Wyoming County

Friday, September 29, 2017 at 12:11 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Perry, Arcade, Java.

Two county men charged with sex crimes were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun Sept. 28.

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       Clifford Murch

Clifford Murch, 21, of Perry, was sentenced to two years in prison, five years post-release supervision, and fees and surcharges on the conviction of rape in the second degree, a Class D felony.

Mark Owens, 50, of Arcade, pled guilty to criminal sexual act in the third degree, a Class E felony.

Murch was charged Dec. 8 with rape in the second degree and endangering the welfare of a child under 17 years old.

In August 2016 Murch was 20 years old and on parole for an unrelated crime when he raped the child. At the time of his arrest, he was put in Wyoming County Jail on $20,000 cash bail.

In February he pled not guilty to the crime and bail was set again at $20,000 cash. An order of protection was also issued.

During his Aug. 30 court appearance, he pled guilty to the rape charge.

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       Mark Owens

Owens was charged April 20 with sexual abuse in the third degree following an investigation of an incident that happened in the Town of Java.

During his recent court appearance, he waived indictment on the abuse charge, as well as criminal sexual act in the third degree, a Class E felony, and sexual abuse in the third degree, a Class B felony.

Orders of protection were issued against both men.

Owens is scheduled for sentencing Dec. 7.

Friday, September 29, 2017 at 11:08 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Attica, Arcade, Warsaw.

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun Sept. 28.

Richard Mason, who is accused of a crime in Arcade, pled not guilty to strangulation in the second degree, a Class D felony, and assault in the third degree, a Class A misdemeanor. Motions are scheduled Nov. 2. Orders of protection were also issued.

Melissa Baker, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to six months in jail and five years probation on the conviction of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fourth degree, a Class C felony. Restitution of $80 has been paid. She is also responsible for a $50 DNA fee.

Daren Tingue, who committed a crime in Arcade, pled guilty to criminal possession of precursors of methamphetamine, a Class E felony, and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree, a Class A misdemeanor. The case has been adjourned to Dec. 7.

The following, who is an inmate at a State Correctional Facility, was in Court Sept. 27.

Bail is set for state inmate cases for two reasons:

    • In the event that the inmate’s current sentence is overturned on appeal or the inmate’s sentence is about to expire the bail will kick in on the new case and the inmate would be turned over to the Wyoming County jail while the new case is pending; and

    • When bail is placed on an inmate it follows the inmate so when they are moved to different facilities it is one way for them to be found and also the state system knows there is another case still pending.

Hassan Brown pled not guilty to promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony. Motions are scheduled Dec. 20. Bail was set at $5,000.

Wednesday, September 27, 2017 at 5:47 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Castile.

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File photo.

On July 11 the Castile woman who was accused of setting fire to the Castile Diner in February pled guilty to criminal mischief in Wyoming County Court.

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   Amy S. Goodenow

On Sept. 21 Amy S. Goodenow, no age provided, was sentenced to three to six years in prison on the conviction of criminal mischief in the second degree, a Class D felony, as a second felony offender.

Additionally, she is required to pay $200,000 in restitution and Judge Michael Mohun referred her to Willard parole supervision.

Willard is a Drug Treatment Campus (DTC) operated by the NYS Department of Correctional Services and Community Supervision (DOCCS) in collaboration with OASAS (Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services). It was created in 1995 as a new sentencing option for low-level drug offenders and parole violators who previously would have been sent to a traditional prison. The Willard program was created as an intermediate sanction — “with teeth” — to deal with the problem of relapse.

The conditions of her sentence were such that she waived her right to appeal and admit that she is a second felony offender.

The status is from a 2010 driving while intoxicated conviction under Leandra’s Law. The law makes it a felony to drive drunk with a child passenger in the car. She was the first in Wyoming County to be convicted of that crime.

During the early morning hours of Feb. 15 a fire broke out at the Castile Diner, 125 S. Main St., Castile. Following an investigation, it was determined that the fire was intentionally set and Goodenow was the suspect.

At the time of the fire, she was the owner of the business but not the owner of the contents, building or property.

Members from Castile, Silver Springs, Gainesville, Bliss, Pike, and Nunda fire departments were on the scene for close to five hours putting out the flames. 

Assisting at the scene included Wyoming County Emergency Services, the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Department, the New York State Police, and the Village of Castile. Standing by at empty fire stations included Perry, Warsaw and Fillmore fire departments.

