Warsaw

Thursday, March 23, 2017 at 2:55 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Eagle, Warsaw, drugs.

Two Town of Eagle residents are facing numerous drug-related charges following a join investigation between the Wyoming County Jail and Sheriff’s Office Road divisions.

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     Melissa M. Preen

Melissa M. Preen, 25, was stopped on Route 19, Warsaw, for an inspection violation. Deputies say she was driving while her license was suspended from the Town of Castile Court. Additionally, she allegedly showed signs of drug use. Following a roadside investigation and field sobriety testing, she was arrested on suspicion of driving while impaired by drugs. 

She was taken to the county jail for a breath test, while being searched by corrections officers, Preen was allegedly found to be concealing numerous hypodermic needles, drug paraphernalia, cocaine and heroin on her person “in a concealed area.”

Preen then submitted to a drug influence evaluation by a certified drug recognition expert, who alleges she was impaired by the use of multiple substances. 

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     Richard Gargula

Additionally, officials say she was in possession of the drugs with the intent to sell them to Richard Gargula. Gargula was incarcerated in the Wyoming County Jail at the time of the incident.

Preen was charged with numerous vehicle and traffic violations: aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the third degree; driving while ability impaired by a drug; driving while ability impaired by the combination of drugs; criminal possession of a hypodermic instrument; and introduction of dangerous contraband into a jail in the first degree, a Class D felony; and two counts of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree with intent to sell, a Class B felony. 

She was put in Wyoming County Jail on $5,000 cash bail or $10,000 bond. 

Gargula, 33, was charged March 19 with criminal solicitation in the fourth degree. He is accused of soliciting Preen to commit the felony of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree.

Due to Gargula being an inmate at the time of his arrest, his personal belongings were searched by jail staff. Officials say a narcotic preparation was found within his clothing. Subsequently, he was also charged with introduction of dangerous contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony, and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fifth degree – more than 500 mgs. of cocaine, a Class D felony. 

He was jailed on $1,000 cash bail or $2,000 bond for the solicitation charge, and $10,000 cash bail or $20,000 bond for the felony charges. 

Both are due in court at a later date.

Thursday, March 23, 2017 at 2:29 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Perry, Warsaw.
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       Roy A. Newton

A Perry man is facing felony drug charges following a traffic stop on Simmons Road, Perry. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies stopped Roy A. Newton, 44, for allegedly speeding. During the stop, deputies say he exhibited multiple signs of drug use. After allegedly performing poorly on field sobriety testing, he was arrested. 

Newton is accused of possessing eight morphine pills, 7.3 grams of concentrated cannabis, which is a controlled substance known as “dabbing oil,” and other drug paraphernalia. It is reported that the aggregate weight of the “dabbing oil” elevated the drug possession charge to a felony. Additionally, he is accused of possessing the concentrated cannabis with intent to sell it.

Deputies took him to the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office, where a drug recognition expert determined him to be impaired by narcotics and cannabis.

Subsequently, Newton was charged with: two counts of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, both as Class D felonies; criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree; driving while ability impaired by drugs; and driving while ability impaired by the combined influence of drugs. He was also cited for two traffic infractions, speed over 55 mph; and illegal window tint. He was put in Wyoming County Jail on $5,000 cash bail or $10,000 bond.

He is due in the Town of Perry Court April 5.

Monday, March 20, 2017 at 5:56 pm

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Press release (photo submitted):

Wyoming County Sheriff Gregory Rudolph encourages residents to support the New York State Sheriffs’ Institute, which began its annual Honorary Membership drive in Wyoming County this week. The institute was established in 1979 to advance criminal justice education, prevent juvenile delinquency, and support victims of crime and their families. 

Programs include:

    • Sheriffs’ Summer Camp: Almost 900 “economically challenged” children from across New York State attend the camp on Keuka Lake in Steuben and Yates counties. The Sheriffs’ Institute pays all costs for the campers, including transportation, a week of camp, meals, and traditional camp activities like sailing, archery and crafts. The camp is in its 41st year of operation.

    • Criminal Justice Scholarship Program: This provides one scholarship to the Criminal Justice Program at each of New York State’s Community Colleges. The program aims to attract the best and the brightest to the criminal justice vocation.

    • Victim Notification Programs: The Sheriffs’ Victim Hotline provides automated notification to registered victims when an inmate is released. The Sheriffs’ Order of Protection Notification Program allows individuals who have been granted Family Court orders of protection to receive alerts when those orders are served.

