events

Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 6:39 pm
Event Date and Time: 
April 29, 2017 - 9:00am

You might be a firefighter if your kids are afraid to get into a water fights with you. Author Unknown.

Humor is a firefighters greatest defense against the images they see when responding to a call, say many of the men and women who make up the all-volunteer fire departments in Wyoming County. 

Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 6:38 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, Fire Department, events, emergency services, fire.
Event Date and Time: 
April 28, 2017 - 9:00am

You might be a firefighter if your kids are afraid to get into a water fights with you. Author Unknown.

Humor is a firefighters greatest defense against the images they see when responding to a call, say many of the men and women who make up the all-volunteer fire departments in Wyoming County. 

Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 6:35 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Fire Department, emergency services, fire.

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You might be a firefighter if your kids are afraid to get into a water fights with you. Author Unknown.

Humor is a firefighters greatest defense against the images they see when responding to a call, say many of the men and women who make up the all-volunteer fire departments in Wyoming County. 

This Saturday and Sunday, fire departments and companies around the county, and the state, are hosting open houses for RecruitNY. According to its Web site, volunteers are vital for every department to keep the fire service alive. Since its inception, RecruitNY has helped add more than 20,000 to the ranks of fire departments across the state. 

Departments hosting events Saturday include:

    • Attica Fire Department, 11 Water St., Attica, from noon to 4 p.m.;

    • Bliss (No. 1 Eagle Hose Co.) Fire Department, 6655 Route 362, Bliss, from noon to 2 p.m.;

    • Castile Fire Department, 37 N. Main St., Castile, from noon to 2 p.m.;

    • North Java Fire Department, 4274 Route 98, North Java, from noon to 3 p.m.; 

    • Perry Fire Department, 46 N. Main St., Perry, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.;

    • Sheldon Fire Department, 996 Centerline Road, Strykersville, from 2 to 4 p.m.;

    • Varysburg Fire Department, 2446 Route 98, Varysburg, from 10 to 2 p.m.;

    • Warsaw Fire Department, 40 E. Buffalo St., Warsaw, from noon to 5 p.m.; 

    • Wyoming Hook & Ladder Co, 26 Maple St., Wyoming, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and

    • Perry Ambulance, 11 Mill St., Perry, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Departments hosting events Sunday include:

    • Arcade Fire Department, 145 North St., Arcade, from noon to 4 p.m.;

    • Bennington Fire Company, 1353 Route 354, Attica,  from noon to 3 p.m.;

    • Cowlesville Fire Department, 361 Clinton St., Cowlesville, from noon to 4 p.m.;

    • Gainesville Fire Department, 2 East St., Gainesville, from noon to 2 p.m.;

    • Harris Corners Fire Department, 585 Route 20A, Strykersville, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.;

    • Pike Fire Department, 67 E. Main St., Pike, from 2 to 5 p.m.;

    • Silver Springs Fire Department, 43 N. Main St., Silver Springs, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; and 

    • Strykersville Fire Department, 594 Minkel Road, Strykersville, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

For more information, call Wyoming County Emergency Management, (585) 786-8867.

Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 5:40 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Warsaw, CCE.
Event Date and Time: 
May 11, 2017 - 7:00pm

The Board of Directors of the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Wyoming County meeting scheduled for May 25 has been changed to May 11 at 7 p.m. at the Ag and Business Center, 36 Center St., Warsaw.

For questions, call (585) 786-2251 extension 117.

Monday, April 24, 2017 at 8:04 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Warsaw, education.
Event Date and Time: 
April 25, 2017 - 7:00pm

 The Warsaw Central Scholl District is hosting a Capital Project 2017 community information meeting Tuesday, at 7 pm in the elementary school, Buffalo Street, Warsaw.

Monday, April 24, 2017 at 8:00 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, events, Warsaw, summer.

Press release:

Camp Invention, a nationally recognized, nonprofit summer enrichment camp program, is coming to Warsaw Central School the week of Aug. 7 through 10. Regional program sponsors include Greene Medical Arts Pharmacy.

