Warsaw

Friday, August 18, 2017 at 11:14 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Warsaw, Perry, Covington.

The following was in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun Aug. 16.

Patrick Hill, an inmate at a State Correctional Facility, pled guilty to criminal possession of a controlled substance (Marinol) in the fifth degree, a Class D felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled Sept. 20.

The following were in County Court before Mohun Aug. 17.

Scott Moulton, who committed a crime in Covington, was sentenced to two years in prison with two years post release supervision with Willard on the conviction of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony. Willard is a Drug Treatment Campus (DTC) operated by the NYS Department of Correctional Services and Community Supervision (DOCCS) in collaboration with OASAS (Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services). It was created in 1995 as a new sentencing option for low-level drug offenders and parole violators who previously would have been sent to a traditional prison. The Willard program was created as an intermediate sanction — “with teeth” — to deal with the problem of relapse. He was also sentenced to a one-year conditional discharge, driver’s license revocation, and a $500 fine on the conviction of operating a motor vehicle impaired by drugs in the first degree, a misdemeanor.

William Stelmack, who committed a crime in Perry, waived indictment on three counts of criminal contempt in the first degree, a Class E felony, and resisting arrest, a misdemeanor. He pled guilty to criminal contempt in the first degree and resisting arrest. An order of protection was signed and served. The case has been adjourned to Nov. 9 for sentencing.

Ashley King, who committed a crime in Perry, waived indictment on aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the first degree, a Class E felony; and driving while ability impaired by the combined influence of drugs or of drugs and alcohol, and driving while ability impaired by drugs, both as misdemeanors; and unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle. King pled guilty to aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the first degree. Sentencing is scheduled Nov. 9. She was released on her own recognizance.

Daniel Bailey, who committed a crime in Perry, waived indictment on burglary in the second degree, a Class C felony. He pled guilty to attempted burglary in the second degree, a Class D violent felony. Sentencing is scheduled Nov. 9

Melissa Baker, who committed a crime in Warsaw, waived indictment on criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fourth degree, a Class C felony, and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fifth degree, a Class D felony. She pled guilty to criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fourth degree. Sentencing is scheduled Sept. 28. Bail was set at $15,000.

Richard Gargula, who committed a crime in Warsaw, admitted to violating sentencing cap. Bail was revoked and he is being held without bail in the Wyoming County Jail. The case has been adjourned to Aug. 31.

Franklin Cook, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, was arraigned on a violation of probation. He is being held without bail in the Wyoming County Jail. The case has been adjourned to Aug. 31.

Thursday, August 17, 2017 at 1:31 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Warsaw.
Event Date and Time: 
August 20, 2017 - 10:00am

Valley Chapel Free Methodist Church is celebrating 20 years of ministry at its current location at 3415 Route 19 in Warsaw.

Events begin at 10 a.m. Aug. 20 with refreshments, followed by a worship service with guest speaker Doug Newton. At noon there will be a picnic lunch, a bounce house for kids, as well as other entertainment.

Thursday, August 17, 2017 at 1:29 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, Warsaw.

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Photo from Valley Chapel Free Methodist Church website

Valley Chapel Free Methodist Church is celebrating 20 years of ministry at its current location at 3415 Route 19 in Warsaw.

Events begin at 10 a.m. Aug. 20 with refreshments, followed by a worship service with guest speaker Doug Newton. At noon there will be a picnic lunch, a bounce house for kids, as well as other entertainment.

Newton is a co-founder of the National Prayer Ministry of the FMC-USA and former senior pastor of Greenville (Ill.) Free Methodist Church. Additionally, he served as editor of Light & Life magazine for 15 years, which won the Evangelical Press Association’s “Award of Excellence” for denominational magazines in 2000 and 2002.

Valley Chapel’s roots in Warsaw began on Center Street in the Village. In 1997 its new building was erected, and dedicated in August of the same year.

The church hosts programs such as Master’s Hands, Foodlink, Bread of Life Community Dinner, Caring Hands & Hearts, and many other programs to serve the community.

For more information about the church visit www.valleychapel.org

Thursday, August 17, 2017 at 12:51 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Warsaw, Pike, Perry, Wyoming.
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   Richard F. Gargula

Richard F. Gargula, 34, of Pike, was charged Aug. 17 with one count of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree and one count of criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree. Gargula is accused of selling heroin to an agent of the Wyoming County Drug Task Force in May while in the Village of Warsaw. He was arraigned in Warsaw Village Court and returned to the Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $50,000 cash bail on this new charge. He was already in jail on an unrelated charge. The Task Force includes members from the Sheriff’s Office as well as the Arcade, Attica, Perry, and Warsaw Police departments. Task Force members remind residents that suspected illegal drug activity can be reported to the confidential drug tip line, (585) 786-8965.