“The Sheriff’s Institute is our partner in providing programs that help the people in our communities,” Rudolph said. “But we really rely on the support of our honorary members for the Sheriffs’ Summer Camp. Their support allows us to send economically disadvantaged children to camp. These kids wouldn’t have a chance to go away to camp otherwise.”

For more information about the Sheriffs’ Summer Camp and other Sheriffs’ Institute Programs, visit www.sheriffsinstitute.org. The Institute is a not-for-profit, tax-exempt organization.

For more information, call Pat Hughes at (518) 434-9091 or via email at phughes@nysheriffs.org.

Friday, March 17, 2017 at 2:54 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Castile, Covington, Attica, Bennington, Arcade, Eagle, Warsaw.

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun March 16.

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     Amy Goodenow

Amy Goodenow, who is accused of a crime in Castile, pled not guilty to arson in the third degree, a Class C felony, and criminal mischief in the second degree, a Class D felony. Motions are scheduled May 11. Bail continues at $5,000.

Justin Stanbro, who is accused of a crime in Arcade, had his case adjourned to April 13.

Cheleena Green, who committed a crime in Arcade, pled guilty to assault in the second degree, a Class D felony. The case has been adjourned to June 15 for sentencing. Green is held in the Wyoming County Jail without bail.

Robin Frontuto, who committed a crime in Attica, was sentenced to five years probation, plus fees and surcharges on the conviction of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class D felony.

Lonniqua Williams, who committed a crime in Attica, was sentenced to a one-year conditional discharge, plus fees and surcharges on the conviction of conspiracy in the fifth degree, a Class A misdemeanor. 

Spencer Bressette, who committed a crime in Bennington, pled guilty to criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class D felony. Bressette was sentenced to one year interim probation. Final sentencing is scheduled March 21, 2018.

Mason Maha, who committed a crime in Castile, pled guilty to attempted burglary in the third degree, a Class E felony. Released to the pretrial release program. Sentencing is scheduled June 15.

Aaron Gillard, who committed a crime in Covington, pled guilty to driving while intoxicated and aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the first degree, both are Class E felonies. He was sentenced to one-year interim probation and paid $577.03 in restitution. Final sentencing is scheduled March 1. 

Marie Giambra, who is accused of a crime in Eagle, pled not guilty to burglary in the second degree, a Class C felony, and grand larceny in the fourth degree, a Class E felony. A stay away order of protection was issued. Motions are scheduled May 11. 

Patrick Gugliuzza, who is accused of a crime in Warsaw, pled not guilty to: assault in the second degree, a Class D felony; resisting arrest and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree, both are Class A misdemeanors; and disorderly conduct, a violation. Motions are scheduled May 11. Bail was set at $50,000 cash or $100,000 bond.

The following are from State Correctional Facilities in Attica. 

Bail is set for state inmate cases for two reasons:

    • In the event that the inmates current sentence is overturned on appeal or the inmates sentence is about to expire the bail will kick in on the new case and the inmate would be turned over to the Wyoming County jail while the new case is pending; and

    • When bail is placed on an inmate it follows the inmate so when they are moved to different facilities it is one way for them to be found and also the state system knows there is another case still pending.

Jayme Frontuto is scheduled for sentencing April 27. He is held without bail.

Cesar Aguayo was sentenced to one-and-one-half to three years in prison as a second felony offender, plus fees and surcharges. He was convicted of attempted promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class E felony.

Yhury Marcelo pled not guilty to criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fourth degree, a Class C felony; promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony; and conspiracy in the fourth degree, a Class E felony. Motions are scheduled for today. Bail was set at $5,000.

Jerry Gillard had his case adjourned to April 12.

James Smith pled guilty to promoting prison contraband in the first degree, a Class D felony. Interim sentencing is scheduled June 15.

Thursday, March 16, 2017 at 4:26 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Perry, Warsaw.
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  Charles J. Bozzette

The Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office arrested Charles J. Bozzette March 15 in connection with an alleged rape in the Village of Perry. The 34-year-old Perry man was charged with rape in the third degree.

Bozzette is accused of having sexual intercourse with a 16-year-old female at a home in the Village of Perry. 

He was put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $20,000 cash bail.

The Sheriff’s Office was assisted by the Perry and Warsaw police departments.

Thursday, March 16, 2017 at 9:37 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Perry, Warsaw, Attica, Bennington.

Robert S. Starling, 60, Bayville, N.J., was charged March 12 with aggravated unlicensed operation in the third degree and operating a motor vehicle while using a portable electric device. Starling was charged following a traffic stop on Route 20A, Perry for an alleged cell phone violation. During the stop, deputies say Starling was found to have had his driving privileges suspended in New York State since 2001 for failure to answer a summons. He was put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $500 cash bail. He is due in the Town of Perry Court June 14.