Camp Invention is a program of the National Inventors Hall of Fame and supported by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). The nonprofit organization is dedicated to recognizing inventors and invention, promoting creativity, and advancing the spirit of innovation and entrepreneurship. What makes this camp truly unique is that the curriculum is inspired by the Inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

For students entering kindergarten through sixth grade, Camp Invention is a weeklong adventure that turns the summer from ordinary to extraordinary through hands-on problem solving, collaboration, and the use of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

Inventive young minds can exercise their creativity and use their imagination, all while learning and developing new skills they typically don’t get to use in the classroom. Children are empowered to have big ideas while they take on challenges that inspire them to question, brainstorm, work as a team and build amazing invention prototypes.

“Parents should send their children to Camp Invention because it encourages children to think, solve and create!” said a mother of three campers. “Teamwork is encouraged while individual strengths are fostered. My children gained a deeper love for science and engineering, confidence to try new and innovative ideas, made new friendships, and learned new science vocabulary and concepts.”

This year’s curriculum features several hands-on modules:

    • Duct Tape Billionaire: Campers design duct tape products they can market and sell to mock investors;

    • Have a Blast:  Children build high-tech Bubble Blasters and compete as a team in friendly air battles that use physics to boost their advantage;

    • Mission Space Makers: Teams hatch eggs, sprout living plants and grow crystal trees, all while on a mission to locate and prepare a new planet for human habitation; and

    • Operation Keep Out: Campers learn to reverse engineer old machines and devices, and use their parts to create the ultimate Spy Gadget Alarm Box.

All local Camp Invention programs are facilitated and taught by certified educators who reside and teach in the community. The camp serves more than 130,000 students every year and partners with more than 1,400 schools and districts across the nation. For additional information or to find the nearest camp, visit campinvention.org.

Monday, April 24, 2017 at 5:52 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Perry Center, Perry.

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For more than 50 years, members of the Perry Center Fire Department have dished up chicken for the community. Midmorning Sunday, cars lined up three-deep and circled around Perry Center’s fire hall with approximately 30 or so more cars lined up along Route 246. Patrons were ready for the department’s annual Spring Chicken Barbecue.

At 8:10 a.m. the match was thrown and the grill began to warm. Shortly thereafter, deft hands began placing the first of 550 half chickens on the grates above the smoldering fire. By 11 a.m., people began lining up. Around 11:30, the first chicken was taken off the grill to finish steaming in the pot. And by noon, the first customer received their order.

“We used to hold the event in the community hall,” said Fire Chief Harold Wright. “Several years ago, we decided to try the drive through. People don’t even have to get out of the car. It makes it convenient.”

The semiannual event is renowned as one of the department’s biggest fundraisers. Proceeds from the barbecue are used to buy gear and equipment.

“We have loyal people come back year after year for the barbecue,” Wright said. “It’s a great community. Most times, we are sold out in lass than an hour.”

While the chief wouldn’t divulge the department’s chicken recipe, he did say his old Ag teacher used to “do barbecue” and he created the sauce for it. One of Perry Center’s members bought the teacher’s business but the he continued to make the sauce. Only now, he does it for the fire department.

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Thursday, April 20, 2017 at 3:37 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Food, Business.

Press release:

Looking for “great food and warm hospitality” close to home? Get ready for the second annual Wyoming County Restaurant Week starting April 30 and running through May 6. Hosted by the Wyoming County Chamber & Tourism Office and local media, the event is countywide.

Participating restaurants will be offering a unique dish or dishes throughout the week at the special price of $20.17. Each restaurant will create its own restaurant week menu, which could include anything from a single entrée to a multi-course meal.

“We’re very excited to be partnering again on this fun event and thank the restaurants for being involved. What better way for our restaurants to showcase all of the great menu items that they have available,” said Chamber President Scott Gardner.

“We have some of the best restaurants in Western New York right here in our backyard, and this is a great way to celebrate all that they have to offer and encourage diners to try something new. Thanks to all the event partners and everyone who works to makes this event a success.”

More information, weekly specials, and the full list of participating restaurants can be found at www.wyomingcountyrestaurantweek.com or www.gowyomingcountyny.com or by calling the Chamber at (585) 786-0307.