Jeffrey Rigerman, 33, of Jamestown, was arrested Aug. 10 on a Family Court warrant for failure to obey a support order. Rigerman was found at his residence by the Jamestown Police Department and then turned over to the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office. He was put in Wyoming County Jail on $5,000 bail.

Franklin Cook, 35, of Wyoming, was arrested Aug. 16 on a Wyoming County Superior Court violation of probation warrant. Cook was found at his home in the Town of Middlebury and taken into custody without incident. He was put in Wyoming County Jail where he will be held until the next available Superior Court date.

Matthew Wendt, 31, of Angelica, was arrested on a Failure to Pay Fine warrant issued by the Village of Warsaw Court. Wendt was taken into custody at a home on Water Street in the Village of Perry without incident. He was then taken to the Village of Warsaw Court where he was arraigned and released after paying the remaining balance on his fines.

Thursday, August 17, 2017 at 9:38 am
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, Warsaw, health.

Press release:

Oak Orchard provides primary, dental and vision care for more than 21,000 adults and children in rural areas and small communities across Western New York and the Finger Lakes. It started in 1966 as a small health project serving migrant workers and has grown into an integrated, federally funded health center with locations in Albion and Lyndonville, Orleans County; Brockport, Monroe County; Hornell, Steuben County; and Main Street in Warsaw.

Oak Orchard Health has worked closely with UR Medicine physicians and hospitals for a number of years. A new agreement formalizes their institutional collaboration, and is expected to make it easier for Oak Orchard’s adult and pediatric patients to receive care from UR Medicine professionals — including telemedicine consultations for specialty care services such as behavioral and mental health.

“As we look to reduce barriers and address other critical gaps in rural health care, collaborations such as this make good sense,” said James J. Cummings, chief executive officer of Oak Orchard Health. “This is not just great news for our patients; it is great news for our communities at large, especially during this time of concern and uncertainty regarding health care. This relationship enhances the high-quality primary care, dental care and vision services for which Oak Orchard has become known.”

Mark B. Taubman, M.D., CEO of the University of Rochester Medical Center and UR Medicine, said the Oak Orchard agreement supports URMC’s strategy for increasing access to high-quality UR Medicine care for families across Upstate New York. Along with Strong Memorial and Highland hospitals in Monroe County, URMC’s affiliates include F.F. Thompson Hospital in Canandaigua, Noyes Memorial Hospital in Dansville, and Jones Memorial Hospital in Wellsville. UR Medicine professionals also provide care to patients at the Strong West medical campus in Brockport, St. James Mercy Hospital in Hornell and Wyoming County Community Hospital in Warsaw.

“UR Medicine has outstanding providers in a full range of specialties,” Taubman said. “The goal of our regional strategy is to make these services as accessible as possible to patients throughout the region. We have great regard for the Oak Orchard Health organization and look forward to expanding the range of services available to Oak Orchard patients as part of this agreement.”

Oak Orchard Health will continue to maintain previously established relationships with other area health care providers and social service agencies.

Friday, August 11, 2017 at 4:34 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, Warsaw, WCCH.

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Press release, photo submitted.

In October 2015, Wyoming County Community Health System (WCCHS) received approval from the New York State Department of Transportation for $37,527 in grant funding for the purchase of a vehicle with wheelchair and occupant restraint system. The vehicle is essential to transport health system patients and residents to medical appointments and community outings, and on July 25, the long‑awaited bus was delivered.

The funding was made available under the Federal Transit Administration's Enhanced Mobility of Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities program. The bus has a seating capacity for four passengers and three wheelchairs and will improve accessibility and mobility for seniors and persons with disabilities where public transit services are unavailable, insufficient or inappropriate.

Skilled Nursing Facility residents and Adult Day Health Care registrants are extremely excited to have the new bus in time to go to the Wyoming County Fair, hospital officials say. It will also be used to transport residents to other special activities such as visits to local parks, scenic tours, watching the Warsaw Fourth of July parade, and more. The new bus allows WCCHS to provide the best quality of life for its residents and give them the opportunity to connect with the community.

Thursday, August 10, 2017 at 4:05 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, fire, Warsaw.