John M. Chaplin, 36, of Attica, was charged March 15 with moved from lane unsafely, driving while intoxicated, driving with a BAC of .08 percent or more, and aggravated DWI with a BAC of .18 percent or more. The Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office received a report of a vehicle in a ditch on Sierk Road, Bennington. During the investigation, deputies say Chaplin said he drove off the road to avoid a deer. Further investigation allegedly revealed he was driving while intoxicated. He was taken to the Sheriff’s Office for a breath test. He is due in the Town of Bennington Court at a later date.

Wesley Goerss, 26, of Scottsville, was arrested March 15 on a Wyoming County Family Court Warrant. Deputies say Goerss turned himself in at the Village of Le Roy Police Department. Subsequently, he was brought back to Wyoming County and put in Wyoming County Jail on $500 cash bail. He is due in Wyoming County Family Court at a later date.

Wednesday, March 15, 2017 at 6:30 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, health, Business, WCCH, ECMC, Warsaw.

Wyoming County Community Health System (WCCH) and Erie County Medical Center Corporation (ECMC) have signed an administrative services agreement to strengthen and reposition WCCH for the future. On March 14, the Wyoming County Board of Supervisors accepted the recommendation of WCCH’s Board of Managers and authorized WCCH Chief Executive Officer Donald Eichenauer to sign the agreement.

As WCCH has expanded its services, it has developed relationships with providers from the Buffalo area. Many of those providers are affiliated with ECMC and/or Kaleida Health. These include Dr. Lindsey Clark, Dr. John Karpie and Dr. Paul Mason, all of who provide orthopedic services at WCCH; and Western New York Urology Associates, a Kaleida Heath entity. Clark is a provider through UBMD Physicians Group. Karpie and Mason are providers with Buffalo Orthopedics Group. Additionally, new agreements are currently being finalized through existing agreements with ECMC or Kaleida Health-related providers, which will enhance Ear, Nose and Throat, Allergy and Nephrology Services at WCCH.

“Like most community hospitals, the path to survival in an ever-evolving health care market will be enhanced by relationships with larger facilities that are able to support the community hospital with administrative and provider resources they are not able to obtain independently,” Eichenauer said. “It is WCCH’s objective to take advantage of the opportunities provided by ECMC and its affiliation with Kaleida Health and the University at Buffalo through their mutual partnership in Great Lakes Health System, which will provide better access to a wide range of health care services at WCCH; we will now look at the necessary steps towards a future management agreement with ECMC.”

The Board of WCCH says it was also impressed with ECMC’s experience and knowledge related to the governmental and human resources requirements of WCCH. Both ECMC and WCCH have employees who are represented by the Civil Service Employees Association Inc. (CSEA). Although an independent Public Benefit Corporation since 2004, ECMC is one of the few remaining county-owned hospitals in the state.

“ECMCC is excited with the board’s decision, which will permit ECMC to work closely with WCCH and share best practices and scale that will create cost reductions and efficiencies,” said ECMC President and CEO Thomas J. Quatroche Jr., Ph.D.

“Importantly, through this agreement, we will integrate our health care service teams to identify opportunities to share practices that will enhance and strengthen the delivery of quality health care services to patients across the entire organization.”

As part of the new relationship, ECMC will also be working with WCCH to provide upgraded administrative and financial management resources and support.

“Through a deliberate and careful process over several months, the necessary steps have been taken toward an administrative services agreement with ECMC that will maintain the financial viability of WCCH,” said Board of Supervisors Chairman Douglas Berwanger. “It will preserve quality health care at the hospital well into the future.”

Since October 2012, WCCH has had a previous collaboration agreement with (University of Rochester) UR Medicine, Rochester. WCCH anticipates having a continued positive relationship with UR Medicine and the services and providers it supplies to the hospital.

WCCH is a 62-bed rural, acute-care hospital accredited by The Joint Commission. It is the sole inpatient provider for Wyoming County, which has a population of approximately 43,000. In addition to an Acute Care Hospital, its services include an attached 138-bed Nursing Home, Adult Day Health Care, and an Inpatient Behavioral Health Unit. The hospital has approximately 3,000 inpatient admissions, and 14,000 Emergency Department visits per year.

Its mission is to provide outstanding healthcare services and to have a positive impact on the health of its rural community. For more information visit  www.wcchs.net or its Facebook page.

