluation.

Batavia PD said Morris and Cotter identified themselves as undercover police officers in an attempt to steal property.

At one point, a suspect reportedly told the victims that at least one of them was armed. Police did not report recovering a firearm. The type of weapon recovered was not identified by police.

The suspects were arraigned in Batavia City Court and jailed without bail.

Thursday, November 17, 2016 at 3:00 pm
posted by lisa@thebatavian.com in Sponsored Post, advertisement, Foxprowl-Con, Comics, Foxprowl, Batavia.


Batavia's own Comic-Con! Celebrities, toy, comic, video game, electronics, jewelry, anime vendors, artists & more! Dozens of FREE activities, Q&A's, live music, panels, programming, games, cosplay costume contests & more! Professional Star Wars, Ghostbusters & Ninja Turtles costume groups!

Tickets only $10 Friday, $20 Saturday, $15 Sunday, $30 3-Day pass! Kids 12 & under FREE w/paid adult! Great family fun! Click here for more information. Like us on Facebook for future updates and information.

Friday, August 12, 2016 at 1:46 pm

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Police chiefs from throughout Western New York were in Batavia today for a golf tournament at Terry Hills.

The gathering of the Western New York Association of Chiefs of Police is a social event and networking opportunity, said Batavia PD's Chief Shawn Heubusch, who helped organize the tournament.

Pictured are: Doug Richardson, Rob Ruffner, John Applebee, Bobby Lapidus, playing as a foursome, along with organizers Pete Hoffmeister, left, chief in Warsaw, Heubusch, second from right, and Tony Biscaro, far right, chief of Arcade.

Tuesday, August 9, 2016 at 10:09 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, hazardous waste, recycling, Batavia.

Press release:

The GLOW Region Solid Waste Management Committee will hold a single Household Hazardous Waste Collection Sept. 17 in Batavia. Funding is provided by GLOW’s County contributions and a grant from the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation with assistance from the Genesee County Sheriff’s Department and Covanta Niagara. 

Residents from the GLOW region (Genesee, Livingston and Wyoming counties) are eligible to participate.

Materials accepted include: household cleaning products; pesticides/insecticides; oil-base paint/stains; vehicle batteries and fluids (except motor oil); oil filters; pool chemicals; driveway sealer; and home computers, TVs, and microwaves. (Note: No more than two CRT TVs and or monitors per registrant can be accepted.) There is no charge for this service. 

Passenger/light truck tires will be accepted for $4 each and truck tires for $10 each. For the seventh year, pharmaceutical waste – outdated, unwanted or unusable medicines – will be accepted. 

Items that will not be accepted include: latex paint, used motor oil, empty containers, asbestos, and household batteries.

Appointments are required on a first-come, first-serve basis. A total of 600 spots are available. For details and additional information call the GLOW office at (585) 815-7906 or 800-836-1154 or (585) 344-2580, ext. 5463.

Friday, July 29, 2016 at 3:00 pm
posted by lisa@thebatavian.com in Sponsored Post, advertisement, Glow Corporate Cup, Batavia, ny..


Register today for our 4th annual Glow Corporate Cup!

At 6 p.m. Aug. 4, Merrill Lynch in Batavia will sponsor the fourth annual GLOW Corporate Cup. Each year local businesses form teams to compete in a 5K race wherein the company with the lowest combined time takes home the GLOW cup. Following the race is the region’s largest office party. Businesses are encouraged to set up tents in Centennial Park, bring refreshments and prepare to have a great time as they mingle with other local companies. Live music is provided as runners and supporters enjoy the post race “AfterGLOW.” 

Last year, the race included 700 runners and more than 1,000 people participated in the post-race celebration. In the first two years more than $30,000 was raised for the GLOW YMCA and this year event is expected to exceed last year's total in participants and funds raised.

“Our purpose is to bring the businesses of the GLOW region together for a common cause,” said Joshua Dent, one of the race organizers. “The after-party was intended to celebrate the outstanding companies we have in the region that are giving back to their community.” 

The GLOW YMCA serves the communities of Genesee, Livingston, Orleans, and Wyoming counties.

“This year we would like to see even more participants from beyond Genesee County,” Dent said.