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Press release:

Congressman Chris Collins (NY-27) announced $111,958 in federal funding for the Village of Warsaw Fire Department and $83,334 in federal funding for the Cowlesville Fire Company.

Both of these grants were allocated through the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Assistance to Firefighters Grant (AFG) program. The program is designed to help first responders improve their capability to respond to fires and emergencies of all types.

“Our courageous firefighters must be able to operate effectively when responding to any type of emergency in our communities,” Collins said. “The AFG program has helped NY-27 fire departments purchase new equipment, make improvements to their communication systems, and keep their members safe. I was proud to work with the Village of Warsaw Fire Department and the South Wales Fire District No. 1 to secure this $160,514 in federal funding so they can continue protecting their members and fellow neighbors.”

The Warsaw Fire Department will use funds to purchase new fire hoses and nozzles. The equipment will help the department meet safety standards and mitigate their ongoing maintenance and repair costs.

“This important federal grant will allow our department to update outdated equipment that will allow us to better serve our community,” said Warsaw Fire Chief Joe Cummins. “I appreciate Representative Collins’ efforts and we will continue to work with him on issues related to the fire service.”

The Cowlesville Fire Company will use this $83,334 federal grant to purchase new emergency radios. The radios will significantly improve the company’s operational efficiency when responding to emergencies of all types.

“This important federal funding will allow our department to purchase updated radio and communications equipment,” said Cowlesville Assistant Fire Chief John Taylor. “This is critical for keeping our members safe and effectively protecting the community.”

The AFG Grant Program provides direct funding assistance to fire departments, State Fire Training Academies, and non-affiliated EMS organizations. The purpose is to enhance their response capabilities and to more effectively protect the health and safety of both the public and emergency response personnel with respect to fire and all other hazards.

Wednesday, August 9, 2017 at 7:12 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, Business, events, Perry, Warsaw.

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When Gary and Betty Burley began farming in 1981 they had a dream of one day producing an added-value product. On Sunday, the Wyoming County Chamber & Tourism Office, along with friends, family, and local officials celebrated their lifelong dream with a ribbon cutting, officially opening the East Hill Creamery in Perry.

Plans for the creamery began in 2011 when thoughts of passing their farm on to the next generation took hold. The Burleys weren’t quite ready to retire and felt the timing was right to pursue their dream. Four years later, construction of the plant began and by 2016 the first of many cheeses began aging in the caves – an enclosed environmentally controlled area used specifically to age cheese.

The Burleys started their farm with a small herd of 18 cows on 100 acres of farmland on the East Hill (Route 20A) in Warsaw. Today, East Hill Farms milks 700 cows in a rotational grazing system. When deciding on what types of cheeses to make, they chose to make a product that would emphasize the flavors in the milk derived from the grasses, herbs and flowers their cows eat in the pasture.

All of the cheeses at East Hill Creamery are produced with raw milk, meaning, the milk is not pasteurized before it is made into cheese. The cheese goes through a 60-day aging process that naturally pasteurizes it. The French Alpine style of cheeses allows the Burleys to exhibit the high quality, grass-fed cow's milk that they use to produce the cheese.

“What a great day it is for East Hill Creamery, Wyoming County, and our business community,” said Wyoming County Chamber of Commerce President Scott Gardner. “We are so fortunate to have a great business that is sourcing local dairy, producing world-class cheese, and providing jobs. Congratulations to Gary and Betty Burley and thank you for making the investment here in Wyoming County.”

The couple also introduced their family and employees during the ceremony and gave an emotional thank you to everyone gathered for the strong support their business has received since opening.

Several local restaurants hosted food stations throughout the open house including the Hole in the Wall Restaurant in Perry, Glen Iris Inn in Letchworth State Park, and Wendy’s Pantry & Country Mouse Tea House, and Suzea’s Gluten Free Bakery and Café, both in Mt. Morris. The eateries provided food made with East Hill Creamery cheeses. The Wyoming County Dairy Princess, Kim Evans, was also on hand with members of her royal court including Dairy Princess alternate Danielle Herrick, and Dairy ambassadors Abby Schreiber and Brenda Martin.  

East Hill Creamery offers a wide array of products: including their signature cheeses, cheese baskets and trays; East Hill Creamery merchandise; grass-fed butter and crème fraiche from Kriemhild Dairy Products; fresh bread and baked goods from the Hole in the Wall Restaurant on Saturdays; olive oils and balsamic vinegars from Cosimano and Ferrari; fresh pasta from Bozza Pasta; truffles and barks from Dolce Bella Artisan Chocolates; local honey from Log Cabin Acres and Castile Cider Mill; beef sticks from Wilson Beef Farm; local eggs, and local maple syrup.