The ECMC Corporation was established as a New York State Public Benefit Corporation. Since 2004 it has included an advanced academic medical center with 602 inpatient beds, on- and off-campus health centers, more than 30 outpatient specialty care services and Terrace View, a 390-bed, long-term care facility.  

ECMC is Western New York’s only Level 1 Adult Trauma Center, as well as a regional center for burn care, behavioral health services, transplantation, medical oncology and head and neck cancer care, rehabilitation, and a major teaching facility for the University at Buffalo. Most ECMC physicians, dentists and pharmacists are dedicated faculty members of the university and/or members of a private practice plan.

For more information visit ecmc.edu and follow ECMC on social media via Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.

Tuesday, March 14, 2017 at 3:01 pm

Closings and cancellations in Wyoming County for March 14, as of 2:53 p.m.:
Closed:

    • Adult Day Healthcare Center at Wyoming County Community Hospital;

    • Gainesville Public Library;

    • Warsaw Public Library. The board meeting is postponed until next week;

    • Genesee Community College -- all locations;

    • Literacy West NY, Warsaw;

    • Lumberyard Restaurant, Perry;

    • Oak Orchard Health, Warsaw;

    • Perry Library; and
    • Warsaw Head Start.

Canceled:
    • Warsaw Moose Lodge -- Bingo tonight is canceled;
    • Warsaw Planning Board has canceled its meeting;

    • Warsaw Write Connection group meeting at Warsaw Library is canceled;
    • Wyoming County Cooperative Extension -- VFD Regulations for Livestock.

  • Owners and Bee Keepers - meeting at the Wyoming County Ag Center is canceled; and

    • Wyoming County Office For the Aging: No home-delivered meals today
 and Medicare 101 class for this evening rescheduled for March 29. Call for reservations.

Closings and cancellations for Tuesday:
    • Silver Springs food pantry; and
    • St. Mary's Senior Lunch in Silver Springs is canceled.

Tuesday, March 14, 2017 at 9:58 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Warsaw, Wyoming County Court, Attica.

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun March 10.

Jennifer Galioto, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, admitted to a violation of probation. She was returned to probation.

Philip Lingenfelter, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, admitted to a violation of probation. He was returned to probation to be transferred to Cattaraugus County.

The following are inmates in a State Correctional Facility in Attica and were in Wyoming County Court before Mohun March 13.

Javon Woods pled guilty to attempted assault in the second degree, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled May 17.

Benedict Agostini had his case adjourned to April 12.

Neil Allen had his case adjourned to March 29.

Joshua Nieves pled guilty to tempering with physical evidence, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled May 17.

Monday, March 13, 2017 at 6:23 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, Warsaw, Attica, news.
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  Michael A. Young   Victoria L. Young

A couple charged last week with multiple offenses in Warsaw, garners identical charges, plus more, out of the Village of Attica.

Michael A. Young, 35, and Victoria L. Young, 22, were stopped on Main Street, Attica, March 7 for following too closely, reckless driving, and imprudent speed.

During the stop, Michael allegedly told officers that his wife was pregnant and was in labor. At that time, law enforcement allowed the couple to continue to the hospital.

Following the stop in Attica, the Youngs’ were stopped a short time later by Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies. During the stop on North Main Street, Warsaw, deputies say the vehicle was found to be uninsured and had a suspended vehicle registration.

Although the car was registered to Victoria, deputies say Michael was driving the car and Victoria was the passenger. It is alleged that she told deputies she was 38 weeks pregnant and was in labor, at which time the vehicle was escorted directly to the hospital. 

According to the report, after being treated, it was determined that she was not pregnant and she had lied to the police about it.

Victoria was charged with falsely reporting an incident in the third degree, out of Attica, as well as from the stop in Warsaw.

In addition to the above charges, deputies say Victoria was wanted on a warrant by the Olean Police Department on a petit larceny charge. She was subsequently arrested and turned over to Olean Police.

Michael was charged out of both Attica and Warsaw with criminal contempt in the second degree, operating a vehicle with a suspended registration, and operating a motor vehicle without insurance. Attica charges also include, speed not reasonable and prudent, following too closely, and reckless driving.

Police also say there was an active stay away order of protection in place on Michael, which ordered him to stay away from Victoria. 

Both are due in the Village of Warsaw Court April 10 and in the Village of Attica Court at a later date. 

The vehicle was towed from the scene, and the license plates seized and returned to the Department of Motor Vehicles. 

See related: Law and Order: Former Perry man charged with scheme to defraud

Monday, March 13, 2017 at 5:47 pm

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From left: Lindsay Chamberlain, of Wyoming, representing Collegiate Cornell Farm Bureau; Ben Restivo, Future Farmers of America member, and Brian Parker, representing Wyoming County Farm Bureau, with Sen. Patrick Gallivan.