Thursday, April 20, 2017 at 3:24 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, outdoors, nature, Letchworth State Park.
Event Date and Time: 
May 6, 2017 - 9:00am

More than 120 state parks and historic sites are participating in the sixth annual Parks & Trails New York and NY State Parks I Love My Park Day, May 6. 

Thursday, April 20, 2017 at 1:05 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Warsaw, quilting, crafts, arts.
Event Date and Time: 
April 21, 2017 - 4:00pm

The Wyoming County Chamber and Tourism will be hosting a ribbon cutting ceremony at The Gathering Quarters, 63 Perry Ave., Warsaw, at 4 p.m. April 21.

The Gathering Quarters is a “home away from home” to visit with friends and create. The home is geared toward quilters and crafters, sleeps eight guests, offers a full kitchen, four bedrooms, and one and a half baths. The Gathering Quarters also offers sturdy tables to gather around and sew, craft and scrapbook and enjoy the company of friends.

Thursday, April 20, 2017 at 12:37 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Perry, Business.
Event Date and Time: 
April 29, 2017 -
8:00am to 12:00pm

Shane and Tara Harding of Harding’s Plumbing and Heating Inc, 34 N. Main St., Perry, is celebrating their business expansion and relocation with an open house from noon to 4 p.m. April 28 and a ribbon cutting at 1 p.m., and an open house from 8 a.m. to noon April 29.

Thursday, April 20, 2017 at 12:36 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Perry, Business.
Event Date and Time: 
April 28, 2017 -
12:00pm to 4:00pm

Shane and Tara Harding of Harding’s Plumbing and Heating Inc, 34 N. Main St., Perry, is celebrating their business expansion and relocation with an open house from noon to 4 p.m. April 28 and a ribbon cutting at 1 p.m., and an open house from 8 a.m. to noon April 29.

Tuesday, April 18, 2017 at 12:14 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Perry.

The Perry Fire Department is hosting its first Spring Fest April 29 and 30 at the Perry Village Park, Lake Street.

On Saturday, a craft and vendor show will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; a chicken barbecue is scheduled from noon until sold out – tickets are on sale now; a 5K run/walk is scheduled for a 9 a.m. start with registration at 8 a.m.; and at noon, check out the fire truck pull.

Sunday’s events include the craft show from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; a hamburger and hotdog stand will be on the grounds from 11 a.m. until sold out; and a cornhole tournament begins at 1 p.m. with teams registering at noon.

For more information on the fest or for chicken barbecue tickets contact Tammy Kelsey at (585) 721-2024.

Tuesday, April 18, 2017 at 12:13 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Perry.
Event Date and Time: 
April 30, 2017 -
9:00am to 4:00pm

The Perry Fire Department is hosting its first Spring Fest April 29 and 30 at the Perry Village Park, Lake Street.

On Saturday, a craft and vendor show will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; a chicken barbecue is scheduled from noon until sold out – tickets are on sale now; a 5K run/walk is scheduled for a 9 a.m. start with registration at 8 a.m.; and at noon, check out the fire truck pull.

Tuesday, April 18, 2017 at 12:13 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Perry.
Event Date and Time: 
April 29, 2017 -
9:00am to 4:00pm

The Perry Fire Department is hosting its first Spring Fest April 29 and 30 at the Perry Village Park, Lake Street.

On Saturday, a craft and vendor show will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; a chicken barbecue is scheduled from noon until sold out – tickets are on sale now; a 5K run/walk is scheduled for a 9 a.m. start with registration at 8 a.m.; and at noon, check out the fire truck pull.

Monday, April 17, 2017 at 12:37 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Attica, history, GCC.

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GCC Associate Professor of History and History Club Advisor Derek Maxfield presents a $250 check dotated by the History Club to Attica Historical Society President Dean June.

Press release, photo submitted:

In response to the recent flood at the Attica Historical Society Museum, the Genesee Community College (GCC) History Club is sponsoring a fundraiser from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 6 called Historians for Attica Historical Society. The event will feature five one-hour history programs and will take place on the lawn of the Attica Historical Society, Main Street, Attica. Guests may purchase tickets to individual programs for $5 each or purchase an all-day pass for $20. Young people under 14 years old get into all programs free. All proceeds benefit the Attica Historical Society and Museum.