Regular business hours are Friday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. More information on East Hill Creamery, located at 346 S. Main St. can be found by calling (585) 237-3622 or at www.easthillcreamery.com.

See related: The cheese industry is making a comeback in Perry

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Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at 7:17 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Bliss, Java, Sheldon, Perry, Gainesville, Warsaw.

Rhiannon A. Wilson, 22, and a 17-year-old female, both of Bliss, were arrested Aug. 4 following a complaint of a female allegedly injecting drugs while seated inside a vehicle in the Tops Friendly Markets parking lot in the Town of Warsaw. Following an investigation, Wilson was charged with: criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony; tampering with physical evidence, a Class E felony; and criminal possession of a hypodermic instrument, a Class A misdemeanor. The 17-year-old was charged with criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony, and criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree, a Class B felony. Deputies say, Wilson, the driver of the vehicle, was in possession of two bags of heroin with intent to sell them, dumped heroin from two bags onto the ground when officers approached the vehicle and was in possession of two syringes used for injecting heroin. The teen, who was the front seat passenger, is accused of being in possession of 21 bags of heroin with intent to sell them, and selling two bags of heroin. Both women were arraigned in the Town of Warsaw Court and are due back in court Aug. 14. Wilson was put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $5,000 cash bail or $10,000 bond. The teen was also put in jail in lieu of $10,000 cash bail or $20,000 bond. Members of the Wyoming County Drug Task Force responded to the scene of the original complaint and assisted deputies with the investigation.

Jon M. Pullman, 39, of Perry, was charged Aug. 3 with harassment in the second degree after allegedly threatening an employee at the Perry Public Library. He is also accused of making threatening comments of harming people. He was arraigned in Perry Village Court where an order of protection was issued barring Pullman from having any contact with the victim and the library. He is due in Perry Village Court at a later date.

Burke M. Hawkins, 53, of Perry, was charged Aug. 7 with petit larceny. Hawkins is accused of taking three 25-ounce cans of beer, totaling $4.65, from Crosby’s without paying for them. He is due in Perry Village Court Sept. 12.

Ashley N. Dumbleton, 22, of Gainesville, was charged Aug. 4 with arson in the fifth degree, criminal mischief in the third degree, grand larceny in the fourth degree, and making a false written statement. Dumbleton was arrested following a complaint of missing property in the Town of Gainesville. The victim reported more than $1,000 worth of property was missing on July 27 when she was escorted to Dumbleton’s home on that date to retrieve her goods. On July 31 the Sheriff’s Office investigated a complaint of burned remnants located at a home on Lamont Road in the Town of Gainesville. The victim’s name was allegedly found on some of the burned remnants. Dumbleton was arraigned in the Town of Warsaw Court where she was released to the pretrial supervision program. She is due in the Town of Gainesville Court Aug. 21.

Daniel LaClair, 29, of Clinton County, was charged Aug. 5 with driving while intoxicated as a misdemeanor, driving with a blood alcohol content at or above .08 percent as a misdemeanor, and following too closely. Deputies responded to Route 20A and French Road, Sheldon, for a two-car accident. According to the report, LaClair had been driving his pickup eastbound when the vehicle in front of him slowed to turn onto French Road and he is accused of rear-ending the vehicle. A subsequent breath test allegedly showed LaClair’s BAC at or above .08 percent. He is due in the Town of Sheldon Court Aug. 28. Varysburg Fire Department assisted at the scene.

Cindy Laurich, 55, of Java, was charged Aug. 3 with driving while impaired by drugs following an accident on Curries Road, Java. Deputies say Laurich had been driving a motorcycle northbound on Curriers Road and lost control of the bike while going around a curve. She was treated at the scene by Strykersville Ambulance for minor injuries. She allegedly failed roadside field sobriety tests and was arrested. A Wyoming County Drug Recognition Expert says Laurich was impaired by a drug following a drug influence evaluation. She is due in the Town of Java Court at a later date.

Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at 1:54 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, news, crime, Java, Orangeville, Warsaw.
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      Jared T. Price

Jared T. Price, 21, of Java, has been charged with another felony stemming from a July 28 incident.

Wyoming County Sheriff’s deputies say Price was being transported from the scene of a domestic incident in the Town of Java to the Warsaw Court. During transport, and while in the Town of Orangeville, he is accused of intentionally damaging electrical wiring located in the area of the rear seat of the deputy's patrol car which controlled the airbags. He is also accused of bending the rear seat in order to access the wiring.