Registration is $25 per person and individuals must be 18 or older to participate. The route has been certified as a USA Track and Field Course. All funds raised go toward programs for the GLOW YMCA. Register today! Click here for more information. Questions concerning the event may be sent to: info@glowcorporatecup.org

Monday, July 11, 2016 at 5:16 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Middlebury, Linden, Batavia, World War II, Germany.

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On July 4, 1944, 1st Lt. Leonard B. Fuller had written in a letter home: 

Well anyway, as I set here looking at these pictures it sure brings back some swell memories of all the hell raising and work I have done around home there. The picture of Doug by the garage there is o.k.! I sure would like to have my picture taken in that same spot.

It was evident in Leonard Fuller’s letters that he was very homesick, as he wrote about it often. His father would send him pictures of the farm, complete with captions. The photo he was referring to was of his young nephew Dougie Fuller.

On July 7, 1944, his P-51 Mustang was hit by flak over Blankenhain, Germany. The exploding shells shot from the ground forced Fuller to bail out of his aircraft. During his descent, his parachute collapsed when he appeared to be trying to avoid some trees and a barn. Subsequently, he fell to his death and was buried in the Old Cemetery in Blankenhain.

On Sunday afternoon, under an azure sky dotted with large white, fluffy clouds, friends and family gathered at the West Middlebury Cemetery on Koppe Road, East Bethany, to honor Fuller. Just two days prior, a similar event took place in Weimer, Germany. 

Citizens from two different countries, divided by war more than 70 years ago, united to pay their final respects to an American soldier.

Around April 2015, Bernd Schmidt, a historian from Weimer, contacted Donna Bonning. Bonning, who had been working on a project for the Sons of the American Revolution, posted a photo of Fuller’s tombstone on the Findagrave website in 2006. Come to find out, Schmidt had seen the photo she had posted and emailed her. Through several exchanges of emails and after finding a treasure of letters, photos documents, and a few artifacts in Wayne Fuller’s attic, a nephew of Leonard’s, the puzzle pieces of the last days of a local veteran began to form a picture.

“I enjoy photographing tombstones and sharing the photos with others,” Bonning said. “Once in awhile I have come across stones that cause me to stop and take a second look. Leonard's stone was one of those. But my thoughts didn't drift very far beyond those engraved letters and beautiful wings. I never really stopped to think about what he was like as a person. What his life was like. Who his family was. What was the meaning behind those words...Forever Honored. Forever Mourned. 

“I found out what that meant the day I laid eyes on the Missing in Action and Killed in Action telegrams that Wayne told me about. I 'met' Leonard on the day we opened up a box from the attic and saw the black and white photo of him in his dress uniform.”

Leonard apparently had quite a sense of humor as well.

Dec. 20, 1942

Well, I just got my picture in the noon mail so when I get to the post office to get some airmail stamps I will send it home. Get a load of General McArthur in the ruff.

Jan. 1, 1943

I got a letter from Betty yesterday and she said that she received my picture. From what she said about it, I think I better get up there and take care of things. Me, I like to have people tell me nice things like that to my face. I suppose I will have to put up with it because I realize that I am quite naturally good looking. Well, why shouldn't I be good looking? Look at my mom and pop. I should get at least a quarter for that remark.

Not only did Leonard miss his home and family, he was also a very patriotic man. On May 28, 1944 he wrote:

Say, you know I wish a lot of people in the States could see some of these forces that go over into Germany day after day. Boy, it really gives me a thrill to know that I am fighting with an outfit like we have over here. When you can see a thousand bombers in the air along with as many fighters, it really gives a guy the idea that there are others around that are over there for the same reason. Every time I go over there I thank my lucky stars that I am an American all the way around. 

In a witness statement from Air Corps Capt. Leslie D. Minchen of the 357 Fighter Squadron, 355 Fighter Group, Station F-122 dated July 7, 1944, Minchen wrote:

I was leading Custard Squadron when we attacked fifty plus Me 410’s. Lt. Fuller was flying number three in my flight. The F/A led us over a town where we got heavy accurate flak at about 7,000 feet. Capt. Haviland, who was flying my wing saw him jettison his canopy, but did not see him get out. Lt. Fuller called me on the radio and said he was getting out. I answered his call and he said he was okay. I did not see him bail out. Air Corps Capt. Leslie D. Minchen.

In 1949 the pilot’s parents, Buell and Clara Fuller, traveled through the Iron Curtain (via Russia) to visit his gravesite and sprinkled dirt from the family farm on his grave – taking small comfort in the fact that he was resting in at least some American soil.

An excerpt from an article written in the Farm Journal, May 1951, recounts the visit of Buell and Clara and a description of the events which lead to the first lieutenant’s demise:

The cemetery comes into view...The caretaker’s cottage is only a few feet from their son’s grave. Ten “foreign” solders are buried in the little plot: French, Italian and one American – Leonard B. Fuller. 

A wooden framework encloses the Fuller grave, within which a fine-leaved boarder of green, carefully trimmed, sets off a bed of marigolds. Grouped around the white cross are delicate waxen blossoms of tuberous begonias...

...The villagers watched the two planes fighting to a finish. Suddenly the American plane was hit, and from it parachuted the pilot. He seemed to be maneuvering to avoid a clump of trees and a barn, to land in a cleared filed beyond. About 200 feel from the ground, the ‘chute suddenly collapsed and crashed to earth. They rushed to help him, but he had died instantly...

“The passage of time doesn’t make these things easier,” said Genesee County Historian Michael Eula, Ph.D. “His life resonated with me on several levels. I saw, in photos, a man shouldering responsibilities a young man should never have. They rose to meet the challenge of war.

“The conflict was not to be seen as what it was against, but what it was for...Freedom to enjoy liberties...The war was about a daily reality of what one was sure of and familiar: To return home for a meal, their girl, family, and friends. The ultimate tribute would be that maybe someday, the sacrifice of those like Fuller’s would be to avoid the sacrifice of so many of young people. May they never be forgotten.”

Leonard flew 40 missions in the P-51 Mustang and logged in 180 combat hours in a four-month time period.

According to Acepilots.com, North American Aviation originally designed the Mustang in response to a British (England) specification. The first prototype was started in April 1940 and was delivered to England for test flights by the end of 1941.

The first Mustangs were powered by the Allison V-1710 engine. While it was a good engine, it didn’t operate well at high altitudes. 

In April 1942, a British test pilot, Ronald Harker, while impressed with the plane, suggested that it would be a natural fit with the Rolls Royce Merlin 60-series engine – well-suited to high altitudes. The first Merlin-equipped Mustang, the P-51B, flew in November 1942. At 30,000 feet, the plane reached 440 mph, almost 100 mph faster than the Allison-equipped Mustang at that altitude. 

As it worked out, Craig Wadsworth, of the Geneseo War Planes Museum, was instrumental in having not one, but three P-51s do a “flyover” during the memorial ceremony.

“When I spoke with the pilot for Quick Silver at the airshow, Scott “Scooter” Yoak, said he was going to bring along a few friends,” Bonning said. “Could it be any more amazing than that? In spirit I think of Leonard and two of his fighter pilot friends. One being Francis Eshelman who took the very last picture of Leonard’s P-51 – named MYRT II; and the other being Joe Engelbreit, who wrote a letter home to Leonard’s parent’s a month after his plane was lost. He still had no idea that Leonard was declared KIA (killed in action).

“When I see the one (photo) of Joe I imagine that he is looking to the sky and thinking of his friend and hoping his friend makes it back okay. They all flew in the same missions together.”

In a letter dated July 8, 1944, Air Corps Capt. W. H. Rush sent a “Missing Aircrew Report” to Commanding Officer, 355th Fighter Group, AAF Station F-122, APO No. 637. It stated in part: 

On July 7, 1944, at 0635 hours, Lt. Fuller piloting aircraft OS-E, took off from this field on an operational mission with the 357th Fighter Squadron. His call sign was Custard 82... This office had no radio contact with Lt. Fuller during the flight.

When Lt. Fuller failed to return to this base with the 357th Fighter Squadron, this office immediately notified combat operations.

Every effort was made to contact Lt. Fuller...

Leonard was born in May 1921 in Linden. He attended Linden grade school, graduated from Batavia High School in 1939, and belonged to the Bethany Grange. He enlisted in Air Corps on Oct. 20, 1942 in Buffalo. He trained in San Antonio, Uvalde, San Angelo and Mission, all in Texas.

On Oct. 1, 1943 he was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant. On Feb. 29, 1944 he sailed for England and was based at Steeple-Morden Field with the 8th Air Force 357 Squadron, 355 Group, 65 Wing Fighter. 

At the time of his death, he was credited with destroying seven-and-one-half planes and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, and the Purple Heart.

In September 1950, his remains were brought to the United States and buried in the family lot in West Middlebury Cemetery. 

Although Wayne didn’t know his uncle, the loss of the man hit him at the laying of the wreath, and noted, with a slight twinkle in his eye, that part of his plane is buried with him.

In a recent email sent to Bonning, Schmidt wrote:

After 72 years we in Germany also wish to think of the victims of this war because we have these so-called enemies to THANK for our freedom and the ending of the war.

The old and young inhabitants of Blankenhain where Leonard crashed on July 7, 1944 and where he was buried for some years are very interested in information about Leonard. After all, the crash in their town is also a part of their history. And hatred and being enemies are long forgotten.

This past week…on July 8th, residents and guests of Blankenhain held a ceremony of remembrance for American Airman Leonard Fuller at the Old Cemetery in Blankenhain where he was buried for six years. Up until recently he was almost forgotten and unknown. However he now has a name again; we know his story and the suffering of his parents. Leonard is also not forgotten in Germany.

See related: Honoring the sacrifice of a fallen hero

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Editor's note: The above two photos were submitted by Donna Bonning.

Monday, December 21, 2015 at 4:50 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, Troop A, Batavia, State Police.

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Press release:

Major Steven A. Nigrelli, a 25 year veteran of the New York State Police, is the new Troop A commander. He will oversee the State Police operations in the eight counties of Western New York. Under his command will be more than 400 civilian and sworn personnel.

Starting his career in 1990, Nigrelli first served as a uniform trooper in Troop D in Central New York until he was assigned to the Community Narcotics Enforcement Team (CNET) in 1994.

Nigrelli was assigned to CNET in both Western and Central New York, working undercover for more than before being promoted to Sergeant and Investigator in 1999. At that time, he was assigned to Troop A Bureau of Criminal Investigation (BCI).

In 2003 while in Troop A, he received his promotion to lieutenant and was assigned to supervise the Troop A's BCI.

In March of 2007, Nigrelli was promoted to captain, accepting an assignment as the Troop A Zone III commander at State Police (SP) Jamestown. In 2008, he was reassigned as the Troop A Zone II commander at SP Clarence. As a zone commander, Nigrelli was responsible for overseeing all uniform operations in his zone.

In 2012, he was promoted to BCI captain for Troop A at Troop A Headquarters in Batavia. Throughout his career, Captain Nigrelli has had the opportunity to work on several high-profile cases, including numerous homicides, Ralph “Bucky” Phillips manhunt, Bike Path Rapist/Killer Task Force, and he served as the scene commander for the investigation of the crash of Continental Flight #3407.

Major Nigrelli has been committed to community service and volunteerism throughout his State Police career. He has dedicated his time and energy to volunteering for Special Olympics and currently sits as both the New York State Torch Run director and International Executive Council Board of Directors for Special Olympics. These organizations are dedicated to raising both funds and awareness for Special Olympics which is comprised of children and adults with individuals with intellectual disabilities.

Prior to joining the State Police, Major Nigrelli briefly served as member of the Buffalo Housing Police and earned a bachelor's degree from Buffalo State College.

Monday, November 23, 2015 at 4:33 pm
posted by Howard Owens in crime, Attica, Batavia.

An Attica woman who was arrested for attempting to bite an emergency room nurse and punching her several times in the stomach will spend at least a year-and-a-half in State Prison after pleading guilty this morning to attempted assault in the second degree.

In an unusual twist, she was also sentenced today.

Kerri L. Forsberg, 43, of Alexander Road, Attica, who appeared in Genesee County Court in a wheelchair, has medical issues that meant she couldn't be housed in any of the county jails Genesee County uses to hold female inmates. In those circumstances, the state will hold an unsentenced inmate, and at no cost to the county, said District Attorney Lawrence Friedman.

The difficulty, however, is that Forsberg was held in Bedford, and Genesee County deputies were required to take her back and forth between the prison and her court appearances.

So some of her appearances were actually waived, including her plea-cutoff. She was planning to take her case to trial, Friedman explained, but when she changed her mind and decided to take the plea offer, arrangements were made for Forsberg to enter her plea and be sentenced on the same day.

Friedman said the Probation Department was "great" for their handling of the expedited pre-sentence investigation. Investigators obtained the case file this morning, combined it with Forsberg's PSI from a previous case in Wyoming County, and were able to meet the deadline of 4 p.m. for the completed report.

Forsberg is eligible for release in one-and-a-half years, but could serve up to three years. She was sentenced as a second felony offender.

She was arrested in early July for attempting to bite a UMMC nurse and punching her in the stomach.

Friday, July 17, 2015 at 7:54 pm
posted by Howard Owens in crime, Batavia, Attica.

A 30-year-old Attica resident will spend at least the next year of his life in state prison for a burglary in Batavia last November, though he would rather spend the time with his young son.

Jason L. Cramer, Sr., told judge Genesee County Court Judge Robert C. Noonan that he knows he has a drug problem, but that's no excuse of his criminal activity.

"I know what I did is wrong," Cramer said. "I intend to use whatever time you give me as a time to better myself and become a better man."

His attorney, Fred Rarick, said Cramer started using heroin when he was 16.

"He continued to use heroin even though he knew it might lead to his death, even though he knew that it might lead, as it could today, to time in prison," Rarick said. "In spite of that, he's been unable to combat his addiction."

Rarick said he thought his client would benefit from rehabilitation programs available through the Department of Corrections. 

Noonan sentenced Cramer to an indeterminate one to three years, which is a slightly less than the maximum sentence available to the judge.

Friday, May 22, 2015 at 3:00 pm
posted by lisa@thebatavian.com in Sponsored Post, advertisement, Glow Corporate Cup, Batavia, NY.

Register today for our 3rd annual Glow Corporate Cup!
At 6 p.m. Aug. 6, Merrill Lynch in Batavia will sponsor the third annual GLOW Corporate Cup. Each year local businesses form teams to compete in a 5K race wherein the company with the lowest combined time takes home the GLOW cup. Following the race is the region’s largest office party. Businesses are encouraged to set up tents in Centennial Park, bring refreshments and prepare to have a great time as they mingle with other local companies. Live music is provided as runners and supporters enjoy the post race “AfterGLOW.” 

Last year, the race included 700 runners and more than 1,000 people participated in the post-race celebration. In the first two years more than $30,000 was raised for the GLOW YMCA and this year event is expected to exceed last year's total in participants and funds raised.

“Our purpose is to bring the businesses of the GLOW region together for a common cause,” said Joshua Dent, one of the race organizers. “The after-party was intended to celebrate the outstanding companies we have in the region that are giving back to their community.” 

The GLOW YMCA serves the communities of Genesee, Livingston, Orleans, and Wyoming counties.

“This year we would like to see even more participants from beyond Genesee County,” Dent said.

Registration is $25 per person and individuals must be 18 or older to participate. The route has been certified as a USA Track and Field Course. All funds raised go toward programs for the GLOW YMCA. Register today! Click here for more information. Questions concerning the event may be sent to: info@glowcorporatecup.org

Thursday, April 9, 2015 at 4:42 pm
posted by Howard Owens in crime, Perry, Batavia.
 

WATCH: Stephen Pike, the 18-year-old accused of digging up his father's grave, explains why he did it.Read more HERE: http://spr.ly/61894Zt5

Posted by 13 WHAM ABC on Thursday, April 9, 2015

From The Wyoming County Free Press news partner, 13WHAM.

Steve Pike, the 18-year-old Perry resident charged with aggravated cemetery desecration, explained today why he dug up his father's urn at St. Joseph Cemetery.

I get it," Pike said. "They might have saw disrespect, but he's my father. I think the urn is right under only about that deep under. I never even thought I would be as close to my dad as I was. I got his jacket. I got his Coca-Cola stuff. I got all this stuff, but you know you want closure." 

Pike's father died in 2006. 

"I can't find anybody. Nobody really gets it. So I went over to the cemetery and I just grabbed a shovel. Little, not a big shovel. Just lifted up the dirt, put up the grass, and I found it and I kind of just broke down emotionally right there, and I'm like, 'Wow, Dad,'" he said. "I never thought I would be that close to my dad. I can't hug him. If his body was under there and not his ashes, I'm not going to dig up his body."

Pike turned himself in today. He was issued an appearance ticket and released.

Monday, February 16, 2015 at 6:44 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Attica, Batavia.
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 Joshua Pehrson

Joshua T. Pehrson, 29, of Batavia, was charged with attempted assault in the first degree, a Class C felony; criminal obstruct breathing, menacing in the second degree and criminal possession of a weapon in the fourth degree, all Class A misdemeanors. The Attica Police Department responded to an alleged domestic incident in the parking lot of the Tops Market, Attica. While officers were responding to the call, several additional 911 calls were placed reporting that a female was being stabbed in the store. Pehrson allegedly choked his girlfriend, who is an employee of Tops, while they were in his vehicle, which was parked in the Tops parking lot. The female reportedly broke free from Pehrson and returned to the store. Pehrson allegedly followed her into the store where he allegedly choked her again and allegedly attempted to stab her with a pair of scissors. Store employees and customers aided the victim, freeing her from Pehrson and held him until police arrived. The female sustained minor injuries and received medical attention at the scene. Pehrson was committed to the Wyoming County Jail on $25,000 cash bail or $50,000 property bond. He is due in the Village of Attica Court at 10 a.m. March 9. A felony hearing is set for 7 p.m. Thursday. Any customer who witnessed the incident or aided the victim is asked to contact the Attica Police Department at (585) 591-0881.

Thursday, December 18, 2014 at 1:28 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Silver Springs, Warsaw, Batavia.
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James R. Allen  

James R. Allen, 30, Silver Springs, was charged with attempted assault in the second-degree, a Class E felony, and obstruction of a governmental administration in the second-degree, a Class A misdemeanor. Allen was arrested following an alleged complaint at 49 Railroad Ave, Silver Springs, after a welfare check was conducted at his home. As police walked Allen to a patrol vehicle he allegedly became combative and allegedly began screaming and trying to get away. When Allen was in the patrol vehicle he allegedly forcefully kicked at police, making contact four times. Allen was committed to the Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $2,500 cash bail or $10,000 bond. Allen is due, Jan. 12, 2015, in the Village of Silver Springs Court.

Jeremiah J. Cieszynski, 27, and Sally M. Sims, 24, both of Warsaw, were charged with petit larceny. The pair was detained by Kmart security in the Town of Batavia for allegedly stealing clothing and sneakers with an approximate value of $125. Sims and Cieszynski are due at a later date in the Town of Batavia Court.

Friday, November 14, 2014 at 9:28 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Silver Springs, Attica, Batavia.

Toby Weatherbee, 38, of Silver Springs, is charged with driving while intoxicated, driving with a blood alcohol content above .08 percent and speed in zone. Weatherbee was stopped on Cummings Avenue, Silver Springs, for allegedly traveling 63 mph in a 30-mph zone. During the traffic stop, Weatherbee was given a roadside field sobriety test, which he allegedly failed and a breath test which allegedly showed a BAC above .08 percent. Weatherbee is due in the Village of Silver Springs Court Jan. 5.

Michael W. Leroy, 24, of Attica, was charged with aggravated unlicensed operation in the third-degree and unlawful possession of marijuana. Leroy was allegedly operating a motor vehicle on Main Street, Attica, with a known suspended driver’s license. Following a traffic stop, Leroy was allegedly found to be in possession of marijuana. Leroy is due at 1:30 p.m. Dec. 8 in the Village of Attica Court.

Ronnie J. Sumeriski II, 32, of Batavia, was charged with aggravated unlicensed operation of a vehicle in the third-degree and uninspected motor vehicle. Sumeriski was allegedly observed operating a motor vehicle on Main Street, Attica, with an expired inspection sticker. During the traffic stop, Sumeriski was allegedly found to have two active suspensions on his driver’s license. Sumeriski is scheduled at 1:30 p.m. Dec. 8 in the Village of Attica Court.

Wednesday, October 8, 2014 at 8:39 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Warsaw, Batavia.

Jason F. Holmes, 32, and Heather M. Castrechino, 38, both of West Buffalo Street, Warsaw, were each charged with two counts of endangering the welfare of a child. According to a Warsaw Police report, officers were called to their residence Oct. 2 for a domestic dispute and found unhealthy living conditions. They were put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $5,000 bail each and are scheduled to appear in the Village of Warsaw Court on Oct. 20 to answer the charges. Wyoming County Department of Social Services assisted at the scene.

Justin M. Johnson, 24, of Batavia, was arrested on a bench warrant out of the Village of Warsaw Court for failure to appear on Oct. 2.. Johnson was put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $500 bail. The City of Batavia Police assisted in the arrest.

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