Wednesday, September 27, 2017 at 4:10 pm
posted by Billie Owens in Attica, Wyoming County, charity, Gateway Home, Sports, volleyball.

Gateway Home of Attica is the beneficiary of this year's charity fundraising volleyball game scheduled Oct. 5th at the Alexander Central School Gymnasium.

The Lady Blue Devils of Attica will face Alexander's Lady Trojans with the junior varsity game at 5 p.m., followed by varsity play at 6:30.

Event co-chairs Colette Yax and Laura Marzolf invite the community to come support this worthy cause.

Gateway Home is gearing up for a 2018 opening of its historic location at 91 Main St., Attica, as a comfort care home for individuals who are at the final stages of their lives.

Gateway volunteer Jeff Clark said the home is undergoing renovations including electrical and plumbing work and the structure is going to need a new roof.

“We’ve had extraordinary financial and volunteer support,” Clark said. “Community involvement and community support is the key to our success."

Marzolf said: “We are rallying Alexander, Attica and surrounding communities to help us make this our most successful benefit to date. All of Gateway Home’s funding is through donations and fundraisers. We have a friendly rivalry between Alexander and Attica schools and we are hoping this pays off for Gateway Home."

The fundraiser includes a basket auction, bake sale and a serving contest with a chance to win prizes from local merchants. Alexander Central School is located at 3314 Buffalo St. in Alexander.

Community members wishing to donate to the event may contact Colette Yax at 716-400-3628 or Laura Marzolf at 585-322-3748.

Wednesday, September 27, 2017 at 2:59 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Attica, Warsaw.

An Attica man who pled guilty to attempted strangulation of another person was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison.

During the early morning hours of July 30, Attica PD responded to a violent domestic incident on Prospect Street in the Village. At the time of his arrest Adam M. Jellison, 39, was charged with two counts of aggravated harassment, two counts of assault in the third degree, criminal mischief in the fourth degree, unlawful imprisonment in the second degree, and strangulation in the second degree.

On Aug. 31 Jellison pled guilty to attempted strangulation in the second degree, a Class E felony.

During sentencing an order of protection was also issued against Jellison and he is responsible for all fees and surcharges incurred.

Wednesday, September 27, 2017 at 9:40 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Attica.

Three prison inmates were arrested Sept. 20 on charges of promoting prison contraband.

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  Carlos Corrales

Carlos Corrales, 32, currently housed in Attica Correctional Facility was charged with promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony.

He is accused of possessing drug contraband within Attica on March 1.

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   Ryan Boodhoo    Calvin Benjamin

Ryan Boodhoo, 22, and Calvin Benjamin, 31, were each charged with promoting prison contraband in the first degree and criminal possession of a weapon in the third degree, both are Class D felonies.

Boodhoo, currently housed at Southport Correctional Facility, Pine City, is accused of possessing an edged ceramic weapon July 7.

Benjamin, currently housed at Shawangunk Correctional Facility, Wallkill, is accused of possessing an edged plastic weapon on April 7.

Both men were inmates at Wyoming Correctional Facility in Attica when the crimes allegedly occurred.

All three inmates were arraigned in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael M. Mohun and then returned to the custody of the New York State Department of Community and Correctional Services.

They are due in Wyoming County Court at a later date.

Tuesday, September 26, 2017 at 4:31 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, Business, Warsaw, agriculture, agribusiness.

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Her excitement about her newest venture was evident in her voice and the light in her eyes.

“On Columbus Day weekend (Oct. 7) we are going to have a 'sha-bang',” said Burley Berries and Blooms owner Megan Burley. “We are going to have pumpkins, flowers, kid activities, apple dumplings, and we hope to sell East Hill (Creamery) cheeses as well and hope to have melted cheese on potatoes.”

Late last month, Burley officially opened the “Blooms” portion of her business at 6335 Route 20A, Warsaw, with a ribbon cutting and plans on expanding both berry and flower varieties next season.

“Growing up on a farm in Pennsylvania I learned so much…and it's a good way to raise children. And it gave me the people interaction. So it's helped in this venture.”

Burley moved to Wyoming County five years ago following her marriage to Ryan Burley. Four years ago they planted strawberries. This summer she expanded her U-pick offerings to include U-pick flowers.

Although this is Burley’s first year experimenting with the flowers, this season was the third for her berry patches.