The alleged tampering caused an excess of $3,000 in damages to the patrol vehicle.

He was arrested Aug. 4 and arraigned in the Town of Warsaw Court and jailed in lieu of an additional $25,000 cash bail or $50,000 bond.

He was put in Wyoming County Jail July 28 in lieu of $50,000 bail.

His earlier charges include:

    • July 18: Criminal contempt in the second degree for violating an order of protection. Bail was issued and posted;

    • July 20: Unlawfully growing cannabis and unlawful possession of marijuana;

    • July 24: DWAI – drugs and related vehicle and traffic charges. Bail was again issued and posted; and

    • July 28: Resisting arrest, criminal mischief in the fourth degree, and attempted escape in the second degree.

He is due in the Town of Orangeville Court Aug. 16.

See related: Java man arrested four times in two weeks

Friday, August 4, 2017 at 5:32 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, WCCH, Warsaw, hospital, health.

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Press release, file photo:

Wyoming County Community Health System's (WCCHS) Chief Executive Donald Eichenauer today confirmed that WCCHS received the $20 million grant funding this week that was awarded in March 2016. The funding was part of the New York State’s Capital Restructuring Financing and Essential Health Care Provider Support program and was used to retire virtually all of the debt incurred with respect to the hospital’s 2014 renovations.

In March, Chairman of the Wyoming County Board of Supervisors Doug Berwanger said that the money essentially clears the debt incurred during the hospital’s major upgrades and positions WCCH to provide health care to the residents of Wyoming County for a long time.

Having paid off virtually all of its debt, the hospital will be able to increase services in areas such as orthopedics, allergy and nephrology as well as take advantage of its new relationship with Erie County Medical Center (ECMC) Corporation.

"Having reliable health care services is important in a rural community,” Eichenauer said. “This funding will go a long way in ensuring WCCHS is prepared to provide high-level services for residents of Wyoming County and surrounding area today, tomorrow and far into the future.”

“This is a significantly positive outcome for WCCHS, thanks to the hard work of the hospital’s executive team and the Wyoming County Board of Supervisors led respectively by Don Eichenauer and Doug Berwanger,” said President and CEO of ECMC Thomas Quatroche Jr. “With the new partnership between WCCHS and ECMC, we can focus squarely on providing reliable quality health care services for Wyoming County’s residents.”  

Officials say Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul and Sen. Patrick Gallivan were instrumental in helping secure the funding.

Wyoming County Community Hospital is a 62-bed rural, acute-care hospital accredited by The Joint Commission. It is the sole inpatient provider for Wyoming County, which has a population of approximately 44,000. In addition to an acute care hospital, its services include an attached 138-bed nursing home, adult day health care, and inpatient Behavioral Health Unit. The hospital has approximately 2,500 inpatient admissions per year and 14,000 emergency department visits per year.

For more information about WCCH visit www.wcchs.net.

Friday, August 4, 2017 at 4:39 pm

The following were in Wyoming County Court before Judge Michael Mohun Aug. 2.

Steven Green, an inmate in a State Correctional Facility, pled not guilty to two counts of assault in the second degree, both are Class D felonies. Motions are scheduled Sept. 20. Bail was set at $5,000 cash and $10,000 bond. Bail is set for state inmate cases for two reasons:

    • In the event that the inmate’s current sentence is overturned on appeal or the inmate’s sentence is about to expire the bail will kick in on the new case and the inmate would be turned over to the Wyoming County jail while the new case is pending; and

    • When bail is placed on an inmate it follows the inmate so when they are moved to different facilities it is one way for them to be found and also the state system knows there is another case still pending.

Christina Dadey, who is accused of a crime in Middlebury, waived indictment and pled not guilty to aggravated driving while intoxicated, per se, and driving while intoxicated, both as Class E felonies; operating a motor vehicle without a court ordered ignition interlock device, a misdemeanor, failure to keep right, and consumption of alcoholic beverages in certain motor vehicles. The Per Se law is based not on the observations of the arresting police officer, but the results obtained from an intoxilyzer machine. The case has been adjourned to Aug. 17 for conference and Sept. 20 for motions.

The following were in court Aug. 3.

Cory Dahl, who is accused of a crime in Castile, had his case adjourned to Sept. 14 for motions.

Ervin Delude Sr., who committed a crime in Gainesville, pled guilty to two counts of aggravated family offense, a Class E felony as a second felony offender. Sentencing is scheduled Aug. 31. He is being held without bail in the Wyoming County Jail.