Press release (photo submitted):

Members from the Wyoming County Farm Bureau spent two days in Albany last week, meeting with lawmakers to highlight the organization’s state public policy priorities for the year.

The county Farm Bureau hosted a table at the Taste of New York Reception for state lawmakers, commissioners, and staff, which featured local farm products. Members also participated in the annual Lobby Day on Tuesday where they met with both their local senator and assemblyman as well as New York City lawmakers that the county Farm Bureau adopted.

At State Capitol, county members advocated for a number of priorities this year, including securing a refundable investment tax credit for farmers. With 2015 farm income down nearly 20 percent to $5.3 billion across the state, according to the latest figures from the National Agriculture Statistics Service, tools need to be in place to help farmers weather the downturn. This initiative would incentivize farm investment to meet the needs of global competition.

Additionally, advocates pushed to double the minimum wage tax credit from $30 million to $60 million. The first step of the minimum wage hike climbed at the beginning of the year on its way to $15 an hour for farms on Long Island and $12.50 for Upstate farmers. New York Farm Bureau (NYFB) led the way in opposition to the hike last year, resulting in a $250 tax credit per employee for this first year of the increase. That will cover only a small fraction of what it will cost family farms to implement the wage hike.

State funding for critical farm programs is another top priority for Farm Bureau. Governor Andrew Cuomo included a number of things in his budget plan which would help agriculture in the state. This includes funding for the Environmental Protection Fund (EPA), which will assist farms with water quality, conservation and farmland protection programs, as well as necessary investments into animal health programs. 

Farm Bureau asked lawmakers to restore funding for promotion and research programs that also benefit agriculture. NYFB also supports the governor’s proposed $2 billion clean water infrastructure program that includes $70 million for nutrient management and conservation programs to reduce farm runoff.

The Farm to Food Bank bill is another top priority for NYFB members who have seen the governor veto the popular legislation the past two years. Members asked their lawmakers to include the tax credit that encourages greater fresh food donations to regional food banks and local food pantries to be included in their one-house budget bills.

These priorities are based on member-approved public policies that originate every year at the county Farm Bureau level and are passed by the full delegate body at NYFB’s State Annual Meeting in December.

In addition to advocating for priorities with lawmakers, county Farm Bureau members also participated in a special panel discussion with the commissioners from the departments of Agriculture and Markets, Environmental Conservation, and Labor.

The Wyoming County Farm Bureau is dedicated to advocate for public policies that will not only benefit agriculture but support rural communities as a whole.

NYFB is the State’s largest agricultural lobbying/trade organization and is “the voice of New York agriculture.” It is dedicated to solving the economic and public policy issues challenging the agricultural community.

Monday, March 13, 2017 at 9:36 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, education, Attica, Warsaw, Portageville.

Medaille College has named the following students to the dean's list for the fall 2016 semester. Students that meet the requirements of a minimum of 12 credit hours and earn a grade point average of 3.5 or higher for all credit hours carried during that semester are placed on the Dean's List

    • Emily Fisher, of Warsaw;

    • Ashley Richley, of Attica; and

    • Lacey Wilmot, of Portageville.

Medaille is a private, four-year college four-year college with campuses in Buffalo, Rochester and online. The college offers associate, bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees in a variety of fields. To learn more visit www.medaille.edu.

Friday, March 10, 2017 at 6:32 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Warsaw, Perry, Gainesville.

Jeremiah J. Cieszynski, 50, of Warsaw, was arrested March 9 on a warrant out of Cattaraugus County for failure to pay support. He is being held at the Cattaraugus County Jail, Little Valley.

Benishio C. Coger, 21, of Albion, was charged March 9 with criminal contempt in the second degree. Perry Police report Coger was found at the home of a female acquaintance who has an order of protection barring him from having contact with her. Police allegedly found him at the residence by Wyoming County Probation when they were checking on a probationer and assisted in the investigation. Coger was put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $2,000 cash bail. He is due in court at a later date.

Debra A. Gross, 52, of Gainesville, was charged March 9 with aggravated unlicensed operator of a motor vehicle in the third degree, unlicensed operator, and inadequate plate lamp. Perry Police say Gross was stopped on Covington Street, Perry, following a license check which determined her driver’s license was suspended. She is due in Perry Village Court March 14.

Thursday, March 9, 2017 at 4:49 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Warsaw, Attica, Covington.

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun March 9.