“I added the flowers because I love flowers and the garden in front was filled with flowers. I liked them growing up, so I decided to do my own. I didn’t want to go into debt to build the business so I am starting out small.”

However, Burley didn’t start out with an entrepreneurial career plan, after graduating from Penn State with a degree in Agricultural Science, she planned on doing crop consulting. Instead, she married Ryan and moved to New York.

“We met on Farmersonly.com and I presented the idea of my own business pretty early on in the relationship. I also work for Cornell Cooperative Extension and work with beginning farmers, so it’s helped me in what I’m doing as well.”

Although Megan grew up on a farm, she didn’t know much about cows until she met Ryan. Ryan continues to work his family farm – East Hill Farms – in Warsaw. Her family’s farm was focused on vegetable crops.

“Even in high school I grew strawberries. When we first moved here we put in a half acre of strawberries and added a half acre every year since. We are almost up to two acres of strawberries.”

Although planting the berry can begin as early as March, the picking season has a much shorter window – three to four weeks – and it takes two years for the plants to produce fruit. In order to extend the picking season as long as possible, Burley planted a variety of strawberry called Malwina. She hopes this will give her an extra two weeks of picking season.

“We’ve planted 15 varieties and next year we will have eight pickable varieties. We have Early Glow, which are the first strawberries of the season and are very sweet, and Jewel and Honeoye…they are all sweet varieties.”

To make the best use of the land, Burley plans on rotating the crops every few years. She intends on keeping a planting of strawberries for three to four years. By that fourth year, the yield is less. Subsequently, the patch of land Burley used for her initial crop of strawberries will now become a blueberry patch, she says.

In addition to her part-time employment with CCE and Berries and Blooms, Megan and Ryan have two toddlers – Judson, 2 years old, and Leena, 1.

“They are 11 months apart so it was a big surprise when we knew we were having them so close together… Strawberry season is more overwhelming than the flowers…there is more effort with the strawberries.”

However, she said she couldn’t do it without the help of her husband and augmenting child care with daycare.

“Half if not more of the people who come here are moms and they bring their kids. I’m a mom so I understand the juggling act, so I encourage them to bring the kids. I’m more in this for the people than growing the crop. However, I do hope to make this a full-time venture.”

In addition to the Warsaw location, goods from Burley Berries and Blooms can be found at the Geneseo Farmers Market from 3 to 6:30 p.m. Thursdays through Oct. 19, and in a possible new craft beer from the Silver Lake Brewing Project.

“They bought strawberries, blueberries and currants. The idea is to give the ale an aroma.”

Burley Berries is still offering U-pick flowers this year and are sold on a self-serve, U-pick basis. Flowers can also be bought at bulk pricing for weddings or events.

For more information about Burley Berries and Blooms call (585) 687-7050 or click here.

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Tuesday, September 26, 2017 at 2:28 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Warsaw, Perry.

More than 1,000 purple flags will be placed in Warsaw and Perry between Sept. 29 and Oct. 2 in the hope of casting a bright light on an often hidden issue.

RESTORE Sexual Assault Services, in partnership with the Wyoming County District Attorney’s Office, Department of Social Services, and the Village of Perry, will kick off its fourth annual Domestic Violence Awareness Month campaign Friday at 9 a.m. at the Government Center, Main Street, Warsaw.

A second display will be placed at 9 a.m. Oct. 2 at the Department of Social Services, 466 N. Main St., Warsaw.  At 1 p.m., flags will be placed at the intersection of Center, Covington, and Grove streets in Perry.

An average of one in four people — regardless of gender — will experience dating or domestic violence in their life. According to an October 2016 report from the New York State Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence, in 2015:

    • there were 63 intimate partner homicides in the state – the fewest since 2007;

    • a total of 11,942 strangulation offenses were charged at arrest or arraignment – a statewide decrease of 1.5 percent;

    • probation departments reported a significant increase in the number of Family Court cases handled statewide – 76 in 2014 to 92 in 2015; and

    • firearms were used in 37 percent of intimate partner homicides – a significant increase when compared to 29 percent in 2014 and 33 percent in 2013.

Most people recognize physical or sexual violence toward a partner as abuse, yet many other controlling behaviors are excused or romanticized, RESTORE officials say. Any behavior meant to exert power and control over a partner can be seen as abuse — whether or not that behavior includes physical violence.

The purple flags will be representative of the 1,050 Wyoming County residents – 25 percent of the population – that could be impacted by interpersonal violence. They will remain on display throughout the month.