Carl Vander, who committed a crime in Perry, was sentenced to two-and-one-half to five years in prison on the conviction of grand larceny in the third degree, a Class D felony. He was also sentenced to two to four years in prison for grand larceny in the fourth degree, a Class E felony. The sentences are to run concurrently with each other and with violations of probation. He is also jointly responsible with his co-defendant for $4,630 in restitution, and fees and surcharges.

Tylor Phinney, who committed a crime in Sheldon, was sentenced to five years probation, $1,456.41 in restitution, and fees and surcharges on the conviction of attempted assault in the second degree, a Class E felony.

Brandon McCoy, who committed a crime in Warsaw and previously admitted to violating interim probation, was sentenced to five years probation, $1,104.54 in restitution and 170 hours of community service. He was convicted of grand larceny in the fourth degree, a Class E felony, and conspiracy in the fifth degree.

John Sprague, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was sentenced on the conviction of failure to register as a sex offender, a Class E felony, and forcible touching, a misdemeanor, to one year in jail on both charges. The sentences are to run concurrently. Additionally, an order of protection was issued, an agreement of registering as a Level 2 sex offender was ordered, and he is responsible for $1,425 in restitution, and fees and surcharges.

Go Go, who committed a crime in Warsaw, was arraigned on an indictment for driving while ability impaired by drugs and DWAI – combined influence of drugs or of drugs and alcohol, both are Class D felonies; aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the first degree, a Class E felony, and operating a motor vehicle without a court ordered ignition interlock device, a misdemeanor. Go Go pled guilty to DWAI – drugs, a Class D felony. Sentencing is scheduled Oct. 26. They are being held without bail in the Wyoming County Jail.

Cheyenne Kimbrell, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, was arraigned on a violation of probation. The case has been adjourned to Wednesday. Kimbrell is being held without bail in the Wyoming County Jail.

Elizabeth Mattingly, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, admitted to a violation of probation. Probation was revoked and she was sentenced to nine months in jail.

Carl Vander, who committed a crime in Wyoming County, admitted to two violations of probation and was sentenced to one-and-one-third to four years in prison on both charges. The sentences are to run concurrently.

Friday, August 4, 2017 at 3:35 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, drugs, Warsaw, news.
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      Wendell Fuqua       Raven Houston

Two Rochester residents were arrested Tuesday evening after allegedly selling suspected crack cocaine in the parking lot at McDonald’s in Warsaw.

Wyoming County Drug Task Force members say, Wendell Fuqua, 35, is accused of selling seven “rocks” of suspected crack cocaine to a person that had been under surveillance by the DTF.

Raven Houston, 23, was also charged, as she was the driver of the vehicle that Fuqua was a passenger in.

Both were charged with criminal sale of a controlled substance in the third degree and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third degree, both are Class B felonies.

Fuqua was put in Wyoming County Jail without bail. Houston is being held in lieu of $10,000 cash bail.

Task Force members were assisted at the scene by the Wyoming County Sheriff’s Office, New York State Police and the Warsaw Police Department.

The Wyoming County DTF includes members from the Sheriff’s Office, and the Arcade, Attica, Perry and Warsaw Police departments.

Suspected illegal drug activity can be reported to the confidential drug tip line at (585) 786-8965.

Wednesday, August 2, 2017 at 6:54 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, education, announcements, Arcade, Attica, Perry, Warsaw.

More than 1,000 students completed their baccalaureate studies at State University of New York at Oswego in spring 2017 and were recognized during commencement in May.

A student who graduates with honors is indicated by the traditional Latin phrases summa cum laude, with highest honor (grade averages of 3.8 to 4.0); magna cum laude, with great honor (grade averages of 3.6 to 3.79); and cum laude, with honor (grade averages of 3.30 to 3.59).

Graduates from the area include:

    • Benjamin G. Aylsworth, of Attica, earned his degree in history, summa cum laude;

    • Haley R. Parker, of Perry, earned her degree in adolescence education, cum laude;

    • Alyssa R. Aldrich, of Warsaw, earned her degree in biochemistry; and

    • Teraisa S. Matuszak, of Arcade, earned her degree in career and technical education.

U.S. News Media Group counts SUNY Oswego among the top public regional universities in the North for 2017, and the Princeton Review includes Oswego in its 2017 college guidebook "The Best Northeastern Colleges" and in its national list of "Green Colleges."