Back in February, Dean June, the president of the society, looked down toward the basement door when he was entering the museum and noticed a lot of water coming from under the door. He pushed it open to find more than two feet of water standing in the basement. He does not know exactly how long it had been like that. The sump pump and other safety mechanisms had failed.

As a result, boxes of artifacts including many books were under water. Mold had already set in on the walls and boxes. The society had to discard many artifacts and books that were irreplaceable. Moreover, they had to spend almost $10,000 to clean up, cut out and replace walls, and to seal the basement.

The daylong event will feature:

    • 9 to 10 a.m. -- "History and Politics in 140 Characters or Less: Considering Andrew Jackson in the Age of Trump.” Speaker, Danny Hamner, Adjunct Instructor of History, GCC;

    • 10:15 to 11:15 a.m. -- "Upstate New York State Suffragists and Radical Reform.” Speaker, Melinda Grube, Ph.D, Adjunct Instructor of History, Cayuga Community College.

    • 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. -- Panel discussion: "Living Living History: Becoming Someone Else.” Moderated by Derek Maxfield, associate professor of History, GCC. Panel includes: Melinda Grube, who portrays Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Tom Schobert, who portrays Gen. Robert E. Lee, and Al Parker, great-grandnephew and portrayer of Eli Parker, aide-de-camp of Gen. Ulysses S. Grant;

    • 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. -- Lunch;

    • 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. -- 19th century stories and music by David Armitage and Dona LaValle;

    • 2:45 to 3:45 p.m. -- Civil War Demo/Lecture;

The sounds system for the event is being provided courtesy of Kirk McWhorter of Penny Whiskey.

Pre-sale tickets will be available from the historical society and available at the door on the day of the event. To purchase tickets or for more information call (585) 591-2161.For more information about the individual programs, contact Derek Maxfield at ddmaxfield@genesee.edu

Parking is available behind the Stevens Memorial Library, at the historical society, or in the Presbyterian Church parking lot across the street.

Friday, April 14, 2017 at 11:56 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, news, Warsaw, crime.

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It’s been nearly five decades since the 1969 fiery crash on Route 20A – or as the road is known among the locals “the East Hill” –  that claimed one life and prompted the ban on tractor-trailers from traveling that route. Today, a large red sign over the westbound lane directs “trucks, buses and cars with trailers” to exit Route 20A a quarter-mile up the road, giving truck drivers an alternate route to Warsaw. 

Just last week, two truck drivers were charged, after driving down “the East Hill.”

Rowdy D. Schmidt, 47, of Portland, Tenn., was stopped on East Buffalo Street following an investigation on a hit and run that “took out” roadsigns on the East Hill. He was charged April 5 with logbook violation, operator leaving the scene of a property damage accident, failure to obey traffic device, and operator without a certificate of registration.

Harbans Singh Bedi, 36, of Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada, was stopped on West Buffalo Street April 8 and charged with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the third degree, logbook violation, failure to obey traffic device, and vehicle size violation. He was put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $1,000 cash bail or $2,000 bond.

Both men are due in court May 22.

Warsaw hasn’t seen a fire in the Village like the one on that September evening since 1969. Prior to that day, “the East Hill” was never limited to truck traffic – although it had been known as “dead man’s curve,” and “fruit salad.” Warsaw firefighters coined the road name “fruit salad” after one truck dumped its load of watermelon on “the West Hill” (Route 20A on the west side of Main Street), and another truck dumped its load of bananas on “the East Hill.” After which, Beanie says, the department ate bananas for weeks.

Today, there is a nine-ton weight limit on Route 20A west – based on the history of that section of road.

According to long-time Warsaw Fire Department member, past Warsaw Chief, and past President of the WNY Firemen’s Association, Francis “Beanie” Head, it was “one hell of a fire, I tell you that!”