While the month of October is dedicated to raising awareness about domestic violence, RESTORE works year-round to deliver services to survivors and their loved ones in Wyoming County. These services would not be possible without the dedication and commitment of passionate volunteer advocates.

To learn more about how you can assist survivors of domestic violence, email lauren.berger@ppcwny.org.

RESTORE leads the community response to sexual violence through advocacy and education, by providing the safety, support and validation that changes the lives of all those affected.

RESTORE 24-hour hotlines:

    • 1-800- 527-1757 – Wyoming, Livingston, Orleans and Genesee counties.

    • (585) 546- 2777 – Monroe County.

Planned Parenthood of Central and Western New York protects and provides health care and education that empowers individuals and families.

 

Tuesday, September 26, 2017 at 1:17 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Perry, music.

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Information sourced from a press release, photo submitted

Celebrate fall, carve a pumpkin and enjoy the music of Allen Hopkins from 10 a.m. to noon at Perry’s final Summer Saturdays Arts Series of the season at the Farmers’ Market.

The market, located on the Perry Festival Plaza on Main Street, is open from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sept. 30. This free performance is part of the Summer Saturdays Arts Series, held on the Perry Festival Plaza in downtown Perry.

Hopkins’ musical selections range from American traditional to contemporary, with some Celtic reels, a bit of Klezmer music, and some bluegrass thrown in for good measure. His music is known throughout Western New York and has performed at the New England Folk Festival, the Pinewoods Folk Music Club in New York City. Additionally, he teaches workshops at Hochstein School of Music & Dance in Rochester.

At 10:30 a.m. get in the spirit of the season by carving a pumpkin. Purchase a pumpkin and the market will supply the markers, patterns and safety knives needed to make a vegetable masterpiece.

The Summer Saturdays Arts Series was made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; administered in Wyoming County by the Arts Council for Wyoming County. We are also thankful to Friends of the Summer Saturdays Arts Series and for the generous donation of time from Arts Series demonstrators.

Monday, September 25, 2017 at 6:52 pm

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Information sourced from a press release, file photos:

Wyoming County is commonly known as a leader in the agricultural industry, but it is not well known that manufacturing is one of the county’s top business sectors. The county is home to approximately 50 unique manufacturers making products that range from automatic girth welders used on oil storage tanks around the world, products used in the automotive industry, to baked goods stocked on Jet Blue airplanes.

On Oct. 5 Wyoming County will celebrate Manufacturing Day – a nationwide grassroots movement dedicated to overcoming the shared challenges facing manufacturers today. Officials say it’s a way to recognize and highlight the contributions manufacturing makes to the economy of the county.

Manufacturing has experienced unprecedented growth in Wyoming County in metals-based manufacturing jobs since 2010, Wyoming County Chamber & Tourism President Scott Gardner says. This increase is due to the workforce, low energy and operational costs, and easy access to 50 percent of North America’s population. According to DataUSA, manufacturing jobs represent 13.5 percent of the workforce in Wyoming County. Our manufacturers employ more than 2,500 workers, 40 percent above the national average, and those workers on average earn $56,516 per year.

However, one of the most pressing issues facing manufacturers today is finding skilled labor. The gap between job requirements and applicant’s skill set is leaving 600,000 manufacturing jobs unfilled in the United States.

Manufacturers' ability to address this gap has been hindered by the public perception that careers in manufacturing are undesirable and by insufficient preparatory education. Both of these problems stem from a lack of understanding of present-day manufacturing environments, which are highly technical, officials say.

Manufacturing today includes highly trained, well-paid employees who work on state-of-the-art equipment, although the perception persists that they are often viewed as antiquated factories designed for low-skilled workers. This change in public perception is the first step in addressing one of the main challenges faced by manufacturers today – a gap in skilled labor.

“We are very pleased and fortunate to have a solid manufacturing base right here in the county,” Gardner said. “We recognize the economic contributions these companies are making every day, and their commitment to the workforce of Wyoming County. We also recognize that these companies also need a skilled labor force and environment that is friendly to business.”

One of the main reasons motivating Manufacturing Day is to introduce students to the potential of manufacturing careers. The event is a chance to spark student interest in manufacturing that could lead to further studies, a new generation of skilled workers, and an eventual closing of the skills gap. Giving students early exposure to manufacturing careers is critically important to ensuring a long-term talent pipeline.