A 156-year-old comprehensive college in the SUNY system, Oswego enrolls about 8,000 students in its College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; School of Business; School of Communication, Media and the Arts; and School of Education.

Visit oswego.edu/gradstudies for more information.

 

Wednesday, August 2, 2017 at 6:32 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, fire, Warsaw, Perry, Silver Springs, news.

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Improper disposal of rags used to stain wood is said to be the cause of the shop/garage fire Tuesday night in Warsaw.

One firefighter suffered a minor hand injury during the mishap and was treated at the scene.

Firefighters from Warsaw, Silver Springs, Perry Center, and Perry fire departments were at 5268 Streamer Road for two-and-one-half hours putting out the flames.

Fire Chief in Charge Warsaw Assistant Fire Chief Adam Richter was assisted at the scene by Wyoming County Emergency Services and NYSEG, with Leicester Fire Department standing by at empty fire stations.

The estimated cost of damages to the shop is $60,000.

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Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 11:02 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, fire, news, Warsaw, Perry, Silver Springs.

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Firefighters from Warsaw, Perry, Silver Springs and Perry Center fire departments responded to a fire at 5268 Streamer Road, Warsaw, around 7:45 this evening.

Assisting crews and Fire Chief in Charge Warsaw Assistant Chief Adam Richter was Emergency Managment and NYSEG.

At the time of this post, the cause of the fire is unknown and no injuries were reported. ​

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Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 7:50 pm
posted by Howard Owens in fire, Warsaw, news.

There is a working barn fire at 5268 Streamer Road, Warsaw.

Monday, July 31, 2017 at 5:24 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, events, history, Historian's Office, Warsaw, cemetary.

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Sometimes…there just isn’t any family left to maintain the gravestones of deceased relatives.

So who cleans and repairs the tombstones?

“Sometimes nobody,” said Wyoming County Historian Cindy Amrhein. “Many of the incorporated cemeteries do their best, but it is difficult with limited funds. Other cemeteries are considered abandoned; there is no association who cares for it and no recent burials are happening. New York State law only requires those to be mowed by a town twice a year.”

Just last week, Amrhein and about 25 people participated in the workshop "Grave Matters" – a program that provides volunteers training in gravestone preservation techniques through classroom instruction and hands-on demonstration. The program is provided by the Western New York Association of Historical Agencies (WNYAHA).

The classroom portion of the program was held at the United Church of Warsaw on South Main Street. Participants then traveled south down the road just a bit with WNYAHA Administrative Coordinator Terry C. Abrams to the Warsaw Pioneer Cemetery for the hands-on portion of the workshop.

“They (WNYAHA) have been holding the workshop for nine years,” Amrhein said. “Terry asked me this spring if I would serve on the board. When the topic of where to hold Grave Matters this year came up, it was suggested to hold it in Wyoming County since it has never been presented here.”

Since most repair projects are done by volunteer groups, Amrhein says proper techniques are important in maintaining the integrity of the stone.

“When thinking about repairs keep it realistic on what you can do without machinery or other equipment,” Abrams said. “A sand and gravel mix tamped down is really all you need to level out a sinking stone.

“You’ll want to get the lichen and dirt off the stone because, over time it will eat away at the stone – especially limestone. And it’s also important to keep vegetation around the stone to help with preventing erosion.”

The new recommendation for cleaning is a product called "D/2 Biological Soluntion." It is biodegradable and doesn't damage the stone or the ground, says Abrams. However, he also noted that the product can be costly.

(A website called gravestonecleaner.com sells a one-gallon jug and one-quart reusable/refillable combo of D/2 for $55. Larger quantities are available; there are also instructions on the clean for cleaning gravestones with it.)

“From a historical standpoint, our office has tombstone inscriptions from every cemetery in the county since they were first written down in the 1950s,” Amrhein said. “Some of the old stones can be difficult to read without proper cleaning and repair. Methods have changed as we learn more. The way it used to be done, in some cases, has inadvertently caused more damage to the stones. Knowing the right way can be shared with others especially if a volunteer group plans to work on a particular cemetery.”

However, whether a person or group can repair or clean a gravestone for a non-relative, depends on who owns the cemetery, Abrams says.

“Generally, if a person performs a reasonable search for next of kin and can't find one, the person can go to the cemetery board and make the request to repair the stones.”

When a headstone is in fairly good condition, it can be a useful tool for the Historian’s Office as well as genealogists.

“When we are researching an event, a headstone may be the only clue we have at the moment about the person,” Amrhein said. “A headstone, or lack thereof, can tell us if those involved moved out of the area before they died, or if they are in fact buried in the county and when they died.