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      Michael Lantain

Michael Lantain, who is accused of a crime in Warsaw, pled not guilty to: predatory sexual assault against a child, a Class A-II felony; 11 counts of use of a child in a sexual performance as a sexually motivated felony, a Class C felony; three counts of sexual abuse in the first degree, a Class D felony; 11 counts of possessing a sexual performance by a child, a Class E felony; endangering the welfare of a child, a misdemeanor. An order of protection has been issued. The case has been adjourned to May 11 for motions. Bail was set at $100,000.

Philip Baker, who committed a crime in Attica, was sentenced to five years probation on the conviction of criminal contempt in the first degree, a Class E felony. An order of protection was also issued and he is responsible for all fees and surcharges incurred.

Aaron Gillard, who is accused of a crime in Covington, had his case adjourned to March 16.

Quinton Murphy, who is accused of a crime in Warsaw, pled not guilty to: driving while intoxicated and aggravated unlicensed operation in the first degree, both are Class E felonies; operating a motor vehicle without a court-ordered ignition interlock device; driving while ability impaired by alcohol; no inspection and insufficient headlights. The case has been adjourned to March 30 for conference and May 11 for motions. Bail continues at $2,500.

The following were in court before Mohun March 6 and 7.

Mark Maussner, who committed a crime in Attica, pled guilty to petit larceny. He was sentenced to a one year conditional discharge and restitution of $4,400, which was paid in full.

Tammy Miller, who committed a crime in Attica, pled guilty to promoting prison contraband in the first degree. Sentencing is scheduled May 25.

Thursday, March 9, 2017 at 4:25 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Perry, Gainesville, Sheldon, Attica, Warsaw.
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 Dennis Rawleigh Jr.

Dennis N. Rawleigh Jr., 46, of Batavia, formerly of Perry, was charged March 7 with one count of scheme to defraud in the second degree, a Class A misdemeanor. Rawleigh is accused of not completing work he received payments for in November. At that time, he was doing business as Rawleigh’s Tear Down and allegedly received more than $15,000 in payments from a Town of Gainesville woman to perform work on two houses she owns in Perry and Gainesville. The woman reportedly told Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies that very little work was completed on the Perry home and none on the Gainesville residence. A second victim, a male from the Town of Sheldon, reported paying Rawleigh a $3,200 down payment to tear down a barn. It is said that he attempted to pull the large barn down with a chain and his pickup truck with negative results. He is accused of making no further attempts at pulling the barn down since June 2015. Rawleigh is due in Gainesville Town Court later this month.

Daniel Thomas Henning, 36, of Attica, was charged March 8 with driving while intoxicated, driving with a BAC of .08 or higher, inadequate exhaust, driving on sidewalk, and unlicensed operator of a motor vehicle. Genesee County Sheriff’s deputies arrested Henning following a car accident on Route 5 in the City of Batavia. He is due in the City of Batavia Court April 19.

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     Michael A. Young      Victoria L. Young

Michael A. Young, 35, and Victoria L. Young, 22, both of Attica, were charged March 7 with multiple offenses following a traffic stop on North Main Street, Warsaw. Victoria was charged with falsely reporting an incident in the third degree. Michael was charged with criminal contempt in the second degree, operating a vehicle while registration suspended, and operating a motor vehicle without insurance. Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say they stopped the pair because the vehicle was allegedly found to have no insurance and a suspended vehicle registration. Although the car was registered to Victoria, deputies say Michael was driving the car and Victoria was the passenger. It is alleged that she told deputies she was 38 weeks pregnant and was in labor, at which time the vehicle was escorted directly to the hospital. According to the report, after being treated it was determined that she was not pregnant and she had lied to the police about it. Deputies also found Victoria was wanted on a warrant by the Olean Police Department on a petit larceny charge. She was subsequently arrested and turned over to Olean Police. Police also say there was an active stay away order of protection in place on Michael, which ordered him to stay away from Victoria. Both are due in the Village of Warsaw Court April 10. The vehicle was towed from the scene, and the license plates seized and returned to the Department of Motor Vehicles. 

Thursday, March 9, 2017 at 6:43 am

High winds yesterday left thousands of residents without power. While power was restored to many customers, power companies report 6,350 residents are still without power as of 6:15 a.m..

RG&E customers without power: 

    • Arcade – 25 

    • Eagle – 27

NYSEG customers without power:

    • Bennington – 1,526

    • Castile – 10

    • Gainesville – 46

    • Java – 1,199

    • Middlebury – 29

    • Sheldon – 1,341

    • Warsaw – 1

National Grid customers without power:

    • Eagle, Bliss, Java, Gainesville area – approximately 589

    • Varysburg, Warsaw, Attica area – approximately – 1,557.