“It’s a constant pleasure to visit and work with many of our manufacturers and it’s always a treat for me to see firsthand the products that are made here and witness the pride the workforce takes in their work and the satisfaction they realize knowing their quality products are being sold throughout the world,” said Wyoming County Industrial Development Agency Executive Director James Pierce.

“The general public drives by these businesses every day but does not have a notion of what amazing things are going on behind the walls. That is why Manufacturing Day was created, to raise the awareness and importance of manufacturing.”

More than 64 percent of students in career and technical education (CTE) programs say that their own interests and personal experiences are the greatest influence on their future career decisions.

A recent Public Policy Institute survey reported New York employers say, STEM positions (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) are the most difficult to fill. Additionally, the projection is that these workforce shortages will persist over the coming decade. Skilled production is the category in which they anticipate the most severe ongoing shortage.

STEM positions comprise four of the top five categories of positions that New York employers are finding most difficult to fill.

The national average age of a skilled worker in manufacturing is 56, according to a Manufacturing Institute report. The study also projects a shortage of two million workers between 2015 and 2025.

Employers responding to the Public Policy Institute survey also predict severe shortages in engineering and information technology occupations. They anticipate a more moderate shortage in mathematics-intensive occupations. These are the same top four workforce categories employers reported the highest difficulty filling jobs currently. However, they are more optimistic about occupations such as social science and architecture.

To bring more awareness to the issue this year, in cooperation with the Wyoming County Industrial Development Agency and Business Education Council, the Wyoming County Chamber is inviting area students in ninth and 10th grades to visit three local manufacturing businesses, Morton Salt in Silver Springs, Advanced Rubber Products in Wyoming, and the Marquart Company in Gainesville.

“We are excited to show our students the exciting opportunities that a career in manufacturing can provide them as they are making their future career choices,” said Wyoming County Business Education Council Executive Director Linda Leblond. “We want to keep our talented youth right here in Wyoming County. Each business is unique in the types of jobs and manufacturing processes that take place and will offer students an up-close look at potential job opportunities.”

To learn more about Manufacturing Day, visit www.mfgday.com. For additional information on manufacturing in Wyoming County, call the Chamber at (585) 786-0307 or the IDA at (585) 786-3764.

Monday, September 25, 2017 at 5:46 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Perry.

Eric R. Entenberg, 26, Rochester, was arrested Sept. 22 following a property damage accident on Myers Road in the Town of Perry, Aug. 25.

Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say Entenberg was determined to have been intoxicated when he had driven his vehicle into a ditch near the intersection of Myers and Simmons roads. Additionally, he allegedly had a revoked New York State identification card from multiple prior DWI convictions.

Monroe County Sheriff’s deputies apprehended the man in Rochester and turned him over to the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office.

He was charged with: aggravated driving while intoxicated with a BAC of .18 percent or higher; DWI; and DWI with a BAC .08 percent or higher, all as Class D felonies; and aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the first degree, a Class E felony; violation of an Ignition Interlock Device restriction, a Class A misdemeanor; aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the third degree, an unclassified misdemeanor; and unlicensed operator; uninspected motor vehicle; failure to keep right; moving from lane unsafely; and failure to notify the Department of Motor Vehicles of a change of address.

Entenberg was arraigned in the Town of Perry Court, where he was put in Wyoming County Jail without bail.

He is due in Wyoming County Court at a later date.

Monday, September 25, 2017 at 5:40 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Warsaw, Perry.

Anthony D. Osbourn, 25, of Buffalo, was charged Sept. 24 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the second degree. Osbourn was arrested after being found roadside in a vehicle on Route 20A, Perry. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say Osbourn had been driving from Dansville to Buffalo when he had pulled over near the intersection at Beardsley Road. Additionally, he is accused of having a revoked New York State driver’s license from a previous DWI – alcohol conviction. He was arraigned in the Town of Warsaw Court and put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $500 cash bail or $2,000 bond. He is due in the Town of Perry Court Oct. 4.​

Travis J. Jett, 25, Warsaw, was charged Sept. 19 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the third degree and littering. He is due in Avon Town Court on a later date.

Jeannine R. Reese, 45, Lawrenceville, Pa., was charged Sept. 23 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the third degree, failure to notify the Department of Motor Vehicles of change of address, and speed over 55 mph. Reese was arrested following a traffic stop on Route 20A, Perry. She is accused of traveling 73 in a 55-mph zone. During the stop, it was allegedly found she had a suspended New York State driving privilege. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say she failed to pay the New York State Department of Motor Vehicle a driver responsibility assessment for previous traffic infraction convictions in the state. Her vehicle was towed from the scene and she is due in the Town of Perry Court Oct. 18.