“The only reason we only lost one life is because it was evening supper hour and all the families were home ready to eat – they were able to get out the back door of their houses… all four of those houses. Unfortunately for them they lost everything they had.”

Head, or Beanie as he is known, had just come home from work and was about ready to have supper with his family. His oldest daughter was celebrating her birthday and his family just sat down to eat.

“I hadn’t even taken a bite yet when I heard a big boom,” Beanie said. “I turned to my wife and said ‘I don’t like that. I’m headed for the car.’ My pager went off just as I was getting in the car, and what they had told me was there were four houses fully involved and a gas tanker was overturned and on fire on East Buffalo Street.”

Beanie says he wasted no time and sped off to the fire hall, driving through flames before he reached and parked the car at the station.

“After the fire, I caught hell for that from my wife, as it was a new car.”

According to reports at that time, the driver of the tractor-trailer had said he lost his brakes coming down the hill and lost control of the vehicle. He was able to escape the cab of the semi before it crashed – spilling 8,000 gallons of gas onto the road – and burst into flames. However, on its way down the hill and into the curve, the tractor-trailer hit a vehicle, subsequently killing the driver of the station wagon.

“We later found out he was a salesman working in this area.”

Beanie and fellow firefighter Bruce Brown were first to arrive at the department and on the scene with a pumper truck. However, the fire was so intense they were only able to get it as far as Short Street because of the flames.

Although firefighters started to arrive on the scene, Beanie was the only chief – second assistant chief – so the title of Chief in Charge fell on his shoulders.

“I had placed a call saying ‘This is Warsaw 5.0. I want a full turnout of all departments to Warsaw. I have four houses fully involved and a tanker still burning.’ I had no more hung up the mic when Wyoming 5.0 (Joe Lee at the time) called in and said they were ‘at the monument, where do you want us?’ They hadn’t waited for a tone-out. They just showed up.”

The Chief in Charge had directed Wyoming to the back of the houses for a water screen. (A water screen is an almost fan-like spray of water from a specialized nozzle. It's typically used to wet down an area that is not involved in the fire to keep it from burning.) When Gainesville Fire Department showed up, he sent them up Livingston Street to protect those houses.

“There was nothing we could do with the burning houses as they were fully consumed. We were just going to wet them down to protect the other houses.”

Every department in the county showed up, the Warsaw Village Police, Wyoming County Sheriff’s Department, New York State Troopers out of Warsaw, and from Genesee County, Geneseo Ambulance and Le Roy Fire Department. There were a total of 22 departments and approximately 300 men and women working the scene.

“We were working the best we could to keep everything else nearby from burning and the next thing I know, there’s a deputy at the stoplight …so nothing moved up our street. Come to find out afterwards, he was an Attica fireman and had his pager on his uniform, too. The Geneseo Ambulance came on the scene and told us they had just dropped a patient off at the hospital and asked if I’d like them to stand by on the scene to cover any squad calls. I have to say, in this county, it doesn’t matter whose fire it is, when help is needed, everybody comes.”

There was so much more power behind the fire because the gas from the tanker acted as an accelerant, fire officials say. The fire was so intensely hot, firemen tried to take cover behind roadsigns to keep some of the heat off them. 

Then, crews heard another explosion, but this time it was on Main Street – from a manhole.

“This told me what was happening. We had gas in the storm drains. It got into the drain inlets on Buffalo Street that run into Main Street, which eventually leads to the disposal plant (Department of Public Works on Linwood Avenue).”

When the truck overturned and slid down the roadway it not only caused sparks to fly, the tanker was split open, dumping the gas along the way. Subsequently, the fuel made its way into the storm drains – which were also tied into residential basement drains – and simply followed the path of least resistance, straight to the wastewater treatment plant on Linwood – two miles away.

“We knew it made its way to the disposal plant because we got a call saying there was gas burning down there. The fire also blew three manhole covers on Main Street so we had shut it down.”

Some of the old photos show the gas running down the street, Beanie says.

A call had been placed to one of the chemical plants in Buffalo for a gas neutralizing agent. The caller had been told they were loading 55-gallon drums onto a truck as they spoke.