Power companies have been working through the night to restore electricity to county homes and continue this morning.

Tuesday, March 7, 2017 at 10:03 am

The Wyoming County Government Center is “turning green” for the month of March to celebrate the Girl Scouts, the 4-H program and cookie sales, and Wyoming County’s biggest producer – agriculture.

While the color green is most often associated with Saint Patrick’s Day when March rolls around, these organizations allude to the “luck of the Irish” as well. Subsequently, the Wyoming County Board of Supervisors has proclaimed March 2017 to be Girl Scout and Agriculture month – March 21 is National Agriculture Day and March 12 signifies the inception of the first Girl Scout troop in the United States.

This month, the Girl Scouts celebrate not only 105 years as an organization but also 100 years of their most successful fundraising program – the annual cookie sale.

The Girl Scout program was founded by Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low, with the help of Sir Robert Baden-Powell, the founder of the Scouting movement. Low believed in the power of every girl. 

Low had joined the Girl Guide movement while in Scotland and in 1911 formed a group of Girl Guides while there. When she returned to the United States in 1912, she established the first American Girl Guide troop in Savannah, Ga.

It wasn’t until 1915 that the United States’ Girl Guides became known as the Girl Scouts. 

Modeling the program after the Boy Scouts, she was inspired by its stress of military preparedness and having fun, she encouraged the girls to become self-sufficient. 

While in Scotland, the group learned how to spin wool and care for livestock. She also taught them knot tying, map reading, kitting cooking and first aid. With the help of her friends in the military the girls also learned drilling, signaling and camping.

When she brought the program to the United States, she spread the movement as a way to help girls learn practical skills and build character. 

Although Low died in Savannah on Jan. 17, 1927, her vision lives on in the 1.9 million girls and 800,000 volunteer that continue the Girl Scouts worldwide.

The 4-H programs are based in science, healthy living and citizenship. It is backed by a network of 100 public universities and a community of 4-H volunteers and professionals. 

Through hands-on learning, youth build not only confidence, creativity and curiosity, but also life skills such as leadership and resiliency.

Grounded in the belief that kids learn best by doing for more than 100 years, 4-H has become the nation’s largest youth development organization. 

In the late 1800s, researchers noticed that young people were more open to new thinking in agricultural practices than their adult counterparts. In this way, it was the younger generations that introduced new agriculture technology to communities.

Today, 4-H’ers tackle issues such as global food security, climate change, as well as animal sciences, robotics, environmental protection and computer science to take on the challenges of the 21st century.

The program empowers the youngsters to be well-informed citizens who are actively engaged in their communities.

The month of March also signifies the start of its annual cookie sale. From March 7 through 21, cookies will be on sale.

“This is Wyoming County’s annual fundraiser that helps support programming in the county,” said 4-H educator Holly Harwood. “Proceeds from the sale allow youth to earn camperships at Wyomoco supports educational opportunities throughout the year, supports supplemental project and teaching materials, scholarships and more.”

Harwood says its these opportunities allow the youth to travel outside the county and the state to see the different careers available to them in agriculture, as well as meet other kids who are of similar mindset. It also allows kids to “build friendships that last a lifetime.”

And of course, one cannot travel about in Wyoming County without taking note of the rolling hills dotted with cows, corn, and other crops. These crops make the county number one in the production of milk, potatoes, hay, honey, and corn silage in New York State.

The county boasts 1.1 billion pounds of milk produced annually – 129.5 million gallons, 713 farms and 230,000 acres of cultivated farmland. The greens and golds of the county’s landscape is in large part due to 60 percent of its land being dedicated to farming. 

The economic vitality of Wyoming County is dependent on the food and fiber products agriculture plays a role in. Additionally, the county’s strong agribusiness ensures the maintenance of a strong economy.

Tuesday, March 7, 2017 at 9:59 am

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The Wyoming County Chamber & Tourism announces that Merle Maple Farm of Attica, has been named the 2017 Agribusiness of the year. The annual award was presented at the 10th Annual Pride of Agriculture dinner Saturday at the North Java Fire Department, Java.

“On behalf of the Board of Directors, we were very pleased to present the Agribusiness award to Lyle and Dottie Merle and Merle Maple Farm for their commitment to Wyoming County’s agriculture industry and their support of the community,” said Chamber President Scott Gardner. “The Merle’s are a strong voice for the maple industry, dedicated to education and their craft, and are outstanding agricultural ambassadors for Wyoming County.”