Monday, September 25, 2017 at 5:04 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Arcade.

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File photo

Wyoming County Chamber & Tourism and the Arcade Area Chamber of Commerce are set to once again host Arcade’s Main & More event from 4 to 7:30 p.m. Oct. 5. Beginning and ending at the Arcade Chamber office – 228 Main St. – visitors can meander along Main Street for an evening of visiting merchants and their partnering businesses.

The concept is simple, Main Street businesses partner with off-Main Street businesses, giving visitors the opportunity to learn more about local merchants in the area. Planned activities include music, door prizes, wine tastings, a car seat check, a hurricane relief fundraiser, and more.

At the beginning of their journey, event-goers will receive a map listing participating businesses. With a map in hand, participants are encouraged to visit every location listed where they receive a “check-in” stamp. When the map is completed, revelers are entered to win door prizes donated by the participating merchants.

A $10 “swag bag” is also available, but it must be pre-purchased through the website www.wycochamber.org. Commemorative event glasses will be available for $5 each the night of the event. The event is free and includes refreshments at stops throughout the event.

“This is always a fun event that brings customers to downtown businesses and offers a unique opportunity to learn more about what is available from the local business community. It’s also a great time mingling with friends and neighbors,” said Chamber & Tourism President Scott Gardner.

“By combining the off-Main and Main Street businesses, both the business owners and customers get the opportunity for exposure and networking. This has been a very successful event in past years, and I thank everyone involved for making it another great success.”

For more information on attending call (585) 786-0307 or visit  www.wycochamber.org

Friday, September 22, 2017 at 5:30 pm
posted by Billie Owens in news, announcements, lead, Wyoming County, health.

Press release:

Before you start your fall cleanup consider the age of your home and whether or not you may have a lead hazard.

“Lead poisoning can affect anyone, but is especially harmful to pregnant women, infants and small children who are growing rapidly,” said Paul Pettit, Public Health director for Genesee and Orleans counties.

Lead poisoning can cause miscarriages and stillbirths, high blood pressure (hypertension), nerve disorders, memory and concentration problems and muscle and joint pain and in children it can lower IQ, cause growth problems, kidney damage, behavior problems, anemia and hearing loss.

If lead poisoning is not taken care of, it can also cause permanent damage to various organs in both children and adults. You may or may not experience any signs or symptoms of lead poisoning. State law requires all children be tested at age 1 and again at age 2. Contact your primary care doctor to be tested.

Federal law requires landlords and contractors who are hired for renovations, repair and painting in homes, childcare centers and schools built before 1978 that disturb painted surfaces, to be certified and follow specific practices to prevent lead contamination.

This law is the EPA’s Lead Renovation, Repair and Painting (RPR) Rule. Lead-based paint is especially problematic on surfaces that children can chew on such as windowsills, doors and doorframes, stairs, railings, banisters, porches and fences Lead can also be found in drinking water in homes that have plumbing with lead or lead solder.

“If you suspect that your house has lead hazards, here are some important things you can do to protect your family,” Pettit said.

  • Take advantage of the Free Lead Testing Pilot Program: A $1.5 million state program to test for lead in drinking water is available to New York State residents. Provides residents who are served by either a private well or public water system with an opportunity to have their residential drinking water tested for free. To sign-up visit, https://health.ny.gov/environmental/water/drinking/lead/free_lead_testing_pilot_program.htm.
  • If you rent, call the landlord immediately to report peeling or chipping paint.
  • Damp mop and damp dust often. Clean up paint chips right away and clean all other surfaces with general all-purpose cleaner.
  • Let your cold water run for a minute before using it for making baby formula, drinking, brushing your teeth and cooking to flush lead picked up from pipes. Do NOT use warm tap water to make baby formula.
  • Wash children’s hands and toys often to wash off any lead dust. Keep them way from chipping paint and prevent destructive behaviors like chewing on painted surfaces.
  • Always hire certified contractors for work that will disrupt paint in housing or child occupied buildings before 1978 or get properly trained and certified yourself. For a certified firm check this site: http://cfpub.epa.gov/flpp/searchrrp_firm.htm.