“Sometimes the stone is already knocked over and the piece you need is really there just underneath the surface of the dirt where the grass grew over. It was fascinating to watch our instructor, Brian Daddis, reset a stone back to level again and to clean it off.”

Daddis is the owner of Brian Daddis Masonry Restoration out of North Tonawanda.

Gone are the days of bolting metal straps to the stones to hold them together – only to later have rust deteriorate the stone around the mended area. Gone are the days of cleaning the markers with bleach or spraying on shaving cream in order to read them, says Amrhein.

“All of those things help in a tombstone's destruction.”

In addition to the Historian’s Office, Warsaw Town Historian and Assistant County Historian Sally Smith hosted the event. Other sponsors included Carmichael & Reed Monument Co., Robinson & Hackemer Funeral Home, and Lantz’s Bulk Foods, all of Warsaw.

For more information about WNYAHA visit http://www.wnyaha.org/

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Monday, July 31, 2017 at 12:29 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, crime, news, Java, Warsaw.
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     Jared T. Price

Since July 18 Jared T. Price has been arrested four times. This latest arrest stems from an alleged domestic incident in the Town of Java.

On July 18 an order of protection was issued against Price. According to police reports, four hours later, the Java man violated the order.

On July 28, he was again accused of being involved in a disturbance with the protected parties at a Welch Road address.

However, deputies say Price left the home prior to their arrival. A State Trooper found the 21-year-old several minutes later close by.

Following the investigation, he was charged with burglary in the second degree, criminal contempt in the second degree, and attempted petit larceny.

However, deputies say Price was not cooperative upon arrest and kicked out the rear door window of a patrol car in an attempt to flee.

Subsequently, he garnered additional charges of resisting arrest, criminal mischief in the fourth degree, and attempted escape in the second degree.

The suspect was arraigned in the Town of Warsaw Court and put in Wyoming County Jail in lieu of $50,000 bail.

Other charges in the last couple of weeks include:

    • July 18: Criminal contempt in the second degree for violating an order of protection. Bail was issued and posted;

    • July 20: Unlawfully growing cannabis and unlawful possession of marijuana; and

    • July 24: DWAI – drugs and related vehicle and traffic charges. Bail was again issued and posted.

The arrest on the 24th stems from a traffic stop for which Price is accused of driving a vehicle with no doors, no front windshield, no license plates, and with an ax stuck in the roof of the car.

As of this post, Price has not posted bail for the latest arrest and charges.

See related: Java man arrested after allegedly driving a vehicle with no doors or front windshield

Friday, July 28, 2017 at 6:08 pm
posted by Julia Ferrini in Wyoming County, announcements, events, Warsaw, Sports, football.

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Photos submitted, information provided by Warsaw Junior Tigers.

Three Warsaw Junior Tigers earned accolades following a four-day, all-in football camp at the College at Brockport held earlier this month.

Tristan Schurr, Jacob McEntire, and Brayden Merritt worked with both experienced high school and collegiate athletes, as well as top-level coaches to fine tune fundamental football skills. The camp, hosted by Offense-Defense Sports, focuses on the development of players from youth through high school levels.

Tristan and Jacob each earned Most Valuable Player rankings. The designation is given to one player per age group, per position.

Brayden earned the Performance Award, which is given to players who have made a major, play-making impact during camp and throughout the week.

“I think it’s important that if a player wants to continue to develop skills outside of the regular season, that they have a reputable program to go to,” said Warsaw Junior Tigers President Kelly Ashcraft. “This camp has a long standing tradition of working with players to make sure that they have the skills needed to make them successful both on and off the field. I couldn’t be prouder of our boys for taking the initiative.”

“It really helps improve both your offensive and defensive skills. You learn a lot from the other players and coaches,” Tristan said. “The camp makes you a better person and leader, too.”

All three players have been invited to the 12th annual Offense-Defense All-American Bowl (dates to be released in coming weeks).

“With practice starting on Monday (July 31) for the 2017 season, these boys have a head start and are hoping to bring some of what they learned back to their teammates,” Ashcraft said.

Check out the action at the season opener at 10:30 a.m. Aug. 27 at the Middle-High School football fields, Warsaw. The junior game starts at noon, with the senior game starting at 2 p.m.

The Warsaw Junior Tigers is part of the Community Youth Football League (CYFL), which consists of 17 towns throughout Wyoming, Allegany, and Livingston counties.

For more information about the camp visit http://www.o-d.com/.

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