In his opening remarks, Gardner touched upon the legacy those in agriculture leave.

“In that word are meanings like family, tradition, commitment, passion, and an eye to the future. The legacy is borne out of the blood, sweat and tears of our pasts, the hard decisions and the growing pains, achievements of innovation, and knowing that you’re doing this for posterity.

“To leave a legacy you have to love what you do and instill that in your children and grandchildren by fostering pride, purpose, and ownership, through dedication and a belief in the ‘what’ and the ‘why’ agriculture is important.”

The annual agribusiness award is given to a business that exemplifies the following criteria: contributions to the economic vitality and quality of life of Wyoming County, capital investments, business expansions, job growth, community involvement, and their contributions that strengthen their industry sector.

The Pride of Agriculture dinner also featured the annual presentation of the coveted Pride of Agriculture -- Good Neighbor Award, given to Charles and Velma Seewaldt, of Varysburg, and the new Friend of Wyoming County Agriculture award given to Jodi Smith, of Arcade. Both awards are given by Cornell Cooperative Extension of Wyoming County, the Wyoming County Farm Bureau, and the Wyoming County Chamber & Tourism offices. 

See related: Merle Maple Farm awarded Agribusiness of the Year

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Monday, March 6, 2017 at 9:30 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, education, Warsaw, Wyoming, Attica, Perry, Arcade.

The following local residents made the dean's list at Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) for fall semester 2016-2017:

    • Katie Adinolfe, who is studying in the diagnostic medical sonography program; Nicholas Henderson, who is studying in the game design and development program: Monika Mc Keown, who is studying in the computing security program; Tyler Perry, who is studying in the mechanical engineering technology program; and Hanna Tangeman, who is studying in the graphic design program, all of Warsaw;

    • Dylan Fisher, who is studying in the packaging science program; and Matthew Santullo, who is studying in the mechanical engineering program, both of Wyoming;    

    • Justin Napieralski, of Attica, who is studying in the mechanical engineering program;

    • Konner Narowski, who is studying in the packaging science program; and Noah Wilson, who is studying in the game design and development program, both of Perry; and

    • Sam Tillinghast, of Arcade, who is studying in the computer science program.

Degree-seeking undergraduate students are eligible for dean's list if their term grade point average is greater than or equal to 3.400; they do not have any grades of “incomplete", "D" or "F"; and they have registered for, and completed, at least 12 credit hours

Founded in 1829, RIT enrolls about 19,000 students in more than 200 career-oriented and professional programs, making it among the largest private universities in the United States.

The university is internationally recognized and ranked for academic leadership in business, computing, engineering, imaging science, liberal arts, sustainability, and fine and applied arts. RIT also offers unparalleled support services for deaf and hard-of-hearing students. The cooperative education program is one of the oldest and largest in the nation. Global partnerships include campuses in China, Croatia, Dubai and Kosovo.

Monday, March 6, 2017 at 9:15 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, Army, Warsaw.

Maj. Gen. Anthony P. German, the Adjutant General of New York, recently announced the recent service accomplishment of members of the New York Army National Guard. The announcement recognizes local residents of their initial commitment to serve community, state and nation.

The newest citizen soldiers to complete Army basic combat training and advanced individual training were welcomed to their units during a New York Army National Guard battle handoff ceremony Feb. 12.

Pvt. Kyle Navarra, of Warsaw, was formally welcomed into the Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 2nd Squadron, 101st Cavalry (Reconnaissance, Surveillance and Target Acquisition) during a transition ceremony at the Patriot Way Soldier Readiness Center in Rochester.

The ceremony marks his completion of the National Guard Recruit Sustainment Program, a preparatory training program that provides new recruits with training, lessons and skills to excel at their initial military training.

Navarra will now embark on his traditional National Guard service to state and nation as part-time citizen soldier.

"The handoff ceremony marks the introduction of our new soldiers to their unit and receiving new shoulder insignia, highlighting the start of their military service here in New York to serve state and nation," German said. "I congratulate these soldiers for their initial accomplishments in training as their first milestone of a career as a citizen soldier.

"Every soldier or airman in every unit across our state plays an important role in defending our homeland and serving our nation. We welcome these newest citizen soldiers as part of our New York National Guard family."

For more information about the New York Army National Guard, visit www.dmna.ny.gov or www.1800goguard.com.

The New York National Guard (New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs) is the state's executive agency responsible to the governor for managing New York's Military Forces, which consists of nearly 20,000 members of the New York Army National Guard, the New York Air National Guard, the New York Naval Militia, and the New York Guard.

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