For more information about the Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule (RRP) visit the Environmental Protection Agency web site at www.epa.gov/lead/pubs/renovation.htm or call the National Lead Information Center at 1-800-424-LEAD.

To learn about additional sources of lead visit, https://www.health.ny.gov/environmental/lead/sources.htm.

For information about services that your local health department provides visit:

Friday, September 22, 2017 at 4:59 pm

Press release:

U.S. Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer today announced a total of $1,416,000 in federal funding for the Town of Byron and the Village of Wyoming. The federal funding was allocated through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development program.

Specifically, the Village of Wyoming will receive a $666,000 USDA Water and Waste Disposal Grant to replace an existing water main, update a water storage tank, and install a new well. The new well will provide a second water source for the town, bringing them up to Department of Health regulations. This update will provide water to 163 residents and local businesses, and will protect the village’s drinking water source and supply.

The Town of Byron will receive a $750,000 USDA Water and Waste Disposal Grant to create Water District #8, which will provide water services to 170 additional residents.

“This federal investment is a shot in the arm for Upstate New York’s local economies,” Senator Schumer said. “These federal funds for the Town of Byron and the Village of Wyoming will help boost economic development in the region and support critical water infrastructure.

"I am proud to announce this federal investment and will continue to fight to make sure that rural communities have the tools they need to protect and maintain their infrastructure.”

USDA Rural Development's mission is to increase economic opportunity and improve the quality of life for rural residents. This funding is awarded through the Rural Business Development Grant program, administered by the USDA’s Rural Development agency.

The Rural Development agency is committed to improving economies and lives in rural America, through loans, grants and loan guarantees. They support local businesses, individuals and communities by promoting economic development, offering loans and providing technical assistance.

Friday, September 22, 2017 at 4:00 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Warsaw.
Event Date and Time: 
September 26, 2017 - 9:00am to 2:00pm

On Tuesday, Sept. 26,  Oak Orchard Health will join more than 2,500 partners nationwide in hosting a National Voter Registration Day 2017 event at its centers in Albion, Brockport and Warsaw. They will be part of a massive 50-state effort to register thousands of voters.

The event will be held at the following locations:

    • 81 S. Main St., Warsaw, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.;

    • 301 West Ave., Albion, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and

    • 300 West Ave., Brockport, from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.​

Friday, September 22, 2017 at 3:56 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Warsaw, Attica, Arcade, Castile, Perry.

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun Sept. 20 and are from State Correctional Facilities.

Bail is set for state inmate cases for two reasons:

    • In the event that the inmate’s current sentence is overturned on appeal or the inmate’s sentence is about to expire the bail will kick in on the new case and the inmate would be turned over to the Wyoming County jail while the new case is pending; and

    • When bail is placed on an inmate it follows the inmate so when they are moved to different facilities it is one way for them to be found and also the state system knows there is another case still pending.

Luis Pagan was sentenced to seven years in prison, five years post-release supervision, and surcharges and fees. He was convicted of assault in the second degree, a Class D felony. The sentence is to run concurrently to his current term.

Patrick Hill was sentenced to one-and-one-half years in prison and one year post-release supervision on the conviction of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class D felony. The sentence is to run consecutively with his current sentence.

James Smith had his case adjourned to Oct. 25 for a hearing.

Anthony Placido was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison on the conviction of attempted promoting prison contraband, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. The sentence is to run consecutively to his current term. Placido is also responsible for all surcharges incurred.

Calvin Benjamin pled guilty to attempted promoting prison contraband, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. He was indicted for promoting prison contraband, a Class D felony. Sentencing is scheduled Nov. 8.

Bryant Gibbs was in court for motions. His case was adjourned to Oct. 5 for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Ryan Boodhoo pled not guilty to promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony. Motions are scheduled Nov. 8. Bail was set at $5,000.

Carlos Corrales pled not guilty to promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony. Motions are scheduled Nov. 8. Bail was set at $5,000.

Dominick Coffer was in court for motions. A trial is scheduled Dec. 14.

Benedict Agostini had his case adjourned to Oct. 11 for motions and a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Donald Green was in court for motions. The case has been adjourned to Oct. 11 for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Steven Green was in court for motions. The case has been adjourned to Oct. 11 for an appearance.

Deoz Miller-Harris was in court for motions. The case has been adjourned to Oct. 11 for an appearance.

The following were in court before Mohun Sept. 20 and 21.