“When the driver pulled into the fire hall, his hands were just shaking as he asked me where I wanted the chemical. I told him we were going to go up toward the fire and drop some in the inlets from there. The driver asked if he could take a break – and my wife was part of the Auxiliary and was getting food made for the guys, next thing she’s doing is coming out with a big cup of coffee for him. I think he spilled as much as he drank.

"So I said ‘man what did you do?’ He said ‘there were two state police cars in front of me and two behind me and I never stopped from the time I left that plant. This is a brand-new truck, I had that thing rolling about 80 (mph).’ "

Beanie “got guys together” and they began the arduous task of getting the 55-gallon drums to the storm drains and began dropping the chemical down the drain, so to speak. 

“It was damn scary. When we got all done, we stored the remaining drums in the fire hall.”

While several fire departments worked the scene between the train trestle and the Warsaw Fire Hall, Perry Center and Perry fire departments were just east of the trestle “hosing on that end” so the fire wouldn’t “walk up” the hill. There had also been a report of a fire on Oatka Creek on Main Street, to which Silver Springs Fire Department responded.

Firefighters were on the scene for more than 72 hours battling the blaze. The fire destroyed four homes but didn’t touch the others nearby due to the actions of firefighters watering down the other houses. Firemen also wetted the roofs of the burning homes to keep any sparks or flying tinder from reaching the other houses.

“The fire was burning all night. There was no sense in putting it completely out because it would have cost the homeowners a fortune to get everything cleaned up, so we were trying to help minimize the cost for the residents. At that point, there wasn’t anything salvageable…there was no way to rebuild anything that would may have still stood.”

Because the fire got into the brick and the cinder blocks of the homes, it had degraded them for continued use, thereby rendering them useless.

“My boss came by and even asked what they could do,” said Beanie, who worked for the State Highway Department. “I asked if he could have an operator with a grade-all in the morning to pull up to the basements and stir the stuff around so we could wet any hotspots.

“This whole town was very receptive to the work we had done. We had the respect of every citizen from this town. We had a stack of 'thank yous' from the members of the community. It was a mutual working of organizations that saved the village, really.” 

While crews were walking around checking all the houses and everybody on the street, Beanie says it was like attending a funeral, people were scared, yet they were glad it was over. There was a deep sense of sorrow for the four families who lost their homes…who lost everything, and for the salesman who died.

But as Beanie said, “It was a time when everyone came together as a community. It was a helluva three-day deal…I tell you that.”

At 86 years old, Beanie is still as active as he can be in the Warsaw Fire Department. As current Fire Chief Joe Cummins says, “He’s 4-foot-nothin’ in stature, but 10-foot-somethin’ in personality.”

“I enjoy this,” Beanie said. “If something serious happens, I mourn with them and I try to be there to back them up….and I always will be, as long as I can walk.”

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Wednesday, April 12, 2017 at 4:08 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Warsaw, fire safety.

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Warsaw Central School District students can show off their artistic talent and vie for a chance for their artwork to be included in the Warsaw Fire Department’s 2018 calendar.

The fire department is hosting a drawing contest for students in kindergarten through 12th grade as part of its seventh annual Recruitment and Safety Expo from noon to 5 p.m. April 29.

The drawing contest is open to all students with entries submitted to the student’s art teacher by April 21 and will be on display April 29 from noon to 5 p.m. at the Warsaw fire hall, 40 E. Buffalo St. (Route 20A). 

A winner will be selected from each grade level by community participation at the Recruitment and Safety Expo event. All winners selected will also be included in the 2018 Fire Safety Calendar. Proceeds from the sale of the calendars support the fire department. Additionally, winners will win a ride to school in a fire truck.

Drawing topics may include, but are not limited to:

    • Electrical Safety

    • Fireworks Safety

    • Gasoline Safety

    • Smoke Alarms

    • Grilling Safety

    • Halloween Safety

    • Carbon Monoxide Safety

    • Stop, Drop, and Roll

    • Home Escape Plans

    • Burn Awareness

    • Matches and Lighters

    • Summer Safety

    • Winter Holiday Safety

    • Candle Fire Safety

    • Fireplace Safety

    • Cooking Fire Safety

And the rules are?