Jonathon Bucknam, who is accused of a crime in Perry, was in court for motions. The case has been adjourned to Oct. 4 for a Huntley Hearing. A Huntley Hearing is a pretrial hearing in New York State and is requested for the purpose of reviewing the manner in which the police obtained statements from the defendant.

Aaron Schinsing, who is accused of a crime in Arcade, had his case adjourned to Dec. 21 for pre-plea.

Cory Dahl, who is accused of a crime in Castile, had his case adjourned to today.

Eduardo Bautista-Cruz, who committed a crime in Genesee Falls, waived indictment on burglary in the second degree, a Class C felony, and unlawful imprisonment in the first degree, a Class E felony. He pled guilty to attempted burglary in the second degree, a Class D felony. He was sentenced to a conditional discharge and surcharges. An order of protection was also issued.

Stephen Harder, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced to four years in prison with 10 years post-release supervision, fees and surcharges. He was convicted of attempted course of sexual conduct against a child in the second degree, a Class E felony. An order of protection was also issued.

Friday, September 22, 2017 at 3:19 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, Sen. Gallivan, announcements.

Press release:

On Sept. 12 a bill was signed into law that closes crucial gaps in the communication between and among agencies responsible for the safety of children in foster care.

The bill (S4172), sponsored by Sen. Patrick M. Gallivan (R-C-I, Elma), requires the notification of agencies placing foster children when there are reports of suspected abuse or maltreatment at homes where children have been placed. Officials say this would prevent the unwitting placement of additional children in situations that risk subjecting them to abuse or maltreatment.

“The state has a responsibility to ensure the safety and welfare of all of New York’s children, especially those in foster care,” Gallivan said. “By sharing critical information about suspected abuse or maltreatment, we can better protect these vulnerable children and avoid putting additional youth at risk.”

The measure requires that suspected abuse or maltreatment reports be provided to the responsible agency or social services entity in cases where children are placed in homes outside the jurisdiction of origin. For example, if a child is the responsibility of authorities in Warsaw, and the child is placed with a foster family in Java, then any suspected abuse or maltreatment reports would need to be filed with the responsible agency in Java, too, and vice versa. The intention is to eliminate bureaucratic loopholes and strengthen oversight. 

The State Senate and Assembly passed the legislation earlier this year. Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed the bill into law on Sept. 12.

Friday, September 22, 2017 at 3:13 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, Warsaw.

The Wyoming Foundation recently awarded more than $11,000 to seven Wyoming County nonprofit organizations for its 2017 grand cycle. Grants were awarded to programs with a preference for requests that increase job readiness for youth and connect residents to the County’s arts and cultural gems. 

“The Wyoming Foundation Council is committed to addressing the needs of the county and its residents,” said Wyoming Foundation council chair Scott Gardner. “We are honored to support specific programs that benefit the quality of life for those that call Wyoming County home and continue to honor the generosity and commitment of our clients and volunteers.” 

2017 Wyoming Foundation grant recipients include: 

    • Arts Council for Wyoming County;

    • Business Education Council, Inc;

    • Eagle Free Library;

    • GLOW YMCA;

    • Shake on the Lake;

    • Warsaw Junior Tigers; and

    • Wyoming Free Circulating Library Association.

The Wyoming Foundation was established in 1974 by Dr. James MacCallum as a way to strengthen the quality of life in Wyoming County. The Foundation encourages charitable giving, assessing and responding to the community’s changing needs and serving as a springboard for local charitable activities. Since then, the Wyoming Foundation, a division of the Community Foundation for Greater Buffalo, has actively supported cultural, educational and human services programs throughout the county. For more information about the Wyoming Foundation’s granting process visit www.wyomingfoundation.org.

Friday, September 22, 2017 at 3:04 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Perry, Arcade.
tue_erin_1.jpg
      Erin True

Erin True, 34, of Perry, was charged Sept. 21 with grand larceny in the fourth degree and identity theft in the third degree. True allegedly used the credit card number from a previous boyfriend to pay $440 on her Dish Network account. Perry Police say the victim contacted police when he noticed discrepancies on his credit card account. True was arraigned in Perry Village Court and put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $1,000. She is due in court at a later date.

Stephanie Larrabee, 27, of Arcade, was charged Sept. 18 with issuing a bad check. Larrabee is accused of writing a check for $294.30, which was returned for non-sufficient funds. She is due in the Town of Sardinia Court later this month.

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