    • All entries must be made and submitted in landscape format for judging;

    • All submissions are to include an entry form taped to the back of the drawing which includes the student's name, grade, and contact information (entry forms can be found at the school);

    • No names are to be included on the front of any drawings; and 

    • All drawings must be made on 8.5- by 11-inch paper.

The Saturday afternoon Expo features hot dogs and refreshments, the NYS Safe ID Program for all ages, fire truck and aerial ladder truck rides, equipment demonstrations, and more. Patrons will not only meet local firefighters, but also Smokey the Bear from 1 to 3 p.m..

The schedule of events includes: 

    • All-event-long -- Blood Pressure and Glucose Readings

    • 1 to 3:30 p.m. -- Jaws of Life Extrication Demonstration

    • 12:30 and 4:15 p.m. -- Grease Fire Prevention Demonstration

    • 2:45 p.m. -- State Police K-9 Unit Demonstration

    • 12:45 and 3:15 p.m. -- State Police Rollover Car Simulator

    • 1:45 p.m. -- Firefighter Competition Drills

    • 12:15 and 4 p.m. -- Fire Extinguisher Demonstration

    • 2:15 p.m. -- History of your local Fire Department

In addition to the April 29 event, the fire department is also holding two open recruitment nights – from 7 to 9 tonight, and from 5 to 7 p.m. April 18. 

For more information about the Recruitment and Safety Expo, call the Warsaw Fire Department at (585) 786-2468.

Tuesday, April 11, 2017 at 12:44 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Warsaw, Attica, Perry.

The National Prescription Pill Take Back Day aims to provide a safe, convenient and responsible means of disposing of prescription drugs. The Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office and the Attica and Perry police departments have partnered with the Drug Enforcement Agency in providing this service to county residents. 

Unused or expired medication, both prescription and over-the-counter drugs, can be disposed of with no questions asked at three Wyoming County Locations from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 29:

    • Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office, 151 N. Main St., Warsaw; (585) 786-8989;

    • Perry Police Department, 46 N. Main St., Perry (585) 237-5233; and 

    • Attica Police Department, 43 Exchange St., Attica; (585) 591-0881.

According to the Food and Drug Administration, while medications can be thrown in the household trash, community-based drug “take back” programs offer the best option. There are a small number of medicines that may be especially harmful if taken by someone other than the person for whom the prescription was written. Additionally, many of these drugs have specific disposal instructions. Some of these medications can be flushed down the sink or toilet. For a list of medications recommended for disposal by flushing click here

The FDA recommends following these guidelines when throwing out old or unused medication:

    • Follow any specific disposal instructions on the label or packaging;

    • Take advantage of programs that allow the public to take unused drugs to a central location for disposal; or

    • Transfer unused medicines to collectors registered with the DEA. Visit the DEA’s website or call 1-800-882-9539 for more information and to find an authorized collector in your community.

If no disposal instructions are given, the FDA recommends:

    • Remove them from their original containers and mix them with used coffee grounds, dirt or kitty litter; and

    • Place the mixture in a sealable bag or empty can to prevent the drug from leaking out of a garbage bag.

Other tips include:

    • Removing all identifying information on prescription labels;

    • Do not give medications to friends; and 

    • When in doubt about proper disposal, ask your pharmacist.

Additionally, two collection drug boxes are located in the lobby of the Sheriff’s Department that are available to the public 24-hours-a-day, 365 days a year.

For more information on drug disposal visit the Food and Drug Administration Web site

For more information on safe drug disposal visit the Environmental Protection Agency Web site.

Monday, April 10, 2017 at 10:21 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, arts, Warsaw, dance.

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Saturday evening celebrated the diversity of dance with Dance Diversions, at Warsaw High School, Warsaw, with performances of classical ballet, contemporary dance, jazz, and hip-hop/b-boy styles. The mixed repertory dance concert was directed by Sarah Keeler-Badger and presented by the Arts Council for Wyoming County with the sponsorship of Tompkins Bank of Castile and the Wyoming Foundation